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Jane Bustin, Fühler at Leslie, Berlin 22 June

In Art, Berlin, Ceramics, Copper, Copperfield, Gallery, Jane Bustin, Leslie, Paintings, Poppy Bowers, Uncategorized, Whitworth on 18/06/2017 at 11:41 am
3D work by Jane Bustin

Rehearsal II, copper, acrylic, oxides, cloth
80cm x 50 cm overall, Jane Bustin, 2015

Jane Bustin

Fühler

Opening: 22.6.17, 6 pm
Exhibition: 23.6.17 – 20.7.17

Leslie

Bergfriedstraße 20
10969 Berlin

http://lesliegallery.de/

Since the 18th century, European philosophers have distinguished our capacity to feel subjectively from our ability to think rationally. We are sentient beings. As the late neurologist and author Oliver Sacks claimed, ‘perception is never purely in the present – it has to be drawn on experience of the past’. Jane Bustin’s exhibition Fühler, to have feelers or sensors about a given subject, calls on this capacity.

Bustin’s approach to painting foregrounds a conscious experience of material surface and texture. Although abstract, her works are evocations of people and histories. They are grounded in a range of intellectual sources, primarily European modernist poetry, design and literature as well as theology and philosophy. Such concepts are given physical expression through her intuitive arrangements of materials. Oil, dyed silk, porcelain, woven cloth, polished copper, tulle and ceramic glazes are just some of the media used to give shape and feeling to philosophical ideas. Born out of the tactile, her works are Fühler; they are imbued with a sensory memory and resonate with emotion.

Four works in the show, Apres II, Nijinsky I, Nijinksy’s Windows and Rehearsal II, pay tribute to the radical Russian ballet dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinksy (1890-1950). Rising to prominence as part of the belle epoch, Nijinksy combined depth and intensity of expression with symmetry to pioneer new stylistic ideas in modern dance, echoed in the compositional balance of Bustin’s three textural diptychs.

In Après II textile becomes a stand-in for the body and the memory of its physical activity. It takes its cue from Nijinsky’s choreography of the ballet L’apres midi d’un Faun in 1912, where the movement of fabric is used as a metaphor for sexual desire and physical exhaustion. Like most of Bustin’s works the scale is of human proportions. Hung quite low, Apres II sits on the wall around the height of the artist’s heart.

Elsewhere, earlier works in the exhibition include Christina the Astonishing, part of a series referencing the iconography of female saints and Tablet I, Tablet III and Tablet IV, evoking archaic forms of communication. Combining sheets of paper from both old and new notebooks, they prompt memories of the past alongside thoughts of the future.

Refusing to be filmed during his lifetime, Nijinsky strongly believed his performances should only be experienced live. Likewise Bustin prefers her works to be encountered in real time under the honest inconsistency of natural light. Like the tip of antennae, one’s eyes should roam over surface, roll over folds, shift focus through diaphanous layers and peer into copper reflections. Her works call upon an understanding of Fühler and our capacity to feel as sentient beings. They ask us to look again.

Text by Poppy Bowers, Curator, Whitworth Gallery, Manchester

Exhibited works

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Label Dalbin presents Table.Video at Design Miami/ Basel

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Design Miami, Design Miami Basel, Label Dalbin, Table.Video, Uncategorized, Video on 07/06/2017 at 9:44 pm

TABLE

Label Dalbin is proud to present videos from Daata Editions inside Table.Video at Design Miami/ Basel. This innovative table displays videos and images conceived by artists and uploaded by the user. It combines the classic function of furniture with a « digital canvas » of still and moving images in the heart of your living or exhibition space. 

Daata Editions commissions artist video, sound, poetry and web. This new and innovative way to collect art is designed specifically to be a native platform to a new generation of artists who work with moving image and sound. Limited edition artworks can be viewed and acquired as digital downloads.

Label Dalbin produces videos, installations, and performances at the interface between music and the visual arts for cultural institutions and private collections. Label Dalbin also conceives innovative audiovisual installation for interior design.

Visit Design Miami/ Basel
Booth C9, Hall 1 Süd, Messe Basel, Switzerland

From June 13th to 18th, 2017

More Info:

https://www.table.video/daata-editions

http://basel2017.designmiami.com/

‘Accessibility and value no longer need to be at odds’ – Whitney Mallet, a new Foreword for Daata Editions

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, NY Times, Uncategorized, Whitney Mallett on 02/06/2017 at 1:41 pm

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Accessibility and value no longer need to be at odds

A new Foreword for Daata Editions by Whitney Mallett

Trying to sell video art drove Gerry Schum to suicide. In the early 1970s, the German artist was a pioneer of the limited edition model, selling both limited and unlimited edition moving-image works through his Düsseldorf videogalerie. While it was visionary, the venture only lasted a year and a half. Low demand from institutions and private collectors combined with high overhead costs forced Schum to shutter the gallery in late 1972. He took his life a few months later in March 1973.

Though it doesn’t usually lead to such tragic ends, selling new media work can still be frustrating today. Forty-five years later, it remains true that there is not the same collector base for video works as there is for painting and sculpture. New media works, of course, aren’t as tactile as other art objects, and the market’s growing pains are usually blamed on digital art’s infinite reproducibility. Granted, it’s a simpler proposition to exchange a unique object for an agreed upon sum of money, it’s still not immediately obvious why a Giacometti bronze sculpture should be worth over $100 million dollars just because it’s something you can run your fingers over. Value in the art market is based on a slew of subjective and socially-determined factors. There’s no real reason why digital works can’t accrue the same values as oil paintings, there just needs to be a culture that encourages investing in them and a system that regulates their authorship and ownership, two things Daata Editions is strengthening through their platform.

In this smartphone-saturated world, people are very familiar with screen-based emotional experiences. The premise of communing with an art work based in bits and bytes is not as alien as it might have been a few decades ago. But as content has become ubiquitous online, it’s also been devalued. We started expecting for free the same works we used to pay to read in a magazine or watch in a movie theater, and seduced by the promise of viral fame, we started producing content for likes instead of pay while social media corporations profit from our toil. Understanding this ecosystem, Daata has devised a platform that shares works freely online and gets the artists paid. This is made possible by a tiered system where the work is shared online with a small watermark (there’s an aural equivalent for sound works as well) while collectors purchase the unaltered version.

In another era, video artists had to weigh the advantages of popularity and scarcity. American artist Cheryl Donegan recalls in an interview with The New York Times, “People would say they saw a tape of mine in Berlin, which I didn’t know about, and it freaked me out, but then I thought that sharing my work could also make it more popular.” With the dawn of the web, models of sharing video art like UbuWeb emerged which facilitated a wider viewership of material but through a non-commercial platform, giving digital life to pre-digital video works which were out-of-print. Daata Editions keeps in mind these art-loving audiences who would watch bootleg VHS tapes or peruse UbuWeb for mind-bending fare. All the works are available online at no cost. This decision also suggests a keen understanding of how a work’s popularity can increase its value, benefitting the collectors who have invested in buying a limited edition. Accessibility and value no longer need to be at odds.

Daata Editions model selling limited runs of digital works (video, sound, web, and poetry) through their online platform continues to grow the culture of investing in and appreciating new media art. They are making the purchase of screen-based works attractive to a wider audience of collectors while supporting the artists working in these mediums, making valuable contributions to building a sustainable market.

Whitney Mallett is a writer and filmmaker based in New York. She’s an editor of the digital platform Topical Cream