David Gryn blog

Archive for the ‘digital art’ Category

David Gryn Interview on Artload

In Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Basel Miami Beach, Artload, Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Digital, digital art, Uncategorized on 16/11/2017 at 3:52 pm

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The Artload interview, David Gryn

David is Founder/Director of Daata Editions and Artprojx and is Curator of Film & Sound, Art Basel in Miami Beach.

Interviewed by Artload’s Vivian Gandelsman

See full interview here: http://artload.com/video/david-gryn

Youtube

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Daata x Vanity present Saya Woolfalk

In Art, Art Fair, Artist, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Digital, digital art, Frieze, Frieze Art Fair, Leslie Tonkonow, Miami, New York, Rita Pinto, Saya Woolfalk, Uncategorized, Vanity Projects, Video on 30/04/2017 at 7:25 am

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Daata Editions x Vanity Projects – featuring Saya Woolfalk

Colour Mixing Machine

On view in both Vanity NYC and Miami venues April 15 – May 9

Vanity Projects, 99 Chrystie St 2F, New York, NY, 10002 +16464102928

www.vanityprojectsnyc.com/ & https://daata-editions.com/

Saya Woolfalk is a New York based artist who uses science fiction and fantasy to re-imagine the world in multiple dimensions. With the multi-year projects No Place, The Empathics and ChimaTEK, Woolfalk has created the world of the Empathics, a fictional race of women who are able to alter their genetic make-up and fuse with plants. With each body of work, Woolfalk continues to build the narrative of these women’s lives, and questions the utopian possibilities of cultural hybridity. The Pollen Catchers is a continuation of ChimaTEK, in which the Empathics employ color-mixing machines to further shape shift their morphology. Sound attribution to The Hathaway Family Plot. https://daata-editions.com/artists/saya-woolfalk

“2017 promises to be an exciting year for Vanity Projects, which is partnering with Daata Editions, the British-based online art platform equally dedicated to outside-the-box experimentation. This initiative will bring a wealth of talent to both the Miami and New York venues, starting with Scott Reeder, followed by Saya Woolfalk, Ed Fornieles, Yung Jake, Jacky Connolly, Jillian Mayer, Jeremy Couillard, Rashaad Newsome and others. “A Goth Life,” a group show opening in June, cheekily brings together video that honors “our joyously soulless, self-reflective, insular, tension and angst ridden times,” just in time for the sunny summer. Key activations with art institutions will expand the project’s reach, with plans for potential events during Art Basel Miami Beach.” Text by Scott Indrisek

Vanity Projects in collaboration with Daata Editions welcomes Frieze, Vanity and Daata guests, Friday May 5, 10am-12pm for a screening of Saya Woolfalk’s work Color Mixing Machine 1-6, and complimentary nail polish manicures inspired by the artist & join Rita Pinto, David Gryn and Saya Woolfalk for drinks from 6-8pm. RSVP: contact@vanityprojectsnyc.com

Saya Woolfalk: ChimaCloud and the Pose System at Leslie Tonkonow. New works by the artist are on view through May 6th in Saya Woolfalk: ChimaCloud and the Pose System at Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, 535 West 22nd Street, New York, NY. www.tonkonow.com

Saya Woolfalk – All the colours of a rainbow

In Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Fair, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, digital art, Expo Chicago, POSTmatter, Saya Woolfalk, Uncategorized, Video Art, wetransfer on 15/09/2016 at 8:40 am

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ALL THE COLOURS OF THE RAINBOW

by POSTmatter Editors | September 7, 2016

A CONVERSATION WITH SAYA WOOLFALK ON CULTURAL MIXES, UTOPIA AND HER NEW COLLABORATION WITH DAATA EDITIONS AND POSTMATTER. “I AM DEEPLY INTERESTED IN PLAY AND THE POSSIBILITIES THAT EMERGE THROUGH PROCESSES AND I TRY TO BRING TOGETHER THINGS THAT MAY NOT GENERALLY BE FUSED TOGETHER”

Saya Woolfalk is a New York-based, Japanese-born interdisciplinary artist. Using science fiction, fantasy, anthropology and semiotics, she explores the alternative utopian possibilities of identity. Melding dance, video, animation and sculpture in a number of ongoing projects, she offers fantastical narratives of cultural hybridity to expand traditional visions of the present and ideas of the future.
In a recent public performance piece that took over New York’s Fulton Centre, she paired performance with interactive app technology to offer passers by a glimpse into her kaleidoscopic imagination. It is one in a series of pieces that builds the story of the Empathics, a fictional race of women who Woolfalk is writing as unbound by the limits of genetics.
In collaboration with Daata Editions, we preview one artwork from Woolfalk’s upcoming 2016 series Color Mixing Machine. In it, she continues to build the story of the Empathics through ritualistic digital creations that reimagine what it means to be human. The full set of artworks will run in POSTmatter from 29th September, and are available to buy on Daata Editions, an innovative digital platform representing contemporary moving image and sound artists. Our preview and interview with Woolfalk is presented in association with WeTransfer.

PM: What is the mission of your fictional future female species, the Emphatics, and the space they inhabit, ‘No Place’?
SW: ‘No Place’ is a project I worked on from 2006 to 2008 with filmmaker and anthropologist Rachel Lears. The No Placeans are plant humans from the future who change gender and colour, transform into the landscape when they die, and repurpose refuse into usable technologies. The Empathics are people in the present who establish something called the Institute of Empathy (IoE) to study No Place. The IoE encounters a grouping of No Placean bones and fungus on the bones stimulates their physiological mutation and cultural transformation. This mutation allows the Empathics to easily cross species by integrating foreign genetic material into their DNA.

PM: From performance to digital to textile, your art practice includes a comprehensive range of materials, forms and processes. What is your process for developing new multimedia pieces?
SW: I usually start with an idea, which changes as I make the physical work. I create drawings, mock-ups and digital renderings and then create physical prototypes. Both the mock ups and prototypes are edited as I go along. Many are discarded or stored as parts for future projects. I constantly move through multiple media and I work simultaneously in many.

PM: What is it about the history of craft as a practice that appeals to you and how do you see it as remaining prominent in a time when analogue methods are being outpaced by automation?
SW: I was taught by feminists at Brown University, and the work done at Judy Chicago and Miriam Schapiro’s Womanhouse was incredibly influential for me when I began making my own work. The students who created that project reimagined and reconstructed a home to integrate alternative logics into its structure. Their use of craft based practices to transform the domestic appealed to me as a kitchen table way of making art that could address larger social issues.
I also use many digitally methods to produce work. I have created augmented reality garments, digital video and animation, as well as vinyl wall papers printed from vectorised files. However, I try to maintain a relationship to the handmade by using original hand-printed artworks and collages as the raw material for the creation of the work.

PM: Can you discuss the notions of hybridity that feature in your work?
SW: I am deeply interested in play and the possibilities that emerge through processes and I try to bring together things that may not generally be fused together. When I started working on the Empathics project, I was inspired by the dual notion of a chimera. A chimera is both an imaginary female monster with disparate parts, and a scientific term for a genetic organism composed of two or more genetically distinct tissues—for example, partly male and partly female. This is one of my entry points into thinking about hybridity.

PM: What is your personal relationship with religion and spirituality, and how has it influenced your work?
SW: Many of the forms I use evoke the religious and spiritual. I do this to set a tone for my audience, so they have a sense that they are entering a state of liminality. My own life is relatively secular, although I was raised Catholic on my father’s side and Buddhist on my mother’s.

PM: It feels as if you are envisioning a model for a future that prioritises indigenous belief-systems, the female, digital innovation and harmony. This stands out as optimistic at a time when futuristic visions are so often grey, mechanic and dystopian. Is your commitment to a sense of joy, communion and hope a deliberate choice or natural occurrence for you when making work?
SW: The Empathics were conceptualised as a group of humans who became incredibly receptive to the introduction of foreign genetic material. I wanted to explore how morphology and culture are mutable through contact and creolisation. As I make work, I explore narratives that offer my audience a sense that there may be positive solutions for our often-dystopian visions of the future. I would say that yes, I make a deliberate choice to offer a sense of hope.

This interview is published in partnership with WeTransfer, as part of our series exploring the creatives who push the boundaries between digital and physical space in new and surprising ways. See Saya Woolfalk’s work custom moving image piece on WeTransfer here.
The six works from ‘Color Mixing Machine’ are now Online at Daata Editions, in association with POSTmatter, and are now available to buy online. Daata will be exhibiting a specially created artwork by Saya as part of the project at Expo Chicago, in conjunction with this POSTmatter and Daata Editions collaboration.

Saya is represented by Leslie Tonkonow Gallery NYC

Is Online Art The Future ? Aston Martin feature on Daata Editions

In Amalia Ulman, Art, Art Basel, Aston Martin, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, David Hockney, digital art, Elizabeth Dee, Julia Stoschek, Saya Woolfalk, Scott Reeder, Uncategorized, Zuecca Projects on 08/07/2016 at 10:53 am
Aston Martin Daata Editions

Image: Tracey Emin, I Lay Here, 2016 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions

 

Art transcends culture, echoes its roots and is integral
to the documentation of the human experience

For an artwork to reflect the musings of its creators, it should ideally be able to naturally adapt. While a ‘physical’ piece of art may be moved or displaced, its very form cannot. The intellectually satisfying aspect of enjoying a painting for example, will come from discovering (or rediscovering) a detail we have missed or overlooked. A brush stroke or a shaft of sunlight can add new meaning to a well-loved piece, without altering it per sae. Since the dawn of the Internet in the 1980s, artists have exploited the laws of this parallel world to create events, images, or to subvert the way we visually absorb information.
Part of the attraction is its global reach, the use of cutting-edge technology and the liberation of art from the constraints of traditional wealth-creating establishments such as commercial galleries, auction houses, private collectors and public museums. Then there’s how we as viewers actually relate to virtual or digital art and one of the most exciting features of a digital piece of art is that it is ever changing. While we may be familiar with its initial subject, it will surprise us as it moves and transforms, inviting us to engage.

Though digital pieces have found a home in some of the art world’s most heavyweight institutions, many collectors still need convincing.

Enter Daata Editions: an online gallery utterly dedicated to video, sound and web art, launched in May 2015, showcasing artists’ video, sound, web and poetry works, available to view and acquire on the website as digital downloads in limited editions. Featured on Daata Editions is Argentinian-born Spanish Artist Amalia Ulman whose series, ‘White Flag Emojis’, displays short videos that create a powerful feeling of apprehension. Ulman is also known for exploring social media in her work, Excellences and Perfections, a poignant four-month long art project in which she creates a fake persona on her Instagram page with thousands of followers. The thought-provoking series throws up important questions on the pitfalls of easily manufactured online “fame”, while, perhaps ironically, highlighting the power of digital art in doing so.

The founder of Daata Editions, David Gryn, and his team have a strong reputation worldwide for producing, curating and promoting artists’ audio visual projects and events that have consistently excited and attracted large audiences, and introduced new audiences to the arts. Gryn says that digital and downloadable art is the future, a belief confirmed by David Hockney who in 2011 began creating works to be viewed exclusively on an Ipad, thus allowing him broader perspective and freedom of adaptability when working.

Daata Editions artworks form part of the Hammer Museum Contemporary Collection, US; the Julia Stoschek Collection, Germany; KIASMA, Finland and the Zabludowicz Collection, UK. Collectors, including Robert and Renee Drake, The Netherlands, as well as galleries, including Elizabeth Dee, New York and Marc Foxx, Los Angeles, have purchased multiple artworks from the platform.

Things are moving all the time, so watch out for fresh new works Daata Editions will be launching in the next months. Artists will include the likes of Saya Woolfalk, Larry Achiampong, Scott Reeder and Tameka Norris. In addition, Daata Editions in collaboration with Zuecca Projects presents Gentrification, an exhibition with new works by artists Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, at BBAR, Bauer Hotel, Venice, to coincide with the 15th Venice Architecture Biennale.

A Case for Digital Art by Molly Elizalde – SWEET

In Daata, Daata Editions, Digital, digital art, Jon Rafman, Michael Manning, Molly Elizalde, SWEET, Tracey Emin, Uncategorized on 27/05/2016 at 9:06 am

 

A Case for Digital Art
New media artists are creating some of the most innovative and exciting art today. But how do you find a platform for work that only exists on a screen? The art marketplace, Daata Editions, has the answer and they want to share it with you.

By Molly Elizalde

www.s-w-e-e-t.com

May 25, 2016

The concept of digital art is a much-debated topic. For collectors, the idea of buying a work that’s not a physical object can be hard to grasp, and that makes it difficult for galleries to show the art in question. But the fact of the matter is that digital art is some of the most weirdly wonderful, smart work being made by young artists today. They just need a platform for it.
That’s where Daata Editions comes in. The pioneering online marketplace commissions 18 video, sound, and internet artists to create six new works each season. Launched last year, and now in its second series, which was released last week, Daata has worked with established artists such as Tracey Emin and up-and-comers like Chloe Wise and Amalia Ulman. Paradoxical filmmaker Jon Rafman is even giving away his Daata commission for free!

The most important part is that Daata is giving these artists the ability to create works that might not otherwise be made. And for that, we should all be grateful!
See daata-editions.com for more information on how to buy something!

Fill article (as featured on Snapchat and online)

http://www.s-w-e-e-t.com/culture/art-design/news/a475/a-case-for-digital-art/

It’s Nice That – A Chat with Daata Editions

In Art Basel, artists, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, digital art, Its Nice That, Jacolby Satterwhite, Jonathan Monaghan, Katie Torn, Michael Manning, Quayola, Sara Ludy, Uncategorized on 20/04/2016 at 10:18 pm
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Katie Torn

The problems with digital art and why moving image is so important: a chat with Daata Editions

The problem with the relative newness of media like video, digital and internet art is that unlike a canvas or a sculpture, people can struggle with the ideas of how to show, sell and “own” them. In a culture where film, gifs and other forms of creative work are available online, everywhere, to many people the idea of what is and isn’t art, and how you own it, is confusing. While everyone accepts that video art and digital art are still valid and important media; there are few organisations making the leap into viewing them in the commercial art world in the same way we would more traditional formats.

Digital art platform Daata Editions is changing all that, having launched last year as a space to champion a curated selection of commissioned pieces by artists working in digital, sound, moving image and internet art. Its first season featured 18 artists, and each created six new works available to buy on the website in editions of 15. Among the artists featured in season one are Jon Rafman, David Blandy and Rachel Maclean. Daata Editions has just announced its second season, with work by Tracey Emin, Jake Chapman and Casey Jane Ellison. The works will be priced from $100 upwards (around £70), and can be bought from 5 May. To coincide with the launch, we spoke to Daata Editions’ director David Gryn about how the platform works, why we need it, and changing attitudes towards digital and moving image art.

Why did you decide to start Daata Editions?

I’ve been working with artist moving image for nearly 20 years, so I have an instinct of how the art world and audiences engage with it, and how the market works with it. I previously curated video for Art Basel Miami, working with the art fair about how galleries can work with moving image. People often don’t bring it to art fairs as it doesn’t sell well, so I tried to bring it to life. We wanted to encourage galleries into programming exceptional moving image artists as they’re part of the fabric of the contemporary art world; but it was never made a priority. I wanted to encourage other models and platforms for showing artist moving image.

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Tameka Norris: did you like that

What are the problems with showing people art that lives online, in a world where we’re so surrounded by online images and audio, all the time?

We need to define art processes and work with artists who make art, not “content”. The web-based media want to serve a huge audience but it’s important to define that everything I do is about art and artists, not about wacky social media tropes. We’re empowering the artists, the audience and the collector to do what they do with this medium, and making sure it’s the artist we’re talking about rather than the great technical media we’re working with.

As technology evolves so rapidly, what are your feelings about the longevity of the work and the platform?

I don’t want to start guessing what the next 20 years will be like, but the better artists work with the greatest quality materials. Daata Editions is about looking at how to serve artists best and how to pay them, promote the work and make the business sustain itself. I wanted to create a model, not the model, and work with people trying to do the best of what they do.

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Tracey Emin: I Can’t Love Anymore

How do you select the artists you work with?

I just filter things by instinct, we work with a few other people including writers and curators, but we hear about a lot of artists through other artists. The site has the rudiments of being a gallery but the boundaries of a website rather than a gallery wall, so the art has to work with that.

We choose things you think can engage an audience, but also someone with currency in the art world. We’re taking a risk with some artists, but some have that currency already. We’re trying to keep it as open as possible, and the relationships that work well have a very collaborative nature. It’s a pleasure to make the process happen and try to read the crystal ball of who’s going to be successful. We’re not trying to be purveyors of the future but we’re saying “this is a system we’re believing in and it’s working well.” It’s a medium we want to engage with more and more.

What are the practicalities of the site, in terms of payment, rights and ownership of the work?

We’ve tried to price everything flat, not according to the current market. The pieces are downloaded onto a screen of a platform of your choice, but anyone can see them free with a watermark. We felt we should allow the audience to see the whole thing, and the person who wants to own it gets the limited-edition number.

We’re trying to create something where people can see it and buy it in a way that artists get paid and the next round of commissioning happens. Its aims are about paying the artists and continuing the business.

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Sara Ludy: Glass Dragons 2016
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Davide Quayola: Pleasant Places
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Jacolby Satterwhite: En Plein Air Abtraction
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Jonathan Monaghan: bitforms Back To The Garden
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Michael Manning: Chill Late Night Hang Out
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Rashaad Newsome: Shade compositions 2012 remix

Daata Editions et l’art de demain

In Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Fair, Asialyst, Brussels, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Digital, digital art, Independent, Jeff Koons, New York Times, Uncategorized, Video Art on 17/04/2016 at 10:37 am

Daat new flyer image pink April 2016

Franck Barthelemy feature on Daata Editions in Asialyst.

From the New York Times Conference: Art for Tomorrow in Doha, Qatar, March 2016. Posted to celebrate Daata Editions participation in the inaugural Independent Brussels April 2016.

La dernière conférence du New York Times Art for Tomorrow s’est tenue à Doha (Qatar) en mars dernier.
Le thème choisi pour 2016 n’est pas banal, même à Doha, une ville qui se projette sans complexe dans le XXIème siècle : Technology, Creativity and the City. Des intervenants prestigieux du monde des arts et au delà du monde de l’urbanisme ont échangé idées et arguments avec passion, parfois confusion.
Parmi elles, Charles Landry, HE Sheikha Al Mayassa, Wim Pijbes, Aric Chen, Jean Nouvel, David Gryn, Jeff Koons, Marina Abramovic et plusieurs dizaines d’autres.
J’ai particulièrement apprécié les débats sur l’art et l’internet, qu’il s’agisse d’accès, d’appréciation ou de modalité de vente.
Les partisans de l’art qu’on doit voir « en vrai » et ceux de l’art qu’on peut voir sur un écran se sont affrontés avec diplomatie pour aboutir à un dialogue du type anciens contre modernes.

Je crois que ce débat est persistant dans un monde où les technologies ne cessent d’évoluer.
Je crois aussi qu’il est inutile.
Il y aura toujours des amateurs de musées réels et des amateurs de musées virtuels.
Il y aura sans doute d’autres formes de « lieux » d’expositions dans les années à venir.
Et surtout, il y a déjà et il y aura encore de nouvelles formes d’art, des formes que les artistes inventent en fonction des technologies disponibles.

Je crois que le débat doit s’ouvrir à ces nouvelles formes d’art.
Par exemple, un son. Comment le fait-on entendre ? Dans le circuit des galeries ? Pas facile ! Quel prix attribuer à un son ? Comment l’artiste développeur de son peut-il vivre de son œuvre ? Comment distribuer un son ? Comment stocker un son ? On peut se poser les mêmes questions pour une succession d’images animées de 3 secondes par exemple. Ou encore, une vidéo de 1.5 minute.

L’initiative de David Gryn, un commissaire américain (le créateur de Film à Art Basel Miami Beach depuis 2011), spécialiste d’images animées, m’est apparue à cet égard remarquable.
Gryn a créé l’an dernier Daata Editions, une plateforme internet dédiée aux images animées, aux sons et aux courtes vidéos. Depuis plusieurs années, il se demandait comment promouvoir et développer un public pour les artistes qui produisent des images animées et des sons que l’on trouve parfois gratuitement sur internet sur les sites des artistes, et plus généralement nulle part excepté dans quelques musées ou des collections très spécialisés.

Sur ses propres fonds et initialement soutenu (grâce à la pratique du seed funding) par la collectionneuse et philanthrope Anita Zabludowicz, Gryn a conçu un site internet pour distribuer des images animées et des sons.
Son point de départ : comment aider ces artistes qui utilisent des supports multimédia que l’on n’expose pas dans les galeries et en conséquence qui sont peu vendus.
S’ils sont peu vendus, ils sont peu connus et n’ont donc aucune chance d’accéder à un large public.

Gryn propose en ligne des « saisons » qu’il commissionne à des artistes qu’il connaît personnellement ou qui lui sont recommandés.
Il fait son travail de commissaire et sélectionne quelques artistes. Il produit l’œuvre de l’artiste et l’achète.
Il propose ensuite de vendre sur la plateforme internet une édition de 15 en général. Pour chaque vente, l’artiste touche une royaltie.

La première « saison » a présenté le travail de 18 artistes, spécialement conçu pour être vendu sur la plateforme.
A peu près 300 œuvres ont été vendues en ligne à un peu de moins de 100 clients.
Le prix d’une œuvre varie de quelques centaines à quelques milliers de dollars.

Le site n’est pas une galerie en ligne mais une plateforme de distribution.
Chaque artiste est montré de la même façon. Personne n’est mis en avant.
L’acheteur potentiel doit faire un choix parmi les artistes de la saison en cours. Il doit être actif et exercer son sens critique pour passer à l’acte d’achat.
L’acheteur doit trouver les images, le son ou la vidéo qu’il veut, qu’il recherche ou tout simplement qui l’interpellera.
Au bout du compte, il se retrouvera avec un fichier sur son ordinateur qu’il appréciera seul, qu’il partagera avec des amis, qu’il mettra peut-être en scène chez lui.

Gryn n’a pas l’intention d’attirer sur la plateforme les fonds d’investissement qui font et défont les cotes des artistes contemporains.
Il partage naïvement avec d’autres collectionneurs ce qu’il trouve bon et intéressant, parfois avec l’aide d’autres experts ou amateurs de son entourage. Gryn construit un écosystème pour soutenir de nouvelles formes d’art immatérielles.
Pour le moment, Dataa Editions est une petite start-up qui emploie une personne à mi-temps.
Compte tenu de l’évolution constante des formes d’art et des technologies pour les réaliser, je peux aisément imaginer que la petite start-up deviendra grande.

En fait, le succès de l’entreprise de David Gryn a peu d’importance.
Il ouvre une réflexion sur la distribution des œuvres d’art, matérielles et immatérielles. Il nous propose d’imaginer de nouvelles voies, de nouveaux écosystèmes pour soutenir la création.
Les conversations de Doha ont porté davantage sur les lieux et les infrastructures pour accueillir la création.
Peut-être que l’an prochain, pourraient- elles porter sur les nouvelles formes d’art dans la citée et les nouveaux écosystèmes pour les encourager ?

Franck Barthelemy
Diplomé de l’EDHEC, Franck rejoint d’abord le corps diplomatique comme attaché commercial auprès de l’ambassade de France de Bombay en 1993. Il a depuis quitté la diplomatie pour le monde des affaires mais il n’a jamais perdu sa passion pour l’Inde ; passion qui l’a conduit a développer un nouveau modèle de développement pour les ONG indiennes. L’art n’étant jamais très loin, il est depuis 2009, consultant et découvreur de talents artistiques pour collectionneurs.

Article in Asialyst

https://asialyst.com/fr/2016/04/12/daata-editions-et-lart-de-demain/

Interviews from Yale University Radio WYBCX by Brainard Carey

In Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, artists, Artprojx, Artworld, Brainard Carey, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, digital art, Interviews, Moving Image, Video Art, WYBCX, Yale, Yale University, Yale University Radio on 13/07/2015 at 6:21 pm

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Interviews from Yale University Radio WYBCX

Conversations with artists, writers, curators and more – about art and the art world as we know it.

Hosted by Brainard Carey

Quite a few names here:

G. Roger Denson
Kathy Battista
Buzz Spector
Connie Butler
Rob Garrett
Brian Buttler
Sans façon
Uta Kögelsberger
Steve Katz
Jack Sal
Michael Workman
Colin Westerbeck
Susan Silas
Paula Hayes
Bruno Leitão
Lee Boroson
David Gryn
Helen Molesworth
Nils Norman
Heidi Voet
Khosro Adibi
Adam Moskowitz
Emily Cheng
Christian Siekmeier
Regine Basha
Conor Fields
Chris Verene
Barry N. Neuman
Barbara A. MacAdam
Jason Middlebrook
Shaheen Merali
Jennifer Parker
Cristiana de Marchi
Kevin Clarke
Dotty Attie
Simone Battisti
Céline Condorelli
Rachael Gorchov
Bérénice Reynaud
Stephan Balleux
Warren Neidich
Saul Melman
Sue Stoffel
Michael Steinberg
Liz Rosenfeld
Bonnie Marranca
Karim Noureldin
Tim Sullivan
Allard van Hoorn
Joseph Nechvatal
Christian L. Frock
Siona Benjamin
Toni Kleinlercher
Stephan Pascher
Anton Kern
Catarina Leitão
Ramesch Daha
Nancy Chaikin
Elena Cologni
Jacob Fabricius
Stephen Lack
Richard West
Steven Rand
Laura F. Gibellini
Valerie Sonnenthal
Mary Mattingly
Suzanne Landau
Ilya Budraitskis
Ofri Cnaani
Matthew Rose
Christina McPhee
Chris Wilder
Stefan Bruggeman
Jelle Bouwhuis
Robert Storr
Anuradha Vikram
Jason Yates
Derek Boshier
Rainer Judd
Ingrid Bachmann
Cora Cohen
Roger Herman
Michelle Grabner
Susan Leopold
Diane Lewis
Flora Fairbairn
RaúI Zamudio
Ben Mills
Carla Camacho
Giuliana Bruno
Brett Littman
Jeff Talman
Maurizio Bortolotti
Chiemi Karasawa
Alejandro Zaera-Polo
Joe Davis
Lawrence R. Rinder
Dane Jensen
Jorge Pardo
David Balzer
Laurie Rosenwald
Marlen Suyapa Bodden
Erwin Redl
Rafal Niemojewski
Douglas I. Sheer
Elizabeth Dunbar
Bill Arning
Rachel Cook
Rebecca Belmore
Rui Amaral
Gaëtane Verna
Duane Michals
Joyce Kozloff
Ann Landi
Jo-Anne McArthur
Heather Nicol
Lara Almarcegui
Pacita Abad Art Estate / Interview with Jack Garrity
Katrin Sigurdardottir
Tyler Barstow
Barbara Rachko
Mira Schor
Deborah Kass
Nancy Spector
Vicki DaSilva
Michael David
Gary Lucas
Susan Sollins
Dave Hardy
Erin Shirreff
Jenna Lash
Karyn Olivier
Judy Glantzman
Betty Cuningham
Barry Schwabsky
Lawrence Weiner
Barbara Gallucci
Ida Applebroog
Stanley Casselman
Todd Levin
David Hickey
Jennifer Steinkamp
Adam Putnam
Richard Klein
Ann Lauterbach
Linda Yablonsky
Tamar Ettun
Derek Larson
Jo Nigoghossian
Ken Lum
Eve Andree Laramee
Carol Snow
Robert Taplin
Ester Partegas
Joan Snyder
Sheri Pasquarella
Raphael Rubinstein
Kimsooja
Brooke Kamin Rapaport
Marie Lorenz
Annette Lemieux
Nancy Princenthal
Christoph Heinrich
Gregory Volk
Robin Hill
Nina Katchadourian
WIlliam Pope L.
Chrissie Iles
Jen Durbin
Lisa Hoke
Rick Beerhorst
Arthur Danto (from 2011)
Barbra Drizin
Rita Reed
Katrina Mayer
Peter Ragnar
Grace Graupe Pillard
Sid Limitz
Paul Miller, aka DJ Spooky
John Currin
Mary Ceruti, Sculpture Center
Sarah Thornton
Catya Plate
Fred Wilson
Spencer Tunick
David Batchelor
Tom Sachs
Mary Heilman
Marilyn Mintner
Gregory Crewdson
Grayson Cox
David Wolfe, Raw food nutritionist
Ken Aronson, (hell.com)
Daniel Salin
Nato Thompson
Dan Cameron
Shamim Momin
David Ross
Abbey Ryan
Laura Hoptman

Martha Fiennes – Nativity and a talk on Digital Art at the V & A – Fri 19 Dec 6.30

In Art Basel, Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, BFI, digital art, Discussion, Kensington, MPC, Nativity, SLOimage, V & A on 18/12/2014 at 10:06 am
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Martha Fiennes: Nativity (still)

Martha FiennesNativity

and a discussion on Digital Art with:

Martha Fiennes, Pete Muggleston, Francesca Gavin, Eddie Berg, and David Gryn

Friday 19 December, 6.30pm-8pm 

Victoria and Albert Museum

South Kensington
Cromwell Road
London SW7 2RL

The Lydia & Manfred Gorvy Lecture Theatre

TICKETS

EVENING EVENT: Join award-winning artist and director Martha Fiennes and producer Pete Muggleston in discussion with the writer, curator and visual arts editor Francesca Gavin, the film and creative technology specialist Eddie Berg, and David Gryn, Director, Artprojx worldwide and curator, Film at Art Basel.

The discussion is chaired by Ben Latham Jones, Head of Ealing Studios and Film Producer. They will talk about the launch of the world’s first digital painting – SLOimage Nativity. Completely self-generating, the mesmerising image has been inspired by the great paintings of Renaissance art. The panel will discuss this project and the possibilities opened up by the new technology.

Organised in collaboration with SLOimage

Find out more about SLOimages.

18.30 – 20.00

Free, booking essential

or via the V & A bookings office +44 (0)20 7942 2211

http://www.vam.ac.uk/whatson/event/3598/martha-fiennes-nativity-5116/

David Gryn Notes for the talk:

The future is digital. …. No … The future is humans.

I work with artists film with a speciality in artists digital moving image and sound. But my real interest is in people. People as audience, artists, collaborators, technical and venue support, networks of marketing support, artworld connections.

I generally aim to work on projects with people I like, trust, admire and the chances are is that I like something about their work. There are very few artists whom I know I love their work. All other artists are making works that take on risk and usually I only know what I think after the outcome of working with them and digesting their work. Some times it takes years or even centuries.

There are reasons based on humans chemistry why we like certain artworks, artists, projects. Often we have no knowledge of the work before seeing it. We pay to see films without knowing or liking the works in advance.

The artworld is very particular and very peculiar. And it is always curious that there is an inherent demand and need to know more and be knowing prior, during and after an art experience – as opposed to just being with the work.

It is in this just beingness that I believe. The experience of music, film, theatre, ballet resides often in that moment of encounter with an art form. The forces that drive an audience are often the people in or connected to the work.

But we are getting to a point where I believe true art is being made using digital mediums as the enamour of the material is waning as it is such a natural language for most new artists now and the technology and distribution is increasingly better and cheaper. However audiences and consumers need to be worked on, developed, established, nurtured like all other art forms. One such method is the digital domain – And thus the mythology of social media. It is socialising we need at art events – social media is just a communications mean to an end. The end should be people are coming to an event. But with art it isn’t that straight forward.

https://www.academia.edu/10014579/The_future_is_digital_No_The_future_is_humans