David Gryn blog

Posts Tagged ‘Video’

Daata Editions X Vanity Projects featuring Scott Reeder

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Miami, Nails, New York, Scott Reeder, Uncategorized, Vanity Projects on 22/03/2017 at 1:43 pm

scottreeder-nyc

Daata and Vanity Projects are delighted to announce their collaborative partnership. We have launched a program from the Daata catalogue taking place over the next year, starting with Scott Reeder’s recent commissioned works for Daata launched at Art LA Contemporary 2017.

Vanity Projects is beyond a traditional gallery space.  While providing a bespoke nail experience, they offer video art programming aimed at changing the way people perceive and experience the video medium.

Directed by Rita de Alencar Pinto, the program includes collaborations with international curators and artists. In March 2017, Vanity Projects partnered with online art platform Daata Editions. Daata Editions commission’s artist video, sound, poetry and web. This new, logical and innovative way to collect art is designed as a native platform to a new generation of artists who work with moving image and sound.

Vanity Projects is committed to presenting contemporary video art and this partnership galvanizes their ethos of developing new and innovative platforms to present the medium. Starting March 25th, 2017, Vanity Projects New York and Miami will run concurrent programs featuring artists in the Daata catalogue. With both solo and group presentations the content spans a wide area of interests and artists point of view. https://daata-editions.com/

Schedule:
March 25 – April 14 – Scott Reeder
April 15 – May 9 – Saya Woolfalk
June 10 – July 7 – A GOTH LIFE
July 8 – August 3 – Ed Fornieles
August 4 – September 2 – Yung Jake
September 3 – September 29 – Jacky Connolly
October 30 – November 17 – Jillian Mayer
November 18 – December 3 – DAATA MIX TAPE
December 4 – January 2 – ART BASEL EDITION
January 3 – January 26 – Jeremy Couillard
January 27 – February 14 – Rashaad Newsome

http://www.vanityprojectsnyc.com

A Goth Life – A Stranger Love Playlist – Daata Editions

In A Goth Life, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Blandy, David Gryn, Folkestone, Hannah Perry, Leo Gabin, Rashaad Newsome, Strangelove, Takeshi Murata, Terry Smith, Uncategorized, Zadie Xa on 12/03/2017 at 12:35 pm

plantw-web

A Goth Life … (A Stranger Love Version playlist)
Curated by Daata Editions
Space Bar & Gallery, Folkestone 13/14 March 2017 

FREE continuous screening all day 11-5pm presented by David Gryn, DIrector of Daata Editions.

Strangelove Time Based Media Festival 9-24 March 2017

A Goth Life Playlist

Takeshi Murata – Witch Rises, 2015

Jacky Connolly – Anhedonia, 2017

Leo Gabin – Girlhood, 2015

Hannah Perry – PRINCES AND PRINCESSES, 2015

Rashaad Newsome – Put Some Respect On My Name, 2016

Ed Fornieles – Shoot, 2016

Larry Achiampong  –  The Ascent (100 Degrees), 2016

Yung Jake – How, 2016

Zadie Xa – Deep Space Mathematics // The Transfer of Knowledge 1, 2016

Tracey Emin – I Can’t Love Anymore, 2016

Jillian Mayer – Web Cam Love Song, 2016

Leo Gabin – Lips, 2015

Hannah Perry – what are you thinking about, 2015

Casey Jane Ellison – Do You Seem Wonderful Casey Automated Private Test (DYSWCAPT) 5, 2016

Jake Chapman – POODLES,  2016

Tameka Norris – i don’t feel anything, 2016

Scott Reeder – Bands, 2016

Hannah Perry – sick off smoke, 2015

Jacolby Satterwhite – En Plein Air Abstraction #7, 2016

Zadie Xa – Deep Space Mathematics // The Transfer of Knowledge 2, 2016

Rashaad Newsome – Banji In Da Basement, 2016

David Blandy – Moon, 2015

Rachel Maclean – Let It Go – Part 4, 2015

Hannah Perry – Waiting here, 2015

Leo Gabin – Awesome, 2015

Rashaad Newsome – SPICY, 2016

Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings – Vanila, 2015

Thora Dolven Balke – YD1, 2016 (sound)

Zadie Xa – Deep Space Mathematics // The Transfer of Knowledge 3, 2016

Keren Cytter – Terrorist of Love, 2016 (a Daata & Artspace co-commission)

Ed Fornieles – Poisoned, 2016

Hannah Perry – keep the peace, 2015

Jacky Connolly – Anorexia, 2017

Takeshi Murata – Plant Whisperer, 2015

VIMEO TRAILER

Web

2017-02-16-A-Goth-Life-1

Image: Takeshi Murata, Plant Whisperer 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Daata Editions on Artspace

In Artist, Artspace, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Digital, Online, Uncategorized, Video on 31/01/2017 at 12:25 pm

 

Daata Editions now available to purchase on Artspace

https://www.artspace.com/partn…

Artists selected:  Larry Achiampong, Casey Jane Ellison, Tracey Emin, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Scott Lyman, Takeshi Murata, Tameka Norris, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Jacolby Satterwhite, Saya Woolfalk, Zadie Xa.

Daata Editions commissions artists video, sound, poetry and web. Artworks on the website are available to view and acquire as digital downloads in a limited edition.

Daata Playlist:

Larry Achiampong, 1. The Beginning (19 Degrees), 2016

Casey Jane Ellison, Do You Seem Wonderful Casey Automated Private Test (DYSWCAPT) 1, 2016

Tracey Emin, You Must Have Hope, 2016

Ed Fornieles, Electric, 2016

Leo Gabin, Break Up, 2015

Scott Lyman, Pink Empire, 2016

Takeshi Murata, OM Making It Rain, 2015

Tameka Norris, immature tameka, 2016

Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Pink Rooms, 2016

Jacolby Satterwhite, En Plein Air Abstraction #4, 2016

Saya Woolfalk, Colour Mixing Machine 6, 2016

Zadie Xa, Deep Space Mathematics // The Transfer of Knowledge 1, 2016

 

Image: Casey Jane Ellison, Do You Seem Wonderful Casey Automated Private Test (DYSWCAPT) 1, 2016

Daata Editions Mix Tape for ACE Hotel Downtown Los Angeles 2017.

In ACE Hotel, ALAC, Art Los Angeles Contemporary, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Ed Fornieles, Jillian Mayer, Los Angeles, Scott Reeder, Uncategorized, Yung Jake on 26/01/2017 at 9:14 pm

ed-fornieles-electric

David Gryn, Director and Curator of Daata Editions, has created a special Daata Editions Mix Tape for play at the ACE Hotel Downtown Los Angeles. Daata are launching new artworks online this week by Yung Jake, Jillian Mayer and Scott Reeder and will be at Art Los Angeles Contemporary at the Barker Hangar, Santa Monica.

Daata – ACE Mix Tape playlist

Electric – Ed Fornieles
Terrorist of Love – Keren Cytter
immature tameka – Tameka Norris
Girlhood – Leo Gabin
Pink Rooms – Hannah Quinlan and Rosie Hastings
How – Yung Jake
Deep Space Mathematics // The Transfer of Knowledge 1 – Zadie Xa
Put Some Respect On My Name – Rashaad Newsome
THE WORSE YOU FEEL THE BETTER I LOOK – Hannah Perry
En Plein Air Abstraction #4 – Jacolby Satterwhite
Bands – Scott Reeder
OM Making it Rain – Takeshi Murata
(Running time 21 mins)

Image: Ed Fornieles, Electric, 2016

Daata Editions at Art Los Angeles Contemporary 2017

In ALAC, Art, Art Los Angeles Contemporary, Artprojx, Barker Hangar, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Jillian Mayer, Scott Reeder, Uncategorized, USA, Yung Jake on 22/01/2017 at 5:34 pm

scott-3

Daata Editions at ALAC 2017

Yung Jake, Jillian Mayer, Scott Reeder.

New artworks released on Daata from Thursday, January 26, 2017 

This is the latest release of dedicated artist projects from the Daata Editions Season Two commissioning cycle, featuring Yung Jake, Jillian Mayer and Scott Reeder.

In the Art Los Angeles Contemporary Reading Room, Daata will screen a selection of these new artists works and other artworks from the Daata Editions catalogue, along with a special screening, reception and introduction by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions, in the ALAC Auditorium on Sunday, January 29 at 11.30am. All works are visible and available to acquire online at http://daata-editions.com

Daata Editions commissioned artists: Larry Achiampong, Sofie Alsbo, Ilit Azoulay, Thora Dolven Balke, Helen Benigson, David Blandy, Phoebe Boswell, Jake Chapman, Jacky Connolly, Matt Copson, Keren Cytter, Graham Dolphin, Anaïs Duplan, Melanie Eckersley, Casey Jane Ellison, Tracey Emin, Laura Focarazzo, Hannah Ford, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Yung Jake, Kate Jessop, Jasmine Johnson, Daniel Keller & Martti Kalliala, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, Lina Lapelyte, Sara Ludy, Scott Lyman, Rachel Maclean, Michael Manning, Scott Mason, Jillian Mayer, Florian Meisenberg, C.O. Moed, Jonathan Monaghan, Takeshi Murata, Rashaad Newsome, Camille Norment, Tameka Norris, Hannah Perry, Elise Peterson, Quayola, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Jon Rafman, Scott Reeder, Ariana Reines, Charles Richardson, Jacolby Satterwhite, Julian Scordato, John Skoog, Daniel Swan, Abri de Swardt, Katie Torn, Amalia Ulman, Artie Vierkant, Stephen Vitiello, Susanne Wiegner, Chloe Wise, Saya Woolfalk, Zadie Xa, Antoinette Zwirchmayr.

Daata Editions commissions artist video, sound, poetry and web. This new, logical and innovative way to collect art is designed as a native platform to a new generation of artists who work with moving image and sound. Limited edition artworks can be viewed and acquired as digital downloads. Sign up at https://daata-editions.com/

Art Los Angeles Contemporary

The Barker Hangar 

3021 Airport Ave 

Santa Monica, CA 90405 

January 26 – 29, 2017 

Opening Night 

Thursday, January 26, 2017 

7pm–9pm

Hours 

Friday, January 27: 11am–7pm 

Saturday, January 28: 11am–7pm 

Sunday, January 29: 11am–6pm 

Image: Bands by Scott Reeder, 2016 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Daata Editions – A 2016 Round Up

In ArtBasel, Artspace, Artsy, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Frieze, ICA, New Art Dealers, NY Times, Scott Reeder, Uncategorized, Venice, Zuecca Projects on 19/12/2016 at 12:49 pm

 

scott-7-gandolf

A Great Daata Year in 2016 and Looking Forward to Daata in 2017

2016 certainly has had its ‘quirks’ in the world-at-large, but Daata has had a truly fruitful and eventful year. With the final artwork releases from Season One, the inaugural Independent Brussels, Art for Tomorrow – NY Times Conference in Doha, launch of the Season Two artist commissions at NADA New York, launch of the Daata App, link up with Artsy for their ICA London Party, Gentrification with Hannah Quinlan and Rosie Hastings at the BBar, Bauer Hotel, Venice in collaboration with Zuecca Projects as part of the Venice Architectural Biennale, sound artworks at Chart Art Fair in Copenhagen, a Venice Film Festival project in collaboration with Zuecca Projects, POSTmatter/Wetransfer project with Saya Woolfalk, the Katherine Finerty curation ‘Reuse, remix, recode, new releases at EXPO Chicago, more new releases at Frieze London, launch of New Contemporaries curated artworks, Daata x Artspace Commissions launch with Keren Cytter, Daata on DAD x Apple TV, Virtually Me at Vanity Projects curated by Tiffany Zabludowicz, Legacy Russell’s curated project ‘#WanderingWILDING: Movement as Movement‘, a new look Daata homepage, Keren Cytter screened at Art Basel in Miami Beach and screening at Festive Cultural Traffic.

Artists whom we have released newly commissioned artworks by in 2016: Larry Achiampong, Sofie Alsbo, Thora Dolven Balke, Phoebe Boswell, Jake Chapman, Keren Cytter, Graham Dolphin, Anaïs Duplan, Melanie Eckersley, Casey Jane Ellison, Tracey Emin, Hannah Ford, Ed Fornieles, Jasmine Johnson, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, Sara Ludy. Scott Lyman, Michael Manning, Scott Mason, Jonathan Monaghan, Rashaad Newsome, Tameka Norris, Elise Peterson, Quayola, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Ariana Reines, Jacolby Satterwhite, John Skoog, Daniel Swan, Abri de Swardt, Katie Torn, Artie Vierkant, Saya Woolfalk, Zadie Xa.

Curators selecting for Daata in 2016: bitforms gallery, Gutter Records, New Contemporaries, Katherine Finerty, Legacy Russell.

Foreward texts in 2016: Loreta Lamargese, Gary Zhexi Zhang, Anton Haugen, Lindsay Howard.

Instagram takeovers thanks to Daata artists: Chloe Wise, Matt Copson, Helen Benigson, Stephen Vitiello, Florian Meisenberg, Leo Gabin, Rachel Maclean, Katie Torn, Thora Dolven Balke, Michael Manning, Jonathan Monaghan, Sara Ludy, Saya Woolfalk.

Daata in the News: i-D, Cultured Magazine, FAD Magazine, Artsy, It’s Nice That, sweet, Aston Martin, Elephant, Artspace, NY Times, POSTmatter and more.

Artists soon to be released in 2017: Yung Jake, Jillian Mayer, Camille Norment, Scott Reeder and six artists curated by Zata Banks; Laura Focarazzo, Kate Jessop, C.O. Moed, Julian Scordato, Susanne Wiegner, Antoinette Zwirchmayr. Daata will soon be announcing many other exciting plans, projects, collaborations and commissions.

Special humungous thanks to Anita Z and Danai, John, Richard, Alessandro Possati at Zuecca Projects, Andy Moss at Spike Island, Radovan & Jamie at Studio Scasacia and Sutton PR for all their work and support in 2016 to make Daata happen !!!

And with utmost thanks and huge appreciation to the artists, curators, galleries, art fairs, institutes, collectors, students, collaborators and to you the viewers who all make this possible and worthwhile.

Image: Scott Reeder, Nodes, 2016 (soon to be released on Daata in 2017)

daat-in-festive-2

Film and Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2016 – Program

In ABMB, Art, Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Fair, artists, Artprojx, Best Dressed Chicken in Town, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Film, Film and Video, Film Library, Miami, Miami Beach, New World Center, New World Symphony, SoundScape Park, Uncategorized on 23/11/2016 at 10:18 am

 

abmb-2016

abmb16_film_final

Film & Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2016. 

Curated by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions. 

Nov 30 – Dec 3. 

Soundscape Park, New World Symphony Center, Miami Beach.

Details:

Weds Nov 30

6pm

Surround Sound artworks in SoundScape Park. A compilation of sound works by Ain Bailey, Zoë Buckman, A.K. Burns, Jonathan Montague, Molly Palmer (supported by The Fountainhead Residency) and Susannah Stark. Soundcloud info

8pm

Best Dressed Chicken in Town – a compilation of artworks. 

Tromarama, Psylocibin, 2010, 51ʺ; Edouard Malingue.
Ana Mendieta, Anima, Silueta de Cohetes (Firework Piece), 1976, 2ʹ23ʺ; Lelong
Anri Sala, Mixed Behaviour, 2003, 8ʹ19ʺ; Hauser & Wirth.
Derrick Adams with Ramon Silva, My Jesus Piece, 2014, 2ʹ38ʺ; Rhona Hoffman.
Samson Young, The Coffee Cantata (Institute of Fictional Ethnomusicology), 2015, 6ʹ06ʺ; Edouard Malingue.
Kudzanai Chiurai, Moyo, 2013, 5ʹ33ʺ; Goodman Gallery.
Edgardo Aragón, La encomienda, Perú, 2013, 4ʹ45ʺ; mor charpentier.
Luther Price, Singing Biscuits, 2006, 4ʹ; Callicoon.
Catharina van Eetvelde (with music by To Rococo Rot), Glu, 2007, 2ʹ28ʺ; Greta Meert.
Ara Peterson, Alsatian Darn, 2011, 4ʹ17ʺ; Ratio 3.
Matt Copson, Sob Story, 2016, 5ʹ; High Art.
Martin Creed, Work No. 2656 Understanding, 2016, 3ʹ11ʺ; Hauser & Wirth.
Jillian Mayer, I am Your Grandma, 2011, 1ʹ3ʺ; David Castillo.
Kovásznai György, Memory of the Summer of ‘74, 1974, 9ʹ15ʺ.
Tromarama, Serigala Militia, 2006, 4ʹ22ʺ; Edouard Malingue.
Kim Gordon, Proposal for a Dance, 2012, 12ʹ; 303 Gallery.
Li Shurui and Li Daiguo, The Shelter: All Fears Come from the Unknown Shimmering at the Edge of the World, 2012/2016, 3ʹ09ʺ; White Space Beijing.
Adam Shecter, Study for Satellites 4 (Train), 2016, 1ʹ52ʺ; 11R.
Brian Alfred, Chromacity, 2016, 4ʹ17ʺ; Ameringer McEnery Yohe.
Dashiell Manley, It and another other, 2015, 3ʹ33ʺ; Jessica Silverman.
Haroon Mirza, Adhãn, 2009, 4ʹ54ʺ; Lisson.
Zak Ové, A Land So Far, 2016, 6ʹ30ʺ; Vigo.
Cabelo, Itamambuca Dub, 2014, 4ʹ; Marilia Razuk.
Lena Daly, Trix, 2016, 5ʹ; Various Small Fires.
Nate Boyce, Repossesion Seqeunce II, 2016, 4ʹ30ʺ; Altman Siegel.
Tomislav Gotovac, Ella, 1966, 3ʹ25ʺ; Gregor Podnar.
Rodney Graham, A Little Thought, 2000, 3ʹ54ʺ; Hauser & Wirth.
Keren Cytter, Terrorist of Love, 2016, 3ʹ9ʺ; Nagel Draxler (A Free Downloadable Artwork commissioned by Daata Editions & Artspace)

10pm

Double Bill: Rita Ackermann and Christian Marclay

Rita Ackermann, Movement as Monument, 2011, 22ʹ30ʺ; Hauser & Wirth
Christian Marclay, Mixed Reviews (American Sign Language), 1999/2001, 30ʹ; Paula Cooper

Thurs Dec 1

6pm

Surround Sound artworks in SoundScape Park. A compilation of sound works by Ain Bailey, Zoë Buckman, A.K. Burns, Jonathan Montague, Molly Palmer (supported by The Fountainhead Residency) and Susannah Stark. Soundcloud info

8pm

Best Dressed Chicken in Town. A compilation of artworks by Ana Mendieta, Anri Sala, Derrick Adams with Ramon Silvera, Samson Young, Kudzanai Chiurai, Edgardo Aragón, Luther Price, Catharina van Eetvelde, Ara Peterson, Matt Copson, Martin Creed, Jillian Mayer, György Kovásznai, Tromarama, Kim Gordon, Li Shurui & Li Daiguo, Adam Shecter, Brian Alfred, Dashiell Manley, Haroon Mirza, Zak Ové, Cabelo, Lena Daly, Nate Boyce, Tomislav Gotovac, Rodney Graham, Keren Cytter.

10pm

New Parthenon: works by artists: Rashid Johnson, Ain Bailey/Sonia Boyce, Anna Grenman, Alex Prager, Penny Siopis.

Rashid Johnson, The New Black Yoga, 2011, 10ʹ57ʺ; Hauser & Wirth.
Ain Bailey, Sonia Boyce, Oh Adelaide, 7ʹ10ʺ.
Anna Grenman, Irminsul, 2016, 5ʹ.
Alex Prager, La Grande Sortie, 2015, 10ʹ; Lehmann Maupin.
Penny Siopis, The New Parthenon, 2016, 15ʹ26ʺ; Stevenson.

Fri Dec 2 

6pm

Surround Sound artworks in SoundScape Park. A compilation of sound works by Ain Bailey, Zoë Buckman, A.K. Burns, Jonathan Montague, Molly Palmer (supported by The Fountainhead Residency) and Susannah Stark. Soundcloud info

8pm

Best Dressed Chicken in Town. A compilation of artworks by Ana Mendieta, Anri Sala, Derrick Adams with Ramon Silvera, Samson Young, Kudzanai Chiurai, Edgardo Aragón, Luther Price, Catharina van Eetvelde, Ara Peterson, Matt Copson, Martin Creed, Jillian Mayer, György Kovásznai, Tromarama, Kim Gordon, Li Shurui & Li Daiguo, Adam Shecter, Brian Alfred, Dashiell Manley, Haroon Mirza, Zak Ové, Cabelo, Lena Daly, Nate Boyce, Tomislav Gotovac, Rodney Graham, Keren Cytter.

10pm

Double Bill: Liliana Porter and Alfredo Jaar

Alfredo Jaar, Muxima, 2005, 36ʹ; Lelong, Goodman Gallery
Liliana Porter, Actualidades/Breaking News, 2016, 22ʹ47ʺ; Sicardi

Sat Dec 3

6pm

Surround Sound artworks in SoundScape Park. A compilation of sound works by Ain Bailey, Zoë Buckman, A.K. Burns, Jonathan Montague, Molly Palmer (supported by The Fountainhead Residency) and Susannah Stark. Soundcloud info

8pm

Best Dressed Chicken in Town. A compilation of artworks by Ana Mendieta, Anri Sala, Derrick Adams with Ramon Silvera, Samson Young, Kudzanai Chiurai, Edgardo Aragón, Luther Price, Catharina van Eetvelde, Ara Peterson, Matt Copson, Martin Creed, Jillian Mayer, György Kovásznai, Tromarama, Kim Gordon, Li Shurui & Li Daiguo, Adam Shecter, Brian Alfred, Dashiell Manley, Haroon Mirza, Zak Ové, Cabelo, Lena Daly, Nate Boyce, Tomislav Gotovac, Rodney Graham, Keren Cytter.

10pm

Love Songs – Four Films by Wilhelm Sasnal

Wilhelm Sasnal, Love Songs, 2005, 10ʹ02ʺ; Anton Kern.
Wilhelm Sasnal, Kiss, 2002–2003, 4ʹ51ʺ; Anton Kern.
Wilhelm Sasnal, Developing Tank, 2015, 14ʹ22ʺ; Anton Kern.
Wilhelm Sasnal, The River, 2005, 23ʹ10ʺ; Anton Kern.

Daily (Nov 30 – Dec 4)

Miami Beach Convention Center Film Library:

In addition to the outdoor program, visitors will be able to individually (touch) screen over 50 works by artists such as Stephen Dean, Edith Dekyndt, Maggie Lee, Gabriel Lester, Shelly Nadashi, Sophie Nys, João Vasco Paiva, Betye Saar, Jason Simon, Su-Mei Tse and Tuo Wang, as well as all the artist listed in the outdoor programs.

The Film Library is next to the Magazine area and opposite the Salon and Conversations auditorium.

Talks:

Tues Nov 29. 11am-12.30pm

Insights at New World Center: The Music in Film & Sound, Art Basel in Miami Beach
Featuring: David Gryn, Kathryn Mikesell, Molly Palmer and John Kieser
New World Center, SunTrust Pavilion. RSVP/Details & Tickets: www.nws.edu/insights

Sun Dec 4. 2-3pm

Artist Talk – Conversations and Salon: Art Basel’s 2016 program in Miami Beach Convention Center, programmed by Mari Spirito. 

The Artist as Composer
Molly Palmer, Artist, London; Susannah Stark, Artist, London; Kathryn Mikesell, Founder, The Fountainhead Residency and Studios, Miami; Rachel Mason, Artist, Los Angeles. Moderator: William J. Simmons, Lecturer in Art History, City College of New York, New York. With an introduction by David Gryn, Curator of Art Basel’s Film sector and Founder of Daata Editions and Artprojx, London. Art Basel Press Release

Some More Links:

Art Basel Miami Beach

New World Symphony 

Time Out Miami

papermag MEGA guide

Art Basel Film Trailer

Fountainhead Residency

Molly Palmer

Daata Editions

 

The Artist as Composer – in Conversations and Salon series: Art Basel in Miami Beach 2016

In Art, Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Basel Miami Beach, Art Salon, Artists Talk, Daata, daataeditions, Miami, Miami Beach, Music, New World Center, New World Symphony, Sound, SoundScape Park, talk, Uncategorized on 16/11/2016 at 5:45 pm
molly-palmer-fountain_coloradjust1

molly palmer, fountain, 2016

Conversations and Salon: Art Basel’s 2016 program in Miami Beach. Art Basel’s Conversations and Salon series will bring together celebrated artists, galleries, art historians, writers, curators, museum directors and collectors from across the globe, including Alexandre Arrechea, Wafaa Bilal, Francesco Clemente, Mark Dion, Lady Bunny, Julio Le Parc, Glenn Ligon, Tony Matelli, Jill Magid, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Damián Ortega, Bernardo Ortiz, Molly Palmer, Howardena Pindell, HE Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi, Howard Rachofsky and Sun Xun among others.

Sunday, December 4, 2016
2pm to 3pm | Artist Talk | The Artist as Composer
Molly Palmer, Artist, London; Susannah Stark, Artist, London; Kathryn Mikesell, Founder, The Fountainhead Residency and Studios, Miami; Rachel Mason, Artist, Los Angeles. Moderator: William J. Simmons, Lecturer in Art History, City College of New York, New York. With an introduction by David Gryn, Curator of Art Basel’s Film sector and Founder of Daata Editions and Artprojx, London.

The Conversations and Salon talks are programmed by Mari Spirito, Founding Director, Protocinema, Istanbul/New York.

 

info on all the talks art basel press release

notes.

The Art Basel in Miami Beach Film & Sound program in Soundscape Park will be Free to attend on Wednesday, November 30 thru Saturday, December 3. The surround sound program starts at 6pm until 8pm and repeats each of the days, this is a compilation of sound artworks, played nightly during the fair from 6pm until 8pm, featuring artists commissioned to create or reform work into surround sound installations. This year’s artists include: Molly Palmer, Sussanah Stark, Ain Bailey, Zoe Buckman, Jonathan Montague and A.K. Burns.

The Film program starts at 8pm each night with a two hour compilation, repeated daily, of 28 moving image artworks screened under the title ‘Best Dressed Chicken in Town’. Artists include: Ana Mendieta, Anri Sala, Derrick Adams with Ramon Silvera, Samson Young, Kudzanai Chiurai, Edgardo Aragón, Luther Price, Catharina van Eetvelde, Ara Peterson, Matt Copson, Martin Creed, Jillian Mayer, György Kovásznai, Tromarama, Kim Gordon, Li Shurui & Li Daiguo, Adam Shecter, Brian Alfred, Dashiell Manley, Haroon Mirza, Zak Ové, Cabelo, Lena Daly, Nate Boyce, Tomislav Gotovac, Rodney Graham, Keren Cytter.

With a title borrowed from a classic 1970s reggae song by Jamaican dj/singer Doctor Alimantado, this year’s short film program focuses on a selection of international artists who engage with music in a multitude of ways. All the films in this varied and exciting program demonstrate the power of music to attract an audience, keep it engaged, elicit suspense and tug at the heartstrings. Similar to classical symphony works, the order of the films builds up to a crescendo creating an awe-inspiring magic derived from the works in their entirety.

Each night at 10pm there are uniquely featured Film program’s including a Rita Ackermann, Christian Marclay Double Bill on Wednesday, November 30, and a Liliana Porter and Alfredo Jaar Double Bill on the Friday, December 2.

On Thursday, December 1 a feature titled New Parthenon, with works by artists: Ain Bailey & Sonia Boyce, Anna Grenman, Rashid Johnson, Alex Prager, Penny Siopis.

The final screening titled Love Songs is on Saturday, December 3 will include four short films by Polish artist Wilhelm Sasnal.

All the works have a strong relationship with music.

TIME OUT

https://www.timeout.com/miami/things-to-do/art-basel-miami-2016-film

&

_inline-wide_art_basel

INSIGHTS: THE MUSIC in FILM & SOUND – ART BASEL in MIAMI BEACH
NEW WORLD CENTER

Tuesday, November 29, 11:00 am
New World Center, SunTrust Pavilion
Coffee, tea and light pastries will be served
Free with RSVP/ticket

Featuring David Gryn, Kathryn Mikesell, Molly Palmer and John Kieser

RSVP/Tickets: www.nws.edu/insights

David Gryn, the curator of Art Basel’s Film & Sound programming and Director of Daata Editions in conversation with Kathryn Mikesell, founder of The Fountainhead Residency & Studios, Miami, and Molly Palmer, a London based artist commissioned for the Surround Sound program and will be resident at Fountainhead. Hosted by John Kieser, Executive Vice President and Provost of the New World Symphony.

A conversation around the curation of this years Film and Sound programming for Art Basel in Miami Beach and its relationship to music, the New World Center, collaborations between the various organisations, artists, residencies, curators and future plans and aspirations. There will be a chance to join in the conversations and ask questions.

For more information on the 2016 Art Basel events in SoundScape Park: http://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/art-basel-at-soundscape-park/.

 

The Best Dressed Chicken in Town – Film and Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2016 – curated by David Gryn

In Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Fair, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Film, Miami, Miami Beach, Papermag, Uncategorized, Video on 01/11/2016 at 4:30 pm
jillian_mayer_i_am_your_grandma_2011_david_castillo_hires-2

Jillian Mayer, I am your Grandma, 2011 (courtesy the artist and David Castill0 Gallery)

Best Dressed Chicken in Town curated by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions

A compilation of artworks by Ana Mendieta, Anri Sala, Derrick Adams with Ramon Silvera, Samson Young, Kudzanai Chiurai, Edgardo Aragón, Luther Price, Catharina van Eetvelde, Ara Peterson, Matt Copson, Martin Creed, Jillian Mayer, György Kovásznai, Tromarama, Kim Gordon, Li Shurui & Li Daiguo, Adam Shecter, Brian Alfred, Dashiell Manley, Haroon Mirza, Zak Ové, Cabelo, Lena Daly, Nate Boyce, Tomislav Gotovac, Rodney Graham, Keren Cytter.

Screenings daily at 8pm on Weds Nov 30, Thurs Dec 1, Fri Dec 2, Sat Dec 3.

Film & Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2016

Soundscape Park, New World Symphony Center, Miami Beach

artbasel.com/miami-beach/film

With a title borrowed from a classic 1970s reggae song by Jamaican dj/singer Doctor Alimantado, this year’s short film program focuses on a selection of international artists who engage with music in a multitude of ways. All the films in this varied and exciting program demonstrate the power of music to attract an audience, keep it engaged, elicit suspense and tug at the heartstrings. Similar to classical symphony works, the order of the films builds up a crescendo to create an awe-inspiring magic derived from the works in their entirety.

img_7633

Tromarama, Serigala Militia, 2006 (courtesy the artists and Edouard Malingue)

dr-alimantado-best-dressed-chicken

Papermag Mega Guide to Art Basel Miami Beach 2016

More info from the Art Basel Press Release:

Film: Art Basel announces details of its 2016 Film program in Miami Beach.

From November 30 through December 4, 2016, Art Basel will present a premier program of over 50 film and video works by some of today’s most exciting artists from North and South America, Europe, Asia and Africa.

Selected from the show’s participating galleries by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions and Artprojx, this year’s program will include ‘Muxima’, the first film by Chilean-born artist Alfredo Jaar, as well as a silent film about music by Christian Marclay and a new work by Liliana Porter.

The program will also include short films by Edgardo Aragón, Ain Bailey and Sonia Boyce, Cabelo, Kudzanai Chiurai, Martin Creed, Keren Cytter, Kim Gordon, Rodney Graham, György Kovásznai, Rashid Johnson, Li Daiguo, Li Shurui, Jillian Mayer, Ana Mendieta, Haroon Mirza, Ara Peterson, Alex Prager, Anri Sala, Wilhelm Sasnal, Tromarama and Samson Young among many others.

Screenings will take place both in SoundScape Park on the 7,000 square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, as well as on dedicated touchscreen monitors within the Film Library at Art Basel’s show in the Miami Beach Convention Center.

In addition, Marian Masone, New York based film consultant and strategist, has selected ‘Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back’ (2016) directed by Maura Axelrod, for a special screening at the Colony Theatre on Friday, December 2.

Returning for his sixth year, curator David Gryn presents several works that engage with music, including a set of 28 short films screened under the title ‘Best Dressed Chicken in Town’ after a classic 1970s reggae song by Jamaican singer Doctor Alimantado.

The lineup focuses on a selection of international artists who engage with music in a multitude of ways. A ‘Double Bill’ program will pair two film works that share similar themes or approaches to an intense musical score: Rita Ackermann (b. 1968) and Christian Marclay (b. 1955) on Wednesday, and Liliana Porter (b. 1941) and Alfredo Jaar (b. 1956) on Friday.

The late screening on Thursday, December 1 will feature works by sound artist and DJ Ain Bailey (b. 1963), with Sonia Boyce (b.1962), along with pieces by Anna Grenman (b. 1984), Rashid Johnson (b. 1977), Alex Prager (b. 1979) and Penny Siopis (b. 1953).

The final presentation on Saturday, December 3 will include three early films by Polish artist Wilhelm Sasnal (b. 1972), in which he added visual accompaniment to enhance the aural experience, along with a recent work, in which the score directly drives the narrative, replacing spoken words.

Every evening, directly preceding the Film program, surround sound works by Ain Bailey, Zoë Buckman, A.K. Burns, Jonathan Montague, Molly Palmer and Susannah Stark will be presented on the state-of-the-art surround system in SoundScape Park.

In conjunction with the outdoor film screenings, over 50 works have been selected to be shown exclusively within Art Basel’s designated Film Library at the Miami Beach Convention Center. Visitors will be able to individually screen over 50 works by artists such as Stephen Dean, Edith Dekyndt, Maggie Lee, Gabriel Lester, Shelly Nadashi, Sophie Nys, João Vasco Paiva, Betye Saar, Jason Simon, Su-Mei Tse and Tuo Wang. The Film Library is accessible inside the fair halls on touch-screen monitors during show hours. Access with a show entrance ticket.

On Sunday, December 4 at 2pm, Art Basel’s Salon program will feature ‘The Artist as Composer’, a talk between the artists Rachel Manson, Molly Palmer and Susannah Stark, and Kathryn Mikesell, Founder of The Fountainhead Residency and Studios in Miami. The talk will be moderated by William Simmons, author, Hyperallergic, New York, with an introduction by Film and Sound curator David Gryn.

Art Basel entry tickets include admission to Salon.

The Film sector’s Media Partner is Time Out. For the full gallery list for Film, please visit artbasel.com/miami-beach/film

Art Basel Facebook page

Time Out – Things to do at Art Basel in Miami Beach https://www.timeout.com/miami/things-to-do/art-basel-miami-2016-film

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keren Cytter on Reinventing the Rules of Filmmaking – Artspace interview by Loney Abrams

In Andrew Goldstein, Art Basel, Artspace, Daata Editions, Digital, Frieze, keren cytter, Loney Abrams, Uncategorized, Video on 13/10/2016 at 5:35 pm

 

terrorist-of-love-by-keren-cytter-2016

Image Still: Keren Cytter, Terrorist of Love, 2016 (a Free Downloadable Artwork – commissioned by Daata Editions and Artspace)

Keren Cytter on Reinventing the Rules of Filmmaking (or, How to Manipulate Your Audience) by Loney Abrams, Artspace.

It’s difficult to speak about Keren Cytter’s oeuvre holistically, only because she’s such a prolific artist that it’s almost impossible to view it all. The Israeli-born, New York-based filmmaker and writer has produced over 60 videos; published seven books that include novels, poetry, and screenplays; and is also the founder of dance company Dance International Europe Now (aka D.I.E. Now.)… and she’s hasn’t even turned 40.

Like Martin Heidegger’s famous hammer, which only reveals its true nature once it breaks or otherwise fails to function, Cytter’s films employ cliché to set up familiar reference points only to break them down—with poorly dubbed dialogue, fragmented or repetitious story-lines, and subtitles that address the viewer, for example­—and reveal the cinematic conventions that are normally invisible to us.

Cytter’s bag of tricks is chock-full of immediately identifiable tropes, from overly dramatized Hollywood mobster and thriller genre films, that have been delivered so adeptly by directors like Francis Ford Coppola, Alfred Hitchcock, and Quentin Tarantino. But Cytter’s use of these devices don’t quite fit—instead, they feel willfully clumsy and absurd. The 2014 video Rose Garden ends as a young boy is shot with a rifle after stealing a disco ball from the kind of timeless Midwestern dive bar you might expect to see in No Country for Old Men. The boy, refereed to by his bartending parents as both “Scott” and “Stock,” had shot his mother a few seconds before for no discernible reason, and the two murders (of which there are four total in the nine-minute-long film) seemed to bear no relation to one another.

Equally disorienting, the film Four Seasons (2009) starts with a shot of blood dripping onto white tile as a wounded man sits in a bathtub with snow falling around him. After the opening credit sequence, a woman enters the bathroom to ask the man to turn his music down, which she can hear from the apartment next door. The man yells twice, “Stella!” (presumably in reference to Marlon Brando‘s oft-parodied line from A Streetcar Named Desire) and the woman replies, “My name is Lucy, man,” before conversation unfolds casually as if nothing is out of the ordinary. Cytter uses clichés like cinematic readymades, using them to piece together disjointed, fragmented, often absurdist narratives. As a viewer, it sometimes feels as if, through her exaggerated use of cinematic conventions, Cytter is reminding us that we’re watching a film.

Humor, some theorists believe, is experienced when a person’s worldview is turned on its head for a split-second, and then revealed to be only temporary, a joke. Cytter’s films are funny—funny in a smart, dry way that challenges the viewer’s relationship to film. In Cytter’s Video Art Manual, the artist illustrates, quite literally, the filmic conventions and cinematic clichés that she subverts in her work.

The video begins with a young man in a suit sitting at a desk addressing the camera: “In this informal presentation I will try to unfold the great mysteries of new medias and reveal the utopian anxieties of the common man.” By then, we can already assume that this won’t be a straightforward educational film by the way the audio inexplicably changes volume mid-sentence, at times becoming unsynchronized with the actor’s lips. This scene segues into the next with a countdown that only goes from “five…” to “four…,” leading into a montage of news footage that introduces a second narrative, an impending cataclysmic solar flare event, that continues to weave in and out of the rest of the film.

Characters preparing for this imminent environmental catastrophe shift between inhabiting their roles as fictional characters and acting as actors who are playing their characters’ parts. We see one actor selling himself during a casting call, though his rehearsed speech makes it obvious that this too is an act. “You’ve got to take me, I’m multitalented. I speak three languages, sprechen sie Deutsch, y hablo Español,” the actor says before spouting off generic textbook Spanish phrases, while a superimposed subtitle reads, “The performers aren’t as concerned with their acting skills as they are representing familiar characters and situations. Subtitles help to distract the viewer from bad acting and visual mistakes.” Cytter’s films may follow some sort of narrative thrust, but the meat of the work’s content can be found on the bones—the form, the structure that is conventionally out of site but is foregrounded for Cytter. We as viewers are as aware of the off-screen editor, the director, the script writer (who are all, of course, Cytter), as we are the actors onscreen.

For an artist making self-reflexive medium-specific work, Cytter sure does work in a number of media. In 2008, Cytter expanded into the world of theater, founding her dance company, D.I.E. Now. Their first production, The True Story of John Webber and His Endless Struggle With the Table of Content was as much Samuel Beckett as it was “Disney on Ice.” Combining dance, video, music (composed by Cytter herself), and spoken text, the artist worked with non-professional performers—a trademark Cytter carried over from her video work. The production was performed at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in London in 2009.

Cytter’s most recent work is yet another departure from her cinematic mainstays. Terrorist of Love, commissioned by Artspace and Daata Editions (and available as a free download here), is a music video, and uses imagery native to the Internet—two firsts for the artist.  Using a fixed 4K camera, Cytter shot the video in one take, before devising an unconventional video format in post-production solely using key framing, meme-like imagery, and an original soundtrack—an unprecedented approach to video-making in any genre. Here, Artspace’s Loney Abrams talks to the artist about making Terrorist of Love, her self-imposed rules of production, addictive Instagram habits, and the artist’s unfulfilled desire to make her audience feel sad.

Terrorist of Love seems to be the first video you’ve made that is soundtrack driven. How did the idea come about?

I hadn’t made anything like this before. I was in Israel and I was visiting my friend who is a musician, and I asked him for songs. He had this one and I decided to work on it. Then I said, “Okay, we can replace him with performers.” So that’s what we did!

Would you consider it a music video?

I’d say it’s a music video, yeah. [Laughs.] I made up a structure to follow: I will use a very good camera and will shoot two performers on a roof, lip-syncing and casually dancing to the song, and after that, I will zoom into the frame and let the camera move to the shift of the music, on different details of the shot.

What are the lyrics?

Terrorist of Love / Turkish Delight / Search me / Search me. I think it’s a love song, using political words. I made up the choreography.

Have you used meme-type imagery before or is this new too?

On my Instagram yes, but no, never in a video. It doesn’t ever fit with a plot so I could never do it.

Can you talk about your Instagram?

I’m obsessed. I was in rehab for three weeks!

You’re addicted to Instagram?

Yeah, my friend told me I should stop. I should stop. I think I’m really neurotic so that’s why I’m doing it. Instead of biting my nails I’m posting on Instagram. I got addicted, and I’m trying to post less—that’s why I’m erasing posts all the time. Also, I decide to always have less than 1,000.

1,000 posts? 

Images in in general, yeah. Because, to me, it looks vulgar if I have a lot. I also don’t follow people who post too much. That’s why I don’t like myself so much for doing it. I’m much less exclusive when I post a lot.

Sometimes an artist’s work becomes devalued when the artist overproduces. The demand can’t keep up with supply. You talk about your Instagram as if it’s going to lose value if you over-post!

No, it’s not that—I just don’t like people that post a lot. It means they have no life, and as you can see, I have tons of life. [Laughter.] No, I don’t know, I just post images all the time because whenever I have an empty moment I start to correct images and post instead of reading or doing something constructive. Like I told Fabian [an actor in Cytter’s upcoming theater performance], “Let’s go outside and bring the book,” so we brought the book and then I just sat outside posting images.

I’ve been following your Instagram for a while, and I’ve notice you use a lot of hashtags, which become poetic in a sense because they really aren’t useful as hashtags. It seems like sometimes the images on Instagram are secondary to your comments and hashtags.

It’s a lack of confidence sometimes. I think that my images are not good enough so I try to pump them up with the right hashtags. I want to express myself but I think sometimes images are not expressing myself. And sometimes I just don’t have good images! With all the life I have, I don’t have juicy, juicy images! [Laughs.]

In your films, what is more important, the images or the language?

I think the images, generally. The images are not connected very well, so I need lots of language to pull them together. Actually, there is one thing that’s funny with Terrorist of Love. Even if I use a good-quality camera it always comes out really bad, and for this video I used a 4K. So it’s a 4K image, but because you get into the frame, the quality comes out worse than any normal camera. So I said, “Oh, I’m keeping my line of bad images!”

In the first 10 seconds of the video, I thought you were zooming in and out on a still photograph—but then I began to realize that parts of the image were animated, and it was actually a video.

Yeah, well the camera didn’t move the whole time. That was my initial plan: to do everything like voyeurism in the frame.

Yeah, it’s amazing how dynamic you were able to make it without moving the camera. There’s so much going on in the video even though there was really very little activity on set.

Yeah I think people will really enjoy watching it… I think. I like it a lot. It’s going to be cute. It’s like, all Disney.

The scenery is so New York. It’s shot on a rooftop covered in graffiti, overlooking the Manhattan skyline. This kind of scenery is kind of cliché for a certain type of music video—but Terrorist of Love is so not the type of video you’d imagine in this setting.

[Laughs.] Yeah. At first I imagined filming it with the musician who wrote the song at his place in Israel. When we used to work together we got along very well, but when I left Israel 13 years ago, we became a bit like my characters and started drifting apart. I realized I’d be happier to do it not with him, but just to give him the video in the end. So that’s why I imposed everything I planned to do in Israel just on New York. To get into the frame with the sound of the music as the goal.

Your films are really transparent about the medium. So, sure, they’re about some characters, and there’s a storyline, but they’re also about people who are acting in front of a camera, and people who are reading scripts, and people who are making a film—in a way that makes the viewer very aware that they are watching a video. And in more recent years, you’ve also started doing live performances and theater. So I’m wondering how you carry the meta-narrative onto the stage?

Actually it’s quite easy. Now I’m doing a script for a theater we’re going to do. Suzy starts saying, “You might know me from other performances as in—just kidding, I never get the roll.” So you just need to say it and it’s there. It’s just a matter of marking it. You always know that it’s an act. I didn’t invent it, you know so, it’s quite easy— you just play all the time between those worlds.

Audiences obviously have very different expectations when they’re watching film or they’re watching theater. I imagine with film you’re able, through editing, to better direct how your audiences experience the film. You probably can’t do this as easily with theater. Is your audience on your mind when you’re making your work?

I see myself as my audience. When I see a theater play, I’m judging it. So the first thing I had to do when I wrote the text for Suzy is pull one over on the audience, to shock them so that after they stop judging and get into the plot. I like to have a plot but also I like the audience not to forget that they’re watching a play, or watching a film. I hate to waste my time watching other people’s stories. I like when things are not clear to me. I also like that I can feel things—I like to get sad. But I’m not so good at making sad things, I’m better at humor. People are more attached to things if they are feeling sad, so I try to make sad things now, but it’s really embarrassing me.

So your motivation to make sad stories comes not from necessarily having sad stories to tell but wanting people to feel sad?

Yes, exactly. It’d be great if they can’t understand what the story was but they say, “It was so sad.” That would be great because it means I really manipulated them.

In Video Art Manual, the format you’ve set up is similar to a how-to video and then woven into that is this kind of absurdist narrative about an impending apocalyptic solar flare event.

Ah yes.

And then on top of that you’re also bringing the viewer into it by commenting on their experience, and so I’m wondering how you differentiate, or if you differentiate, between narrative and content?

Well for me the content is actually the structure of things, not the narrative itself. The narrative is just an excuse for the audience to keep on following. With the solar flame, I was a bit consumed by it. I read it and I was really worried for my job because they said there will be an electricity power cut, and I said “How can I make videos?” and I said “Oh, I can make drawings.”

I mentioned several times in the video the solar flame and the consequences because that will make the audience keep on watching it, and, for me, that narrative is more interesting than the history of video art. So for me the structures and the frames are much more interesting than the narrative, and the narrative is just for the audience. And it’s also a way for the images to come together so I can smash different things and it will make sense for you because there is some kind of narrative—my excuse for it.

So making a narrative is just an excuse—

To create structures, yeah.

So the narrative gives you an excuse to make a formal film. You also use many different languages in your films and I wonder if that’s an excuse to use subtitles and text as another play on form?

Yeah. Right. Also, you see an Italian movie and it’s not acted well or you don’t get the language so you just say, “Oh, it’s the Italian”—that’s what I think, “Oh, it’s the Italian, Italians are like that.” But when I was in Italy I made a movie there and I asked one of the girls to act like Anna Magnani and she knew exactly what I meant and I realized she was acting a certain way—it’s not like the way Italians act normally, so I was right.

What’s your writing process like? Would you walk us through how you get from point A to B?

It’s depressing actually, I just don’t leave the house. That’s why I’m posting a lot. I have no life so because I need to write all the time. I need to find an idea and until I have an idea I cannot write. It’s better not to write until I have the idea, and then when I start writing I write halfway through and I think it’s fine, and then I realize I cannot continue because the idea is not finished, it doesn’t have enough rules. I need to have more rules and more framing.

What do you mean by rules?

For example I made a Russian movie in Russia with naked people—lots of penises. It’s a very classic movie—the camera doesn’t move. I needed some rules… nine shots with no zoom in and no panning; three acts with three shots in each act. I was in Russia and I was googling “crazy Russians” and I found a crazy image of Russians taping up their apartment with plastic and then flooding it like a swimming pool. My backyard is really fitting for that, actually. That was in my head, that I wanted to turn my backyard into a swimming pool. So I decided to make a movie because of this image.

Because it was with Russians I could do it hardcore, and there were lots of penises and porn and stuff like that. I thought also, because it’s Russians, it’s a bit political because of the power shift I think now in the world. So there were three guys and one girl because I’m concerned about women’s rights, and then it begins actually representing minorities in general. At the end of each act, one of them dies, but keeps on living in the next act. So that was part of the rules.

Another rule was that it needed to be in Russian, and the camera doesn’t move so they need some time to lower themselves to fit into the frame. Maybe there were more things that I forgot. But I need lots of rules just in order to write.

I’m thinking about this device you’re using in Terrorist of Love where you don’t move the camera. The video is static with no cuts. It seems super contemporary, actually, in that a lot of video we’re seeing are coming directly from people’s iPhones. For example, on Facebook Live or Periscope, it’s live-streamed and you can’t make edits. We’re probably getting used to seeing more of these really long takes.

Ah, yeah, that’s cool. Actually in cinema, that’s what counts as a good thing—if the take is long. And subconsciously I think it somehow stays with you. At least it does with me in The Passenger with Jack Nicholson. The last shot is 360 degrees uncut. I like it.

Do you have anything coming up that you’re excited about?

Excited? [Laughs.]

[Laughs.] Do you have anything coming up that you are excited about or not excited about?

My book [A-Z Life Coaching] will come out in two weeks. The book’s cover designer is the designer of the poster from The Lobster, the movie. I met him once and I found his email and he agreed to do it, so it’s really cool. I like it; he invented it.

Also there will be this theater thing we are going to do. We’re going to shoot one part with Colby Keller, who’s a gay porn star, and we are going to show it in the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam in November. I don’t know if I’m excited about this, or I’m afraid. Woah, yeah, I’m not excited yet.

Get your Keren Cytter Free Download Here

https://daata-editions.com/art/video/terrorist-of-love