David Gryn blog

Phillips and Daata Editions Announce Partnership to Commission Artists

In artnet, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Digital, digital art, megan newcombe, Phillips, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 09/02/2019 at 10:54 am
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Image: Puck VerkadeLUCY LIVE, Courtesy of the artist and Daata Editions

Phillips and Daata Editions Announce Partnership to Commission Digital Artists

Works to be Exhibited at Phillips in New York and Sold Through Daata Editions Online Platform

PRESS RELEASE

8 FEBRUARY 2019 – Daata Editions and Phillips are delighted to announce a partnership this spring leading to the commissioning and exhibition of two new digital artworks. The recipients will comprise of artists with practices that include video, sound, and performance. The commissioned artworks will premiere and be exhibited at Phillips in April, alongside a selection of other works by Daata artists, after which they will be offered for sale through daata-editions.com.

Founded in 2015, Daata provides a simplest way to discover and collect digital artworks, serving as a native platform to a new generation of artists working with moving image and sound. The works by both emerging and leading contemporary artists can be downloaded at any time on any screen or device.

Artnet News: Is There a Market for Digital Art? Phillips Is Partnering With Daata Editions to Find Out

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David Gryn, Founder of Daata Editions, said, “Since its founding, Daata has supported artists working in digital media through the commissioning of new artworks. We are delighted to work with Phillips on this initiative, which aims to empower collectors in understanding the potential value of artworks made via digital media, as well as showcase artists who are disrupting the field through their unique vision and innovation.”

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Megan Newcome, Phillips’ Director of Digital Strategy, said, “The partnership with Daata is an exciting opportunity for Phillips to continue to support the digital artist community while empowering collectors to see the potential in acquiring non-object based artworks that have historically been considered complicated to own.”

There will be a strong educational component to the partnership, with panel discussions that will aim to explore new technologies and new distribution models that are making this field of collecting increasingly viable.

The two artists who will receive these commissions will be announced in March.

ABOUT DAATA EDITIONS

Daata Editions commissions artist video, sound, poetry, and web and is acknowledged worldwide as a leading platform for commissioning and exhibiting digital artworks, working with both emerging and established artists. Daata Editions launched in May 2015 presenting works by 18 artists. Available as limited editions, Daata now has 350+ artworks by 80 artists that can be viewed and acquired as digital downloads through the website. Daata Editions artworks form part of the Hammer Museum Contemporary Collection, US; the Julia Stoschek Collection, Germany; KIASMA, Finland and the Zabludowicz Collection, UK. Upcoming Daata collaborations include Phillips, MOCAD Detroit and NeueHouse, New York.

For more information visit https://daata-editions.com/

ABOUT PHILLIPS

Phillips is a leading global platform for buying and selling 20th and 21st century art and design. With dedicated expertise in the areas of 20th Century and Contemporary Art, Design, Photographs, Editions, Watches, and Jewellery, Phillips offers professional services and advice on all aspects of collecting. Auctions and exhibitions are held at salerooms in New York, London, Geneva, and Hong Kong, while clients are further served through representative offices based throughout Europe, the United States and Asia. Phillips also offers an online auction platform accessible anywhere in the world. In addition to providing selling and buying opportunities through auction, Phillips brokers private sales and offers assistance with appraisals, valuations, and other financial services.

Visit www.phillips.com for further information.

Artnet News: Is There a Market for Digital Art? Phillips Is Partnering With Daata Editions to Find Out

Please find the full Phillips Press Release attached and follow link to Press Images

PRESS CONTACTS:

Anna Mustonen, Daata Editions

anna@daata-editions.com +44 7738098931

Jaime Israni, Senior Public Relations Specialist, Phillips

jisrani@phillips.com +1 212 940 1398

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Aalto and Daata present Animal Charms

In Aalto, Aalto University, Animal Charms, Art Video, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Finland, Helsinki, Jakob Kudsk Steensen, Ollie Dook, Puck Verkade, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 17/12/2018 at 9:11 pm

 

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Aalto Studios and Daata Editions are excited to announce their first collaborative exhibition taking place in January 2019.

ANIMAL CHARMS consists of newly commissioned artworks by Ollie Dook, Jakob Kudsk Steensen and Puck Verkade recently presented at NADA Miami during the Art Basel Miami Beach week of events.

Aalto Studios Gallery, Otakaari 7, 0210 Espoo, Finland

Exhibition: 17 January – 15 February 2019
Private View: 16 January 2019 5-7pm

More information coming soon!

https://daata-editions.com/

Image: Puck Verkade, LUCY LIVE, courtesy of the artist and Daata Editions

The artwork is a digital file, yes by Pau Waelder – a new Foreword for Daata Editions

In Art Basel, Art Video, Collecting, Collector, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, NADA, Pau Waelder, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 16/11/2018 at 11:26 am

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The artwork is a digital file, yes

by Pau Waelder

A new Foreword for Daata Editions

When considering how to collect digital art, we come across two preconceptions: what an artwork must be and what digital files are worth. First, it is commonly assumed that an artwork is an object with unique attributes, original, and irreplaceable. The object routinely goes from the artist’s studio to the gallery, where it is acquired by a collector. There is no doubt that it is always the same object that trades hands, and it is finally the collector who decides where the artwork is placed and who has access to it. Conceptual and performance art has challenged this notion again and again, but the artwork always finds its way into the market and the collector’s home in the form of a more or less stable object. Thus, if an artwork (a) is not an object, (b) can be copied, (c) can be accessed or experienced beyond the control of its owner(s), and/or (c) requires a computer, software and display to be at all perceivable, some may find it “difficult,” “challenging,” or even not worth collecting. This relates to the second preconception.

Our computers, tablets and smartphones are constantly storing digital files. Most of them we have created ourselves, others we have downloaded for free or for a fee. They fill the device’s storage space and force us to either copy them to other devices, store them in the cloud or delete them. Digital files are therefore constantly moved around, copied and erased, both a necessity and a burden. In most cases, we don’t know what to do with them, they just linger in folders and hidden directories until detected by a cleanup app or simply obliterated when the device that stores them reaches the end of its service life. Digital files, therefore, tend to be considered expendable in the sense that there should always be another copy somewhere. In fact, a growing segment of the entertainment industry relies on selling access to content on digital files that we temporarily store in our devices and swiftly remove when we are done watching the film, tv series, or documentary; listening to the song or podcast; reading the book, graphic novel or magazine. Many times, the file is not even downloaded, it is streamed and thus disappears the moment it is not used anymore, without leaving a trace. When we pay for the content, we either rely on it being safely stored by the provider and always conveniently accessible or we just want to experience it and never care what happens to it afterwards, because there will always be more, newer content ready to be clicked on.

My point is that artworks and digital files seem to be incompatible, due to how we tend to conceive artworks and our daily experience with digital files. Artworks are forever, digital files are ephemeral. Artworks are unique objects, digital files are immaterial worthless copies. However, an artwork does not need to be an object. In fact, a painting is not an object, it is an image that becomes a physical object because the pigment needs to be placed on a surface and canvases make it easier than walls to create, move around and sell the images. An artwork created in a digital format (a video, sound, jpeg, gif, 3D animation, browser-based piece or what have you) is not only always a copy but also the result of a software interpreting a file on a certain display, so every time it is experienced it turns out to be, in a way, a unique performance. Of course, one has to make sure that the software works with the file and that the display shows the piece as intended, but that’s all part of the artwork being something other than a static, physical object –which would nevertheless require certain conditions of placement, lighting, humidity and so forth. Finally, the artwork may be available to others even if it is safely at home and a certificate of authenticity, kept in the safe, states that no one else owns it. Artworks have a life of their own as they are viewed in exhibitions, reproduced in photographs and videos, distributed in magazines, books and blogs. Most of the art we know and love, we have never owned and will never own – even big collectors know and love much more art than they have bought. A large part of that art we have seen through reproductions, mostly on screens. It is still part of us, and for those who were lucky, smart or powerful enough to buy it, the more people who feel that the artwork is part of them, the better. For what good is it to own something that no one else knows about, that none can appreciate, that cannot be shared?

Digital art allows us to own and at the same time share an artwork – not only its reproduction. This can raise some eyebrows and insecurities. It may be argued that if the artwork is available elsewhere or that it can be copied, it loses its value. However, in addition to what I have already stated about the nature of a digital file, let us consider what Nelson Goodman found to be the difference between an original artwork and a forgery: its history of production. A digital artwork that has been purchased from a reputable source with a valid registry of authenticity has a history of production that can be established from the artist to the collector. No matter how many copies of the artwork may circulate, only the collector – or collectors if the artwork is editioned– can claim ownership and, more importantly, become part of the history of the artwork. This is not just provenance, which will matter to the next owner, but an active involvement in the existence of the artwork, its relevance and also in supporting the work of the artist. This is where Daata Editions comes in. Daata commissions art that is sold through its online platform in limited editions. The artists are paid to produce artworks that anyone can buy with a few clicks. The buyer can download the artwork and store it in her computer, on the cloud, wherever, make copies and display them on any device she owns. The rest of us can see the same artwork – watermarked – on the platform, appreciate it, maybe feel the urge to own it too. But we won’t be part of the artwork’s history, only those who bought it do. And those who are lucky or smart enough get the first edition.

Pau Waelder is a curator, writer and researcher whose work focuses on contemporary art and new media.

https://daata-editions.com/