David Gryn blog

Posts Tagged ‘Daata’

Aalto and Daata present Animal Charms

In Aalto, Aalto University, Animal Charms, Art Video, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Finland, Helsinki, Jakob Kudsk Steensen, Ollie Dook, Puck Verkade, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 17/12/2018 at 9:11 pm

 

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Aalto Studios and Daata Editions are excited to announce their first collaborative exhibition taking place in January 2019.

ANIMAL CHARMS consists of newly commissioned artworks by Ollie Dook, Jakob Kudsk Steensen and Puck Verkade recently presented at NADA Miami during the Art Basel Miami Beach week of events.

Aalto Studios Gallery, Otakaari 7, 0210 Espoo, Finland

Exhibition: 17 January – 15 February 2019
Private View: 16 January 2019 5-7pm

More information coming soon!

https://daata-editions.com/

Image: Puck Verkade, LUCY LIVE, courtesy of the artist and Daata Editions

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The artwork is a digital file, yes by Pau Waelder – a new Foreword for Daata Editions

In Art Basel, Art Video, Collecting, Collector, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, NADA, Pau Waelder, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 16/11/2018 at 11:26 am

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The artwork is a digital file, yes

by Pau Waelder

A new Foreword for Daata Editions

When considering how to collect digital art, we come across two preconceptions: what an artwork must be and what digital files are worth. First, it is commonly assumed that an artwork is an object with unique attributes, original, and irreplaceable. The object routinely goes from the artist’s studio to the gallery, where it is acquired by a collector. There is no doubt that it is always the same object that trades hands, and it is finally the collector who decides where the artwork is placed and who has access to it. Conceptual and performance art has challenged this notion again and again, but the artwork always finds its way into the market and the collector’s home in the form of a more or less stable object. Thus, if an artwork (a) is not an object, (b) can be copied, (c) can be accessed or experienced beyond the control of its owner(s), and/or (c) requires a computer, software and display to be at all perceivable, some may find it “difficult,” “challenging,” or even not worth collecting. This relates to the second preconception.

Our computers, tablets and smartphones are constantly storing digital files. Most of them we have created ourselves, others we have downloaded for free or for a fee. They fill the device’s storage space and force us to either copy them to other devices, store them in the cloud or delete them. Digital files are therefore constantly moved around, copied and erased, both a necessity and a burden. In most cases, we don’t know what to do with them, they just linger in folders and hidden directories until detected by a cleanup app or simply obliterated when the device that stores them reaches the end of its service life. Digital files, therefore, tend to be considered expendable in the sense that there should always be another copy somewhere. In fact, a growing segment of the entertainment industry relies on selling access to content on digital files that we temporarily store in our devices and swiftly remove when we are done watching the film, tv series, or documentary; listening to the song or podcast; reading the book, graphic novel or magazine. Many times, the file is not even downloaded, it is streamed and thus disappears the moment it is not used anymore, without leaving a trace. When we pay for the content, we either rely on it being safely stored by the provider and always conveniently accessible or we just want to experience it and never care what happens to it afterwards, because there will always be more, newer content ready to be clicked on.

My point is that artworks and digital files seem to be incompatible, due to how we tend to conceive artworks and our daily experience with digital files. Artworks are forever, digital files are ephemeral. Artworks are unique objects, digital files are immaterial worthless copies. However, an artwork does not need to be an object. In fact, a painting is not an object, it is an image that becomes a physical object because the pigment needs to be placed on a surface and canvases make it easier than walls to create, move around and sell the images. An artwork created in a digital format (a video, sound, jpeg, gif, 3D animation, browser-based piece or what have you) is not only always a copy but also the result of a software interpreting a file on a certain display, so every time it is experienced it turns out to be, in a way, a unique performance. Of course, one has to make sure that the software works with the file and that the display shows the piece as intended, but that’s all part of the artwork being something other than a static, physical object –which would nevertheless require certain conditions of placement, lighting, humidity and so forth. Finally, the artwork may be available to others even if it is safely at home and a certificate of authenticity, kept in the safe, states that no one else owns it. Artworks have a life of their own as they are viewed in exhibitions, reproduced in photographs and videos, distributed in magazines, books and blogs. Most of the art we know and love, we have never owned and will never own – even big collectors know and love much more art than they have bought. A large part of that art we have seen through reproductions, mostly on screens. It is still part of us, and for those who were lucky, smart or powerful enough to buy it, the more people who feel that the artwork is part of them, the better. For what good is it to own something that no one else knows about, that none can appreciate, that cannot be shared?

Digital art allows us to own and at the same time share an artwork – not only its reproduction. This can raise some eyebrows and insecurities. It may be argued that if the artwork is available elsewhere or that it can be copied, it loses its value. However, in addition to what I have already stated about the nature of a digital file, let us consider what Nelson Goodman found to be the difference between an original artwork and a forgery: its history of production. A digital artwork that has been purchased from a reputable source with a valid registry of authenticity has a history of production that can be established from the artist to the collector. No matter how many copies of the artwork may circulate, only the collector – or collectors if the artwork is editioned– can claim ownership and, more importantly, become part of the history of the artwork. This is not just provenance, which will matter to the next owner, but an active involvement in the existence of the artwork, its relevance and also in supporting the work of the artist. This is where Daata Editions comes in. Daata commissions art that is sold through its online platform in limited editions. The artists are paid to produce artworks that anyone can buy with a few clicks. The buyer can download the artwork and store it in her computer, on the cloud, wherever, make copies and display them on any device she owns. The rest of us can see the same artwork – watermarked – on the platform, appreciate it, maybe feel the urge to own it too. But we won’t be part of the artwork’s history, only those who bought it do. And those who are lucky or smart enough get the first edition.

Pau Waelder is a curator, writer and researcher whose work focuses on contemporary art and new media.

https://daata-editions.com/

Notes for Bytes for Sale – Talk in Helsinki

In Bytes for Sale, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Digital, digital art, Helsinki, Kiasma, Uncategorized on 09/11/2018 at 5:24 pm
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Ollie Dook, Animal Stories, Daata Editions

 

Bytes for Sale

A talk by

David Gryn, Daata Editions

At Kiasma, Helsinki

Organised by AV-arkki http://www.av-arkki.fi/

Daata – what is it:

Daata is a commissioning platform ostensibly for artists who work with digital mediums, primarily video and sound. It exhibits and distributes online and shows the work world wide in collaboration with art fairs, galleries and museums. We have over 70 artists online and over 400 artworks.

Daata emerged from my many years focussing on showing artists moving image in the context of the cinema and leading art fairs worldwide – and realising that more needed to be done to support artists and to galvanise a somewhat reticent market place. It is designed as ‘a’ model, hopefully one of many and its aims are to be empowering (to artists, the medium, audiences etc).

https://daata-editions.com/

This talk can be summed up in two words:

PAY ARTISTS

But I was asked to speak for 40 minutes so here goes:

Is there a digital art market – in a nutshell ‘no’, but below – I will elaborate.

Community, Collaboration, Chemistries

It is a people business

I have seen many people come and go – since setting up Daata.

But the people who really care about empowerment, mutual support and collaboration survive.

Many people approach Daata to collaborate. They want to rub shoulders with the ‘cool’, with digital. They also often want Free content.

They have a unique business plan to raise millions and make billions from a dot com or major retail enterprise.

The collaborators often want us to promote their wares – but not much or nothing in return.

These are not community builders.

It is time for comprehensive unity.

This isn’t really a new thought. As I have been doing something like this for almost 20 years. Starting off with mostly analogue materials, and over time transmogrifying into digital process.

I have always dwelled on how to increase the audience/market position and the profile of digital media and this is definitely not new to me.

I have observed that the use and display of analogue or digital media at international art fairs has declined – where now you will see almost none. This is due to the fact that the the art market does not know what to do with digital media, how to sell or display digital media.

The irony is that most artists touch on digital media. Most galleries sell via digital platforms. Most museums and galleries and artists communicate via digital marketing and information.

They update their systems every so often and redesign and so on. But when you talk to Museums about collecting digital media – they are fearful, controlling, and nervous about how to protect, display, archive, sustain digital media over the next 100 years.

My simple logic is always – if I gave a Museum a Picasso or indeed a shredded Banksy – they will find a way to do all the above. Because they value it and believe in its extrinsic and intrinsic worth. 10 years ago I would not have been having the same regular conversations about VR/AR/Blockchain – but somehow the museum wants the understanding of longevity with digital mediums that absolutely no one else can know or control. 

There are those who are artists, gallerist, curators, collectors and they often purport to being really interested in collaborating – but when it gets down to it – they are mostly interested (either buy necessity or by design) in rubbing shoulders with the wealthy, the big art brands, the big sponsors, the famous artists, the big dinners etc

In working with Art Fairs over many years – I have seen a trait. They want to work with me/us to empower the medium, galleries and artists and always start off on a really great moral crusade/position. Then when it gets nearer to the actual fair – there is a lot of forgetting and not bothering that goes on. Reason: it isn’t the main feature, it doesn’t bring revenue, and audience may not connect. Art fairs missions are get galleries to pay and wealthy audiences in to buy and general public to buy tickets.

A market thrives on competition and mutual interdependence of the many. And we need to face a different joined-up approach to create audience interest and market power.

Artist relationships and support

It is a very human business and my role is to find best outcomes for the artist and those that support them too. This works best when we all collaborate best. The artists who are a delight to work with are those that you continue to work with and that works both ways. Bad reputations stick.

Control, dominance and power:

Those with hyper success and market dominance do well and survive – but that is the very extreme – the names we all know – not all artists, curators, gallerists are cut out to run multi national corporations.

Entities entering the digital space want this, the archaic market place wants this, it is a barrier to greater influence.

This is the way: so many entities want to be the market leader or power broker or in fact – there is only one solution and it is there’s. This occurs time and again with individuals saying they have the ultimate technology, the ultimate contract, the ultimate methods … it is strange that when it get to technology so many people want to have the dominant solution that we should all use.

Bizarrely the entities that say they have the ultimate contract (as an example) don’t share their contract templates, same with technologies that we should all use. In tech circles open-source is common – in art circles the sharing gene diminishes radically.

The niche collector. Sometime the video art collector is a quirk – it delineates an art form, but gives them niche power as the ‘video art collector’. Just Be an art collector, with something like a leading interest in tech mediums.

The issue with internet and digital media – is that it has its own history of market dominance, hyper valuations, ambitions to become one of the multi billion dollar elite businesses (google, facebook, amazon etc etc). However the art world does not work according to norms of business. I have watched some companies shoot for the stars and go out of business – whilst others can survive – based on their aspirations being artworld realistic.

Dedication, longevity, passion and commitment:

I believe my 30+ year duration in working in an area of limited financial reward is based on my integrity to deliver the best projects for limited resources. I have reaped recognition from years of experience and focus. This is based on my unswerving passion and commitment to make a difference in much the same way an artists has to make artworks regardless of the final sale/exhibition. My reputation is always my last project.

technology, delivery, simplicity

Making projects happen is what I have been doing. However, the value in complex set ups is hard to achieve a return. So my work uses ready made/existing materials/equipment/online/Internet/cinema and deliver usually in single screen/single file formats.

Promotion, marketing of projects:

Fence sitting doesn’t work. If you agree to work with an artist, or be in a fair, or organise anything. Give it your all. There is no value to engaging with what you are doing. There is no one else will promote your project or work as well as you. Or usually no one else promotes that which they opt to collaborate with. Which is very strange.

Solutions:

-More competition.

-Clusters of digital entities teaming up along lines of art fair models.

-marketing investment

-create ideal situations (whatever that means

-Pay artists. It provides trusted integrity to the people we purport to support.

-true collaborations

-create ‘a’ model not ‘the’ model. Semantics are key.

-Find your confidence

-Help nurture confidence

-Social-ist

-Not Capital-ist

-Don’t aim to dominate – but to collaborate

-Contracts are only any value if all parties benefit from the agreement.

We revert back to the human experience. Thru this we aim to build support systems for artists, ways to enhance the audience experience and look for best outcomes for all and conversely we strive to avoid avarice and corruption, which is an inevitable consequence of aims at huge profit and market dominance.

My model is to pay artists and/or look out for best outcomes for them. To keep a company light and limit its overheads.

My discussions with all future partners is – team up by paying artists and you have a deal.

The big collectors, collections understand the eco system and treat artists and galleries with reverence

How does he see the international art world developing and the role of galleries for digital media art in the future?

Fantasy world idea:

Museums and galleries shall usurp the art fairs and auction houses in terms of perceived dominance. The market can be led by the integrity of those who’s mission is to best serve art. To have the dominance the other way around – means that art is driven by its market powers and not its true intrinsic value of the quality of the aesthetics. To think that a Banksy artwork is of great value because of how it is sold at an auction – is indicative of the current demise we are in – but this also means that we can learn from this an react positively by shifting the focus from auction house shenanigans to museum/gallery.

I have worked with art fairs and auction houses – because they have become the dominant focus and attention for art events and exhibition – the one stop shops for audience to see much at the same time. Easy, sometimes lazy, economic rationale, it hitherto works (for some – usually the big players).

The art fair does not mean that art shown is the best – it means it is the work that is most likely to sell.

This logic – means that digital art mediums have incrementally reduced their visibility at art fairs over the years – till now there is almost none. Art fair costs are higher and the cost/income ratio has reduced – therefore the risk factor of tricky art mediums to sell are too high.

Galleries have to reclaim control of the art market from the auction house and art fair or those entities have to give back the power – by admitting that they (the galleries) have the most interest in supporting the role of the artist. The gallery business model is from selecting, exhibiting, selling and distributing the best artists. The art fair interest is to invite Galleries and audiences who pay money to be there. The auction house has no integral interest in supporting the gallery system as it predominantly benefits from the secondary market.

We need the experts of art/artist organisers, bright curators, facilitators – who’s interest is chiefly the support and promotion of artists.

The future:

Galleries and museums (and art fairs and such like): to treat digital mediums in equal terms to all other mediums.

The value of the ephemeral:

The future will be the age of the ephemeral/near-invisible art object – the digital file. The music, gamer and film industries understand the value of the download, the online link/file. Their value is in the potential volume of audience. Hitherto the artworld has never had this potential audience, as the contemporary audience is niche, and its strength has often been based on the rarity of the object and the value is centred on a very small wealthy elite audience. But our work is to either achieve the audience of those other art forms or utilise elements of it and evolve solutions to earn revenue and reward artists.

I personally don’t believe in (excessive) ownership and have always deeply valued music, dance and performances. I can pay 99c for a track of music that I value equally to any multi million dollar artwork.

I end as I began. There is only one way to work and engage with artists and that is:

PAY ARTISTS

I have to add a proviso – that this is not always possible due to restricted budgets – but if it is an aim – then it comes across and is fairly obvious to the arts community. If you can’t pay – find the best way to enable and empower artists to benefit from you working with them.

https://daata-editions.com/

 

Tin Ojeda – New Age Let Down – a Daata Editions New Release

In 303, Art Rio, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Max Reinhardt, New Age Let Down, Rebel Souls, Surf, Surfing, Tin Ojeda, Uncategorized on 17/09/2018 at 5:16 pm

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Tin Ojeda

New Age Let Down

Daata Editions

http://daata-editions.com

Coming Soon … released online on 26 Sept via Daata Editions and screening at Art Rio 26-30 Sept.

New York-based artist/experimental filmmaker Tin Ojeda’s new series for Daata Editions ‘New Age Let Down’ is a montage of images in both colour and monochrome displayed against an eclectic soundtrack of improvisational jazz, rock and dissonant noise. Inspired by his ongoing fascination with a vintage 1970s film-making, Ojeda captures the scenery in a grainy texture characteristic to his films which lends them an almost nostalgic feel, while reflecting his interest in the world’s social and political situations. The jazz / punk in the background enhances the almost physical effect the films have on the viewer.

Tin Ojeda was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1982. He studied at the University Of Bellas Artes in Argentina before moving to the United States in 2000. Ojeda’s films such as ‘Daughter’ ‘Kook Paradise’ and ‘Expencive Porno Movie’ resonated with the surfer community, and in 2017 ‘Free Jazz Vein’ brought Ojeda to the mainstream attention when it was screened at Art Basel Miami. The film also earned him the Argentinian a SURFER Award nomination for Movie of the Year. Ojeda is also the founder of a clothing brand D/M Art – Drug Money Art.

Release of these works will take place in conjunction with Daata Editions at Art Rio and in Rebel Souls, curated by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions.

https://daata-editions.com/art/video/17-new-age-let-down

Happy Happy New Year 2018

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Elliot Dodd, Internet, Jillian Mayer, Lu Yang, Post-Internet, Table.Video, Uncategorized, Video, VR on 31/12/2017 at 5:22 pm
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The Doctor by Elliot Dodd, 2018

 

Wishing you the Happiest and most Successful New Year 2018

Image: The Doctor by Elliot Dodd, a new Daata Editions commission available for viewing and acquiring in a few weeks.

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LuYang Interactive Hearse by Lu Yang 2017

Daata Editions Review of 2017

2017 was a fantastic year for us at Daata with so many amazing projects, artists commissions, exhibitions, art fair, gallery and museum collaborations.

Daata was curator of Film Cologne at Art Cologne, EXPO Sound at EXPO CHICAGO and exhibited at NADA New York, Sunday Art Fair London, PHOTOFAIRS Shanghai, Art Los Angeles Contemporary, Untitled Radio, Strangelove Film Festival. David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions curated his 7th Edition of Film & Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach.

Artists released by Daata in 2018 included: Jacky Connolly, Sue de Beer, Lu Yang, Jeremy Couillard, FlucT, Toby Ziegler, along with A-V curated by Amanda Schmitt featuring sound works by Maria Antelman, Alexandra Drewchin, FlucT, Marina Rosenfeld. NAUSEA VR curated and produced by Philip Hausmeier of Metaphysics VR, with artists Eddie Peake, Florian Meisenberg, Anne de Vries, Ruben Grilo, Jack Strange and Anna K.E. Zata Banks FRSA in Daata’s poetry section curated artists: Laura Focarazzo, Kate Jessop, C.O. Moed, Julian Scordato, Susanne Wiegner, Antoinette Zwirchmayr.

Daata has presented screenings, talks and events in collaboration with citizenM Hotels, Label Dalbin, Artspace, Artsy, Artload, A—Z, Kristiansand Kunsthall Norway, ARS 17 at KIASMA Museum Helsinki, M Woods Museum Beijing, MOUart Gallery Beijing, Zuecca Projects Venice, Vanity Projects NYC and Miami, Ludlow and Soho House New York & Chicago, ACE Hotels LA & Chicago, Freud Museum London, ZAP Shop and the Zabludowicz Collection.

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Day Off 3 by Jillian Mayer

Upcoming in 2018

2018 will be Daata’s busiest year ever, with fantastic collaborations scheduled on artists technology, video & sound projects with Independent New York, NADA New York, If So, What ? (the new tech meets art & design fair in Silicon Valley, San Jose), Art Rio, EXPO CHICAGO, PHOTOFAIRS Shanghai, Untitled Radio, Dalbin and their new table.video, Rhizome, citizenM Hotels, Vanity Projects NY & Miami, DKUK in Peckham, Art Night London, ICP NY and many many more.

Alongside many projects with leading global brands and exciting developments with VR and AR technologies. Daata is releasing many new artists in 2018, starting with Elliot Dodd, new Playlists, Curated projects and much much more ….

Image: Day Off 3 by Jillian Mayer / https://daata-editions.com/art/video/day-off-3

 

 

 

 

Blink Burn – The Pratt and New World Symphony Collaboration – Miami Beach – Dec 7

In Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Basel Miami Beach, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Miami, Miami Beach, New World Center, New World Symphony, Pratt, Uncategorized on 27/11/2017 at 10:57 pm

 

ABMA

Pratt x New World Symphony present
BLINK, BURN.

A unique performance during Art Basel in Miami Beach 2017
Followed by a cocktail reception co-hosted by Pratt Alumni Miami Network

Thursday, December 7
6pm Performance
7pm Reception

SunTrust Pavilion, New World Center, 500 17th Street, Miami Beach

Free and open to the public; reservations and more information at

http://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/concerts/blink-burn/

FACEBOOK EVENT

Please join us for BLINK, BURN, a new addition to the landscape of Art Basel in Miami Beach. This collaboration between Pratt Institute and New World Symphony (NWS) explores the creative possibilities that emerge when film/video artists engage deeply with sound artists/musicians. This yearlong collaboration, conceived by David Gryn, curator of Film & Sound for Art Basel in Miami Beach and Director of Daata Editions, will culminate in a high-profile visual/aural event on December 7 during Art Basel in Miami Beach. It will feature original video work by select Pratt students accompanied by NWS fellows’ live sound performance.

PROGRAM

BLINK, BURN, led by Lisa Crafts at Pratt and Michael Linville at NWS and London based artist Molly Palmer, encompasses four different video and musical pieces that explore the general theme of human impact and the multifaceted, complicated nature of humanity.

Lifeblood

Composed by Christopher Hernacki (Bass Trombone Fellow) and Zach Manzi(Clarinet Fellow)
Performed by Nick Castellano (Horn Fellow), Christopher Hernacki and Zach Manzi
Moving Images by Alexander Mejia with creative partner Sieanna Janae Williams

Lifeblood is an exploration of urban existentialism through the depiction of the interior and exterior spaces we inhabit; a suggestion of the relationship between our biology and the structures around us. This piece features sequences of textured video layers, cutouts and deep instrumentation to weave the genetic fabric of our collective experience.

Zodiac Suite

Performed by Andrew Chilcote (Bass Fellow)
Moving Images by Lou Goncalves

Zodiac is a textured moving image work that interacts with a live performance to create a dialogue between the sound and the image. It combines hand–processed 16mm film and handmade colored pencil drawings with digital software. The style, color and timing of the images were inspired by the musical momentum, intensity and notations of Lucas Drew’s Zodiac Suite as performed by Andrew Chilcote.

Ex Materia

Mary Reed (Bass Fellow): performing her original composition: Cosmicomics
Moving Images: Natalie Carvallo, Emma Dold, Holly Durgan, Lauren Kolar

The cyclical nature of creation and destruction is explored in this scrolling exquisite corpse. Ex Materia combines stop-motion, hand drawn animation, collage and live action video to create an otherworldly universe inspired the hypnotic composition Cosmicomics by Mary Reed.

Utopia

Utopia, composed by Ludek Wojtkowski (Violin Fellow)
Moving Image by Christopher Rutledge with creative partner Lauren Pedrosa

What will happen after sea levels rise? What life will emerge from a post-human climate? Through animation, drone footage shot over Miami and a combination of live and pre-composed audio, Utopia addresses these questions.

https://www.pratt.edu/the-institute/public-programs/

Conception idea:

The idea to bring both entities together has emerged after my many years of working with Art Basel in Miami Beach as both Film and Sound Curator, and hosting the screening program taking place in Soundscape Park at the New World Symphony. It is aimed at the empowerment of students and future artists at the time of the annual city’s focus of the art fair and bring student bodies together to explore true collaboration, which for any filmmaking and most creative disciplines is so valuable and vital. (David Gryn)

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FlucT: The psychological thriller of Evidence, now on Daata Editions

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, FlucT, Performance, Uncategorized, Video on 22/10/2017 at 12:40 pm

FlucT – The psychological thriller of Evidence 

Now available to buy on Daata Editions

The subjects of these short texts feature FlucT. The table of contents is in itself hermetic. In 6 episodes, Monica & Sigrid traverse the psychological thrill within the manipulative isolation of a game. They flaunt evidence in the effective nature of capital as it sings the absurdity of our behavior and our performitivity. They include birdcages and bitches; the underlying systems that control us, warrior tactics toward empathy and the pregnancy of their relationship. The psychological thriller of Evidence can be considered a guidebook to the incessant questioning of reality that FlucT sees as the task of performance.

Monica Mirabile and Sigrid Lauren have been performing as FlucT since 2011, presenting a hybrid collaboration of radical choreography, confrontational performance art, collaborative practice and pure magic. Before entering into a performance, each individual places a spell of protection over each other, allowing themselves to push their physicality to the max while remaining mindful of their partner’s saftey. Their dance practice has been described as “violently intimate” and their performances often confront and challenge not only the space between their bodies, but between the performers and audience. Most works involve audio tracks designed by the artists, leading to a further intimacy and connection between the performance, performers, and audience. This work, “Main Tool as a Dummy,” reflects the rhythm and nonlinear narration of their performance work.

FlucT by Whitney Mallet in Cura magazine

 

Daata x citizenM breakfast talk with Jon Sharples – Oct 30

In Art, Artist, citizenM, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Jon Sharples, Tower of London, Uncategorized on 15/10/2017 at 9:43 pm

citizenM talk images

Join us on Monday October 30th at 8.30am at citizenM Tower of London for a breakfast discussion with intellectual property lawyer and Chair of the Simmons & Simmons Art Network Jon Sharples. Jon will talk about corporate collecting and his interest in art, the law and digital mediums, joined by Art Basel in Miami Beach Film & Sound curator David Gryn and Director of Daata Editions. Including an audience Q&A.

Book to join us at Eventbrite

Daata Editions at Sunday Art Fair

In Daata Editions, David Gryn, FlucT, Frieze, Jacky Connolly, Jeremy Couillard, Lu Yang, Sue de Beer, Sunday, Toby Ziegler, Uncategorized on 22/09/2017 at 9:54 pm

Sunday Fair

DAATA EDITIONS – a new mixtape

Launching the new FlucT, The psychological thriller of Evidence artworks for Sale online.

Presenting a new compilation mixtape featuring recent artist commissions and artwork releases on Daata Editions: FlucT, Jacky Connolly, Jeremy Couillard (curated by yours, mine & ours), Sue de Beer, Lu Yang, Toby Ziegler and artists sound works in A-V curated by Amanda Schmitt featuring artists: Maria Antelman, Alexandra Drewchin, FlucT and Marina Rosenfeld. 

See the Full Press Release – Daata Editions PR

SUNDAY
5—8 October 2017
Ambika P3, 35 Marylebone Rd, London, NW1 5LS
http://www.sundayartfair.com/ 

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EXPO Sound at EXPO CHICAGO curated by Daata Editions

In Chicago, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Expo Chicago, Navy Pier, Sound, Uncategorized on 11/08/2017 at 11:45 am
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Image: Larry Achiampong, The Ascent (100 Degrees), 2016

EXPO CHICAGO partners with Daata Editions and Navy Pier to present the inaugural EXPO Sound program (September 13–17, 2017). Curated by Daata Editions, an online platform for the sale of commissioned artist video, sound and web art editions, launching new artworks by selected international artists—the program featuring artists: Larry Achiampong, Tracey Emin, Leo Gabin, Rashaad Newsome and Hannah Perry, will be complemented by works from artists represented by EXPO CHICAGO 2017 Exhibitors.

“Artist sound—like artist video, performance and digital work—is being increasingly exhibited due to the dynamic and experiential nature of the medium, paired with its all-encompassing and ephemeral presence,” said Daata Editions Director David Gryn. “The artist as performer, musician and entertainer is ever sought after in our global calendar of art events, but somewhere in all of this is the truth and essence of art making, with the outcome of very real, tangible and brilliant works of art.”

Sound is truly art for everyone. You can try and contain it – but when it is released it purvades our every pore. 

Last year in walking around the Navy Pier – I realised that I couldn’t escape from the piped pop music of Britney Spears through the public speaker system, which for the area of a food mall makes sense, but for the path leading to an art fair – not so much sense. So I mention this, in my incredulity, to Fair director Tony Karman and he simply responds “why don’t you curate Sound for 2017 ?”

So this year EXPO Sound is born, playing artist sound works primarily from Daata Editions commissioned artists as well as selected works from Expo Chicago gallery submissions. 

The program will be installed throughout the public speaker system at Navy Pier—along the South Dock, within the exposition entrance, and on the /Dialogues Stage.

2017 EXPO Sound Artists:
Larry Achiampong | Daata Editions
Tracey Emin | Daata Editions
Leo Gabin | Daata Editions
Jared Madere | David Lewis Gallery, New York
Rashaad Newsome | Daata Editions
Hannah Perry | Daata Editions
Cheryl Pope | moniquemeloche, Chicago
Xaviera Simmons | David Castillo Gallery, Miami
Nick van Woert | GRIMM, Amsterdam

GUIDED TOUR OF EXPO SOUND: DAVID GRYN. Friday September 17 at 3:00pm. Join curator David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions (www.daata-editions.com) for an exclusive guided tour of the inaugural program of EXPO Sound. Launching new artworks by select international artists, the program will be complemented by artists represented by EXPO CHICAGO 2017 Exhibitors, installed throughout the public speaker system at Navy Pier.

Daata Editions features Artist Sound at Soho House Chicago with Scott Reeder, David Gryn and Amanda Schmitt in conversation (Sept 12) and launching a new sound project on Daata, A-V curated by Amanda Schmitt featuring new sound works by Maria Antelman, Alexandra Drewchin, FlucT, Marina Rosenfeld.

For more information, visit: https://www.expochicago.com/ & https://daata-editions.com/

See ArtNews