David Gryn blog

Posts Tagged ‘Video’

Innovating the Future of Film in the Art World – David Gryn interview with Amy Tam – I AM FILM

In Amy Tam, Art Film, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Film, I AM FILM, Uncategorized, Video on 15/03/2018 at 10:03 pm
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Elliot Dodd, The Doctor, 2018

David Gryn is the founding director of Daata Editions, which aims to empower artists working with digital mediums, including video, sound and web via commissioning moving image and sound artworks by leading international artists. He has been the curator of the Film and Sound program at Art Basel in Miami Beach—the largest art fair in the world—for the last seven years.

For the 2018 edition of Independent New York, Sound and Video exhibiting in New York from the 8th-11th March, Gryn was selected to curate a series of artist-created video and sound experiences. The collaboration between Independent and Spring Place featured works by a range of international artists exploring digital mediums, including; Larry Achiampong, Lynda Benglis, BREYER P-ORRIDGE, Keren Cytter, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, David Lynch, Laurel Nakadate, Puppies Puppies, Torbjørn Rødland, and Saya Woolfalk.

I AM FILM Founder and CEO, Amy Tam, interviewed David to discuss Daata Editions and its unique business model, that is successfully supporting and commissioning video artists within the art world.

David, how would you describe Daata Editions (Daata)?

DG: It’s an online marketplace for moving image and sound artworks. My goal is to grow the audience and awareness for this medium, while allowing prospective buyers to access the artworks at any time, from anywhere. Daata has more than 70 artists, with over 300 artworks commissioned for the platform, and all works are released entirely online. The platform works with both leading and emerging artist talents, prominent curators, writers, collectors, art fairs, art magazines, and various art world collaborators including; Amalia Ulman, Takeshi Murata, Tracey Emin, Chloe Wise, Jon Rafman, Rashaad Newsome and many more.

 

Why did you choose to create this type of platform?

DG: Although it’s changing, the art market still tends to prefer object-based artworks. There’s a sense of resistance in galleries, auction houses, and art fairs; to normalise the type of works Daata commissions, because it’s unclear how to make them as commercial as more traditional mediums. People recognise that the industry is moving in this direction and they talk about it, but they won’t engage with it in its current position.

I’m trying to treat it as normally as a painting or sculpture now, instead of waiting for the “right moment.” It’s easy to show digital artworks online, so I started Daata as an answer to that problem. It was about how to encourage all the players—the institutions, the curators, the collectors, the audiences—to treat it more seriously. To me, the solution was the possibility of pushing forward one version of a marketplace, like you might open up a gallery, but online. It is a new way of distributing and showing artists’ moving image, sound, and web-based work. I didn’t realise I was ahead of the curve until I set it up.

How would you explain the way the Daata business model works?

DG: We pay the artists up front and then we distribute the artworks at a price, and we sell the work and give the artist a royalty. It’s inherently structured as a self-sustaining economy. Currently, it’s still philanthropic in its process, and we pay all the artists. If we haven’t paid an artist, we have an equal royalty share.

The business model is effectively saying there’s a value to this work. I’ve realised, to my chagrin, that almost everyone who treats art seriously generally does so when there’s a price point. Art that is for free is very difficult to quantify for almost everybody—other than the artist. I really do value art that isn’t necessarily commercial. But with Daata, I am trying to put forward a case that you can actually “have your cake and eat it, too.” You can have this work viewed and seen for free, and you can also collect it, buy it, and have the HD version for you to play whenever and on whatever device.

Works start at 100-200 dollars, and they go up incrementally until the maximum price of around 6000 dollars, in the video section. This method encourages early purchase, and the longer a work is for sale, the more it grows in value. We’re not trying to set up an auction model, a resale model, or a celebrity artist model. No matter how prominent the artist, the value starts out pretty flat across all parts of the site.

“I can’t base our website on the most famous, most money-making artist, because then it will start becoming a website dominated by the market forces. I wanted to make it a website dominated by the artwork and the artist.”

If you get in early, you can buy major artists and future major artists at a low price, which is exciting. With Daata, we’ve established A model, not THE model. It’s just one way of doing it.

Do you think artists or gallerists (decision-makers) have more power in the sale of art today?

DG: The power of the art fair is dominant. It’s very tilted towards the market position of what pays and drives an art fair’s business model. Galleries are trying to take things into their own hands to change it, but it’s hard. The problem with the relationship with the auction house and the art fair is; it tilts it to top dollar profit, whereas, if you’re supporting all sorts of artists in your gallery business model, you’re interested in the artist and the outcomes—it’s not always about how much money each artist makes.

It’s about how you put that work into a museum and how you grow that artist’s career. That’s often the gallery’s investment—time and costs, and that’s shattered by the art fair model, with many art fairs happening almost every month. Some galleries don’t operate with a great brain anymore, because they have to keep reacting to the next art fairs. The art world needs to alter and turn on its axis better.

Do you think the resistance in the marketplace comes from insufficient demand for these types of works or from the entities controlling what’s available—like art fairs and galleries?

DG: I think it has to be treated as a central cornerstone of an art fair, not as a hidden away sideshow. In my role as Curator of Film & Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach, I work very closely with Art Basel to try and make showing artists moving image and sound, very large and dynamic—luckily, they understand the need to empower the medium.

How does Daata fit into this context?

DG: I think there needs to be many outlets like Daata who can put their resources into supporting artists who make work, and distribute it. I keep coming across entities who want to take over the world, and I just want to take over the project I’m doing and make it the best I possibly can, within finite boundaries and borders. I don’t see what I’m doing with Daata as better or hierarchical, I just see it as being part of an art world jigsaw puzzle.

What has the demand been like in terms of sales of works?

DG: It’s great, it just needs to be more. It’s currently more sales than I’ve ever made in my part of the art world before. But to actually get to a point where there is more revenue to pay the next round of artists and not needing seed funding, it’s still got a couple of years to go. I saw the first two to three years as building and positioning within the art world. I have conversations with certain collectors repeatedly, some people are buying anonymously. There have been some people starting to buy the work more regularly that I don’t know, and they’re coming back.

How has the artist response been in terms of outcomes for the artists commissioned?

DG: The brief for making the artwork is very open and aims to enable the artist to take risk and be experimental. They have said we’ve made them feel more like they’ve been able to try out new things, and that’s been a nice challenge for some artists. They’ve said it’s informed much of their next body of work. Many of them have been shown in artist exhibitions, galleries, museums and art fairs.

As a curator, how do you get introduced to artists?

DG: We don’t have applications. We’re aware of artists in the art world, because I get to see lot of new artists and artworks from art fair prospects, art galleries, artists and so on, and I always look. I also don’t know everything, so it’s also a lot of word of mouth. In the ecosystem of artists, curators, and collectors—we trust each other’s opinions. Not all artists are the right ones for this kind of project. It isn’t a platform for a Hollywood filmmaker to dabble in making an artwork, unless they consider themselves an artist and they’re in the artist/art world ecosystem. It isn’t a platform for all.

However, there’s always room for the quirky collaboration. I have just started distributing a virtual reality project, that is working with several artists to make a composite VR artwork with several different artists in it. We’re willing to take that risk with certain people and projects —as I need to dip my toe into unchartered territories sometimes, just to keep things fresh and open to new potentials.

What would you say have been the main challenges since you started Daata?

DG: My greatest challenge is creating an understanding that this is a very normal medium, and trying to communicate that. I would say everything is a challenge, so it’s exciting. That’s why I set this up—to make a difference within a medium. I try to have a balanced program between artists who are both males and females and across backgrounds. I think about that deeply, so it’s not just a trigger reaction process of signing up the artist who put their hands up first; that’s an easier and lazy way of operating in the art world.

In terms of unexpected positive outcomes, what have you learned in the last three years?

DG: There’s lots of positive things. I don’t see my work just about how great the outcomes are for me. It’s about a project that has the best outcomes for as many people in the process as possible, and that’s always been my interest. That’s where I’m happiest. I guess it’s like I’m always looking under the stone to see what’s there, to make things better. When I work with organisations as dominant as Art Basel, I still always look to see what could make them or my project better for all parties involved. The true and integrity driven people in the art world that I work with, understand collaboration and mutual support for each other. They realise that we’re in the same game together to enhance a better world for art world artists, audience activity, and cultural pursuit.

What is working or not working about the way things work in the film industry, and how is that in contrast or comparison to Daata?

DG: I see the artwork made by an artist as an artwork and the film work made by a filmmaker is a film work. I don’t see a hybridity and a way the two work together. I still say there are many great filmmakers who are great artists—but their art is making film, whereas, the artist makes artwork. An artist will generally make an artwork without a financial position and a filmmaker will probably not make a film unless it’s got funding.

However brilliant they are as filmmakers, a film doesn’t get made because of the costs of the production, whereas an artist can often make an artwork without anyone else involved. If you’re going to make an artwork, you’ve got to make it exist to be an artist. You can’t then call yourself an artist if you haven’t got an artwork. It just doesn’t add up.

In terms of how I work with artists in Daata: I commission based on the reputation of the artist and knowledge of their past work.

“I go into the process trusting the artist to deliver the artwork as they wish. I don’t need drawing boards and proposals, as I believe in the potential of the artist to make the best decisions for their work and aim for outcome that they demand of and for their work.”
I think there are so many filmmakers who are brilliant, and to cast doubt upon them for being an artist is wrong. Usually, I’d say they’re just a great filmmaker. There are just a few that go beyond just being a great filmmaker and I believe they are genuine artists. People like Andrei Tarkovsky, David Lynch, John Waters, and Sophia Coppola. Then, there are people who successfully cross mediums like Wim Wenders and Jim Jarmusch. Sometimes, the artist becomes the Hollywood filmmaker and can lose the strength of their moving image works as an artist. I think it’s hard once you have those budgets and the media spotlight to be the same brilliant artist. The value in an artist who works alone is often in the raw edges, the roughness and the idea generation. Once that dries out and is dominated by the sheen of wealth, it can lose the interest of the greater art world.

For further information on Daata Editions visit: http://daata-editions.com. You can follow Daata Editions on Instagram and Facebook (@daataeditions).

Follow I AM FILM on Instagram (iamfilmofficial). #IAMFILM and Join their list to receive news and views by the Masters of Film. 

https://www.iam.film/press/2018/1/7/david-gryn-interview

 

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Elliot Dodd, The Doctor, just released on Daata Editions

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Elliot Dodd, Independent, Uncategorized on 26/02/2018 at 11:49 am

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Daata Editions are delighted to release the latest artist commission of Elliot Dodd’s The Doctor, with six individual works and one special composite work that features all six works.

‘The Doctor’ forms a six part meditation on masculine bodily exertion, chemical energy and disorientated calm. Alternating between fetishised burnt rubber and fluorescent sugary highs; the films comprise a rhythmic diagram of the palpitating condition of now.

Dodd works with surfaces and techniques which embody the spirit of the global techno-macho-man. He designs sculptural objects, drawings, and moving images that reconfigure the languages of desire, confidence and authority into a new fluid, composite structure.

Recent exhibitions include: ‘Flickering Boundaries’, Madein Gallery, Shanghai; ‘Steps to Aeration’, Tanya Leighton, Berlin; ‘The Manbody’, Zabludowicz Collection, London and ‘Virtually Real’ Royal Academy of Arts, London.

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Daata Editions

Daata Editions at Independent NY & Spring Place

In Daata, Daata Editions, Independent, NADA, New York, Scott Reeder, spring place, The Armory Show, Uncategorized on 18/02/2018 at 9:36 am

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Independent New York and Spring Place Launch a Programme of Artist-Created Audio and Film Installations, Selected by Curator David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions. 

Independent, March 8-11, 2018. Spring Studios, 50 Varick Street, New York, NY 10013.

Daata Editions‘ sound and video curator David Gryn is programming a series of immersive audio experiences and film screenings throughout the public spaces of Independent and Spring Place for the duration of Independent New York in March 2018. The new collaborative initiative will be co-hosted by Spring Place at their Sunken Living Room and the programme will feature a selection of audio and video works by artists from the exhibiting galleries and Daata Editions, transforming the experience of the common areas.

Artists to be featured include: Larry Achiampong, Sofie Alsbo, Maria Antelman, Thora Dolven Balke, Cara Benedetto, Lynda Benglis, BREYER P-ORRIDGE, Jake Chapman, Rob Chavasse, Matt Copson, Keren Cytter, Shezad Dawood, Brice Dellsperger, Elliot Dodd, Graham Dolphin, Alexandra Drewchin (eartheater), Tracey Emin, FlucT, Ed Fornieles, Luke Fowler & Sue Tompkins, Leo Gabin, Douglas Gordon, Brent Green, Joseph Grigely, Eloise Hawser, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, Lina Lapelyte, David Lynch, Laurel Nakadate, Rashaad Newsome, Tin Ojeda, Hannah Perry, puppies puppies, Torbjørn Rødland, Scott & Tyson Reeder (feat: The Fall), Ariana Reines, Marina Rosenfeld, Richard Sides, John Skoog, Scott Treleaven, Stephen Vitiello, Saya Woolfalk and more.

Institute 193 – playlist artists: Georgiana B. Pettway and Creola B. Pettway, Three Legged Race, Street Gnar, Idiot Glee, The Smacks, Lonnie Holley, Jules Trakker (Resonant Hole), Ben Sollee, Silas House, Matt Duncan, Anna & Elizabeth, Ben Durham and Robert Beatty, Jeanne Vomit-Terror, Rayna Gellert, Phillip March Jones, ATTEMPT, Morgan O’Kane, Groove Merchants, Louis Zoellar Bickett II

Galleries include: 303 Gallery, Canada, Chapter NY, Elizabeth Dee, Nagel Draxler, Andrew Edlin Gallery & Institute 193, INVISIBLE-EXPORTS, François Ghebaly, The Modern Institute, Carlos / Ishikawa, Neue Alte Brücke, Night Gallery, The Sunday Painter, Air de Paris, Peres Projects, Cheim & Read, Tilton Gallery & Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, untilthen, VI, VII.

BUY THE DAATA EDITIONS ARTWORKS FEATURED AT INDEPENDENT HERE

Image: Scott Reeder, Nodes, 2017

FlucT: The psychological thriller of Evidence, now on Daata Editions

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, FlucT, Performance, Uncategorized, Video on 22/10/2017 at 12:40 pm

FlucT – The psychological thriller of Evidence 

Now available to buy on Daata Editions

The subjects of these short texts feature FlucT. The table of contents is in itself hermetic. In 6 episodes, Monica & Sigrid traverse the psychological thrill within the manipulative isolation of a game. They flaunt evidence in the effective nature of capital as it sings the absurdity of our behavior and our performitivity. They include birdcages and bitches; the underlying systems that control us, warrior tactics toward empathy and the pregnancy of their relationship. The psychological thriller of Evidence can be considered a guidebook to the incessant questioning of reality that FlucT sees as the task of performance.

Monica Mirabile and Sigrid Lauren have been performing as FlucT since 2011, presenting a hybrid collaboration of radical choreography, confrontational performance art, collaborative practice and pure magic. Before entering into a performance, each individual places a spell of protection over each other, allowing themselves to push their physicality to the max while remaining mindful of their partner’s saftey. Their dance practice has been described as “violently intimate” and their performances often confront and challenge not only the space between their bodies, but between the performers and audience. Most works involve audio tracks designed by the artists, leading to a further intimacy and connection between the performance, performers, and audience. This work, “Main Tool as a Dummy,” reflects the rhythm and nonlinear narration of their performance work.

FlucT by Whitney Mallet in Cura magazine

 

Daata x citizenM Tower of London Breakfast & Talk – Oct 3rd

In citizenM, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Tower of London, Uncategorized, Zabludowicz on 22/09/2017 at 9:43 pm

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Please join us at the citizenM Tower of London for a Daata Editions breakfast & talk on Tuesday October 3rd, 9.30-10.30am. Please RSVP to art@citizenM.com

Daata and citizenM have joined forces to launch a series of artworld talks – kicking off with David Gryn and Anita Zabludowicz talking about collecting artist digital mediums, the artworld and much more. This morning celebrates Frieze Week in London and Daata exhibiting at Sunday Art Fair Oct 5-8.

See the Full Invite: Art Breakfast Invite citizenM Tower of London

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New Daata Editions Artist Releases – Now Available

In Artune, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Expo Chicago, Jeremy Couillard, Lu Yang, Photofairs, Shanghai, Societe Berlin, Uncategorized, yours, mine & ours on 04/09/2017 at 8:37 am
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Jeremy Couillard on Daata Editions

Coinciding with Daata Editions collaboration with PHOTOFAIRS | Shanghai – there are two new artist releases, the new FREE DOWNLOAD by Lu Yang and six new short artworks by Jeremy Couillard.

Jeremy Couillard’s new commissioned artwork ‘Suite for Absynth in D minus USB 1008’ is curated by yours, mine & ours gallery, and available for purchase on Daata Editions from Sept 7.

The release coincides with Daata Editions at PHOTOFAIRS Shanghai (Sept 7), EXPO CHICAGO (Sept 13) and then a dedicated screening evening on Sept 18 at Ludlow House NYC featuring the artwork, along with Jeremy Couillard, Patton Hindle and David Gryn in conversation.

‘Suite for Absynth in D minus USB 1008’: Titles and digitally altered music from Bach’s Cello Suite No. 2 in D minor BWV 1008 form the backdrop for each environment where a rat duck man named Uncle Sad Bedroom travels through fantastical video game versions of different moons in our solar system trying to find his place.

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Lu Yang, LuYang Interactive Hearse, 2017

LuYang Interactve Hearse, 2017 by Lu Yang 

The Daata Editions Commission, powered by Artune

Released online and featured at PHOTOFAIRS | Shanghai on Sept 7  

陆扬的互动灵车 – 2017年陆扬作品

Daata Editions委约作品, 由Artune赞助支持, PHOTOFAIRS影像上海艺术博览会

Conversations: Friday, September 8, 2.30 – 3.15 pm

PHOTOFAIRS | Shanghai at the Shanghai Business Center

What Next?  Photography, Moving Image and the Internet

Introduction: Jefferson Hack (CEO, NOWNESS)
Moderator: Robin Peckham 
Speakers: David Gryn (Director, Daata Editions), Lu Yang (Artist) and Michael Xufu Huang (Collector & Co-founder, M-Woods Museum, Beijing)

David Gryn, Michael Xufu Huang in conversation with artist Lu Yang, moderated by Robin Peckham, exploring the relationship between photography, moving image and internet based art.

 

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Lu Yang Interactive Hearse – the Daata Editions Commission powered by Artune in collaboration with PHOTOFAIRS | Shanghai

In Artune, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Lu Yang, Photofairs, Shanghai, Societe Berlin, Uncategorized on 09/08/2017 at 9:05 pm

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PHOTOFAIRS | Shanghai has just announced the launch of the Daata Editions Commission powered by Artune, The Social Platform for a Global Art Community, at the fourth edition of the fair.

This year’s commission will be created by contemporary Chinese artist, Lu Yang. The new work, ‘Lu Yang Interactive Hearse’ will be premiered at the fair and available on the Daata Editions website as a Free Download, in response to a flourishing interest from the Asian Art Market to engage with the digital medium.

Lu Yang (born 1984, Shanghai) is a contemporary artist whose groundbreaking multimedia works explore themes such as neuroscience, mortality and religion. Yang’s work “Moving Gods” (2015) was featured in the China Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Lu Yang is represented by Societe, Berlin

Daata Editions commissions video, sound, poetry and web art, presenting and distributing the artworks online for purchase as limited-edition, digital downloads. Previous commissions include works by both international established and emerging artists including: Sue de Beer, Ed Fornieles, Hannah Perry, Jon Rafman and Amalia Ulman. There are over 70 artists and almost 300 artworks on the platform.

ARTUNE is The Social Platform for a Global Art Community: Follow your favorites, receive latest insights, trade works of art and discover talented artists. Artune is a new social platform aiming to connect people interested in Art, from artists, art lovers to art galleries, auction houses and art fairs.  The platform will allow its users not only to connect with art friends but also to share art moments, read art news, trade works of art and discover upcoming talents. Artune is coming for IOS and Android mobile application, and everyone can easily download free of charge at the Artune website.

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Label Dalbin presents Table.Video at Design Miami/ Basel

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Design Miami, Design Miami Basel, Label Dalbin, Table.Video, Uncategorized, Video on 07/06/2017 at 9:44 pm

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Label Dalbin is proud to present videos from Daata Editions inside Table.Video at Design Miami/ Basel. This innovative table displays videos and images conceived by artists and uploaded by the user. It combines the classic function of furniture with a « digital canvas » of still and moving images in the heart of your living or exhibition space. 

Daata Editions commissions artist video, sound, poetry and web. This new and innovative way to collect art is designed specifically to be a native platform to a new generation of artists who work with moving image and sound. Limited edition artworks can be viewed and acquired as digital downloads.

Label Dalbin produces videos, installations, and performances at the interface between music and the visual arts for cultural institutions and private collections. Label Dalbin also conceives innovative audiovisual installation for interior design.

Visit Design Miami/ Basel
Booth C9, Hall 1 Süd, Messe Basel, Switzerland

From June 13th to 18th, 2017

More Info:

https://www.table.video/daata-editions

http://basel2017.designmiami.com/

‘Accessibility and value no longer need to be at odds’ – Whitney Mallet, a new Foreword for Daata Editions

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, NY Times, Uncategorized, Whitney Mallett on 02/06/2017 at 1:41 pm

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Accessibility and value no longer need to be at odds

A new Foreword for Daata Editions by Whitney Mallett

Trying to sell video art drove Gerry Schum to suicide. In the early 1970s, the German artist was a pioneer of the limited edition model, selling both limited and unlimited edition moving-image works through his Düsseldorf videogalerie. While it was visionary, the venture only lasted a year and a half. Low demand from institutions and private collectors combined with high overhead costs forced Schum to shutter the gallery in late 1972. He took his life a few months later in March 1973.

Though it doesn’t usually lead to such tragic ends, selling new media work can still be frustrating today. Forty-five years later, it remains true that there is not the same collector base for video works as there is for painting and sculpture. New media works, of course, aren’t as tactile as other art objects, and the market’s growing pains are usually blamed on digital art’s infinite reproducibility. Granted, it’s a simpler proposition to exchange a unique object for an agreed upon sum of money, it’s still not immediately obvious why a Giacometti bronze sculpture should be worth over $100 million dollars just because it’s something you can run your fingers over. Value in the art market is based on a slew of subjective and socially-determined factors. There’s no real reason why digital works can’t accrue the same values as oil paintings, there just needs to be a culture that encourages investing in them and a system that regulates their authorship and ownership, two things Daata Editions is strengthening through their platform.

In this smartphone-saturated world, people are very familiar with screen-based emotional experiences. The premise of communing with an art work based in bits and bytes is not as alien as it might have been a few decades ago. But as content has become ubiquitous online, it’s also been devalued. We started expecting for free the same works we used to pay to read in a magazine or watch in a movie theater, and seduced by the promise of viral fame, we started producing content for likes instead of pay while social media corporations profit from our toil. Understanding this ecosystem, Daata has devised a platform that shares works freely online and gets the artists paid. This is made possible by a tiered system where the work is shared online with a small watermark (there’s an aural equivalent for sound works as well) while collectors purchase the unaltered version.

In another era, video artists had to weigh the advantages of popularity and scarcity. American artist Cheryl Donegan recalls in an interview with The New York Times, “People would say they saw a tape of mine in Berlin, which I didn’t know about, and it freaked me out, but then I thought that sharing my work could also make it more popular.” With the dawn of the web, models of sharing video art like UbuWeb emerged which facilitated a wider viewership of material but through a non-commercial platform, giving digital life to pre-digital video works which were out-of-print. Daata Editions keeps in mind these art-loving audiences who would watch bootleg VHS tapes or peruse UbuWeb for mind-bending fare. All the works are available online at no cost. This decision also suggests a keen understanding of how a work’s popularity can increase its value, benefitting the collectors who have invested in buying a limited edition. Accessibility and value no longer need to be at odds.

Daata Editions model selling limited runs of digital works (video, sound, web, and poetry) through their online platform continues to grow the culture of investing in and appreciating new media art. They are making the purchase of screen-based works attractive to a wider audience of collectors while supporting the artists working in these mediums, making valuable contributions to building a sustainable market.

Whitney Mallett is a writer and filmmaker based in New York. She’s an editor of the digital platform Topical Cream

Sue de Beer on Daata Editions

In Art Basel, Barcelona, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Film, LOOP, Marianne Boesky, Sue de Beer, Uncategorized, Video on 22/05/2017 at 4:01 pm

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Daata Editions has just announced the release of four new artworks by Sue de Beer specially commissioned for the platform.

This poem is me and it’s nothing but words about you I hope you like it (1 & 2)
Make up / sound test for a were-wolf film
(1 & 2)

Sue is a recent recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and is represented by Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York. Sue de Beer’s artwork release on Daata coincides with the LOOP Fair, Barcelona and Art Basel in June.

Khary Simon, a creative director and publisher based in New York, interviewed Sue de Beer on her 4 films for Daata Editions.

Are the films intended to be presented in a specific order?

No. They are separate but connected. I do watch them in the order of 1, 2, 3, 4. I cut them in the order of 1, 2, 3, 4. The first two naturally connect, and the last two naturally connect. So do 1 and 4. So do 2 and 3.

Is beauty fragile and or dangerous?

Yes. Fragile.

What about terror can be erotic or beautiful?

Everything.

Do you cherish objects of girlhood or wish we did?

Yes.

What is the origin of titles 1 and 2?

This poem is me
and it’s nothing but
words about you
I hope you like it

It’s from a Dennis Cooper poem – one that he contributed to my first catalogue. I think it’s beautiful. Shifts around the watcher and the watched.

Sue de Beer’s work is located at the intersection between film and installation, sculpture and photography. Solo exhibitions include the Kunst Werke, Berlin, the Whitney Museum of American Art at Altria, the MuHKA Museum in Antwerp, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions in Los Angeles, The Park Avenue Armory, New York, as well as at Marianne Boesky Gallery.

The artworks start from $200. http://daata-editions.com

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