David Gryn blog

Saya Woolfalk – All the colours of a rainbow

In Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Fair, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, digital art, Expo Chicago, POSTmatter, Saya Woolfalk, Uncategorized, Video Art, wetransfer on 15/09/2016 at 8:40 am

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ALL THE COLOURS OF THE RAINBOW

by POSTmatter Editors | September 7, 2016

A CONVERSATION WITH SAYA WOOLFALK ON CULTURAL MIXES, UTOPIA AND HER NEW COLLABORATION WITH DAATA EDITIONS AND POSTMATTER. “I AM DEEPLY INTERESTED IN PLAY AND THE POSSIBILITIES THAT EMERGE THROUGH PROCESSES AND I TRY TO BRING TOGETHER THINGS THAT MAY NOT GENERALLY BE FUSED TOGETHER”

Saya Woolfalk is a New York-based, Japanese-born interdisciplinary artist. Using science fiction, fantasy, anthropology and semiotics, she explores the alternative utopian possibilities of identity. Melding dance, video, animation and sculpture in a number of ongoing projects, she offers fantastical narratives of cultural hybridity to expand traditional visions of the present and ideas of the future.
In a recent public performance piece that took over New York’s Fulton Centre, she paired performance with interactive app technology to offer passers by a glimpse into her kaleidoscopic imagination. It is one in a series of pieces that builds the story of the Empathics, a fictional race of women who Woolfalk is writing as unbound by the limits of genetics.
In collaboration with Daata Editions, we preview one artwork from Woolfalk’s upcoming 2016 series Color Mixing Machine. In it, she continues to build the story of the Empathics through ritualistic digital creations that reimagine what it means to be human. The full set of artworks will run in POSTmatter from 29th September, and are available to buy on Daata Editions, an innovative digital platform representing contemporary moving image and sound artists. Our preview and interview with Woolfalk is presented in association with WeTransfer.

PM: What is the mission of your fictional future female species, the Emphatics, and the space they inhabit, ‘No Place’?
SW: ‘No Place’ is a project I worked on from 2006 to 2008 with filmmaker and anthropologist Rachel Lears. The No Placeans are plant humans from the future who change gender and colour, transform into the landscape when they die, and repurpose refuse into usable technologies. The Empathics are people in the present who establish something called the Institute of Empathy (IoE) to study No Place. The IoE encounters a grouping of No Placean bones and fungus on the bones stimulates their physiological mutation and cultural transformation. This mutation allows the Empathics to easily cross species by integrating foreign genetic material into their DNA.

PM: From performance to digital to textile, your art practice includes a comprehensive range of materials, forms and processes. What is your process for developing new multimedia pieces?
SW: I usually start with an idea, which changes as I make the physical work. I create drawings, mock-ups and digital renderings and then create physical prototypes. Both the mock ups and prototypes are edited as I go along. Many are discarded or stored as parts for future projects. I constantly move through multiple media and I work simultaneously in many.

PM: What is it about the history of craft as a practice that appeals to you and how do you see it as remaining prominent in a time when analogue methods are being outpaced by automation?
SW: I was taught by feminists at Brown University, and the work done at Judy Chicago and Miriam Schapiro’s Womanhouse was incredibly influential for me when I began making my own work. The students who created that project reimagined and reconstructed a home to integrate alternative logics into its structure. Their use of craft based practices to transform the domestic appealed to me as a kitchen table way of making art that could address larger social issues.
I also use many digitally methods to produce work. I have created augmented reality garments, digital video and animation, as well as vinyl wall papers printed from vectorised files. However, I try to maintain a relationship to the handmade by using original hand-printed artworks and collages as the raw material for the creation of the work.

PM: Can you discuss the notions of hybridity that feature in your work?
SW: I am deeply interested in play and the possibilities that emerge through processes and I try to bring together things that may not generally be fused together. When I started working on the Empathics project, I was inspired by the dual notion of a chimera. A chimera is both an imaginary female monster with disparate parts, and a scientific term for a genetic organism composed of two or more genetically distinct tissues—for example, partly male and partly female. This is one of my entry points into thinking about hybridity.

PM: What is your personal relationship with religion and spirituality, and how has it influenced your work?
SW: Many of the forms I use evoke the religious and spiritual. I do this to set a tone for my audience, so they have a sense that they are entering a state of liminality. My own life is relatively secular, although I was raised Catholic on my father’s side and Buddhist on my mother’s.

PM: It feels as if you are envisioning a model for a future that prioritises indigenous belief-systems, the female, digital innovation and harmony. This stands out as optimistic at a time when futuristic visions are so often grey, mechanic and dystopian. Is your commitment to a sense of joy, communion and hope a deliberate choice or natural occurrence for you when making work?
SW: The Empathics were conceptualised as a group of humans who became incredibly receptive to the introduction of foreign genetic material. I wanted to explore how morphology and culture are mutable through contact and creolisation. As I make work, I explore narratives that offer my audience a sense that there may be positive solutions for our often-dystopian visions of the future. I would say that yes, I make a deliberate choice to offer a sense of hope.

This interview is published in partnership with WeTransfer, as part of our series exploring the creatives who push the boundaries between digital and physical space in new and surprising ways. See Saya Woolfalk’s work custom moving image piece on WeTransfer here.
The six works from ‘Color Mixing Machine’ are now Online at Daata Editions, in association with POSTmatter, and are now available to buy online. Daata will be exhibiting a specially created artwork by Saya as part of the project at Expo Chicago, in conjunction with this POSTmatter and Daata Editions collaboration.

Saya is represented by Leslie Tonkonow Gallery NYC

Daata Editions & Zuecca Projects at the Venice Film Festival

In Alessandro Posseti, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Daniel Keller, David Gryn, excelsior, film festival, Jon Rafman, Takeshi Murata, Uncategorized, Venice, Zuecca Projects on 01/09/2016 at 2:37 pm

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Oh the humanity

Daata Editions & Zuecca Projects at the Venice Film Festival

Features

Daniel Keller & Martti Kalliala, Takeshi Murata, Jon Rafman
Jon Rafman, Oh the humanity (2015). Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions.
To coincide with the opening of the 73rd Venice International Film Festival, Daata Editions and Zuecca Project Space collaboratively present Oh the Humanity, an exhibition of video works by Daniel Keller & Martti Kalliala, Takeshi Murata, Jon Rafman, opening at the Hotel Excelsior on Wednesday 31 August 2016, 6 – 9pm.

The exhibition opens a dimensional window from the world of cinematography and the recreation of reality, to the a realm of digital and virtual media, where the suspension of disbelief is heightened and the connection to the “now” all the more vibrant. The project aims to re-contextualize video and digital artwork by breaking out from the white-cube and into the “real-world”. Daata Editions‘ mission of creating/commissioning “democratic” art pieces, is fulfilled by confronting the general public with the work that in turn is assimilated into the environment and becomes part of a new concept of exhibiting.

Hotel Excelsior
Lungomare Marconi 41
Venice Lido 30126, Italy

August 31 – September 10, 2016

More info:
zueccaprojects.com

The Daata Editions Sound Room at Chart Art Fair, Copenhagen 26-28 Aug

In Chart Art Fair, Copenhagen, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, John Skoog, Sofie Alsbo, Sound, Thora Dolven Balke, Uncategorized on 23/08/2016 at 8:49 pm

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Daata Editions presents

The Daata Editions Sound Room at CHART Art Fair, Copenhagen.

The Sound Room will host newly launched works by

Sofie Alsbo, Thora Dolven Balke, John Skoog.

CHART Art Fair
26 – 28 August

Kunsthal Charlottenburg
Copenhagen

Friday 26 August, 4 – 8pm
Saturday 27 August, 12 – 6pm
Sunday 28 August, 12 – 5pm

More info:
chartartfair.com

daata-editions.com