David Gryn blog

Posts Tagged ‘artist’

EXPO Sound at EXPO CHICAGO curated by Daata Editions

In Chicago, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Expo Chicago, Navy Pier, Sound, Uncategorized on 11/08/2017 at 11:45 am
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Image: Larry Achiampong, The Ascent (100 Degrees), 2016

EXPO CHICAGO partners with Daata Editions and Navy Pier to present the inaugural EXPO Sound program (September 13–17, 2017). Curated by Daata Editions, an online platform for the sale of commissioned artist video, sound and web art editions, launching new artworks by selected international artists—the program featuring artists: Larry Achiampong, Tracey Emin, Leo Gabin, Rashaad Newsome and Hannah Perry, will be complemented by works from artists represented by EXPO CHICAGO 2017 Exhibitors.

“Artist sound—like artist video, performance and digital work—is being increasingly exhibited due to the dynamic and experiential nature of the medium, paired with its all-encompassing and ephemeral presence,” said Daata Editions Director David Gryn. “The artist as performer, musician and entertainer is ever sought after in our global calendar of art events, but somewhere in all of this is the truth and essence of art making, with the outcome of very real, tangible and brilliant works of art.”

Sound is truly art for everyone. You can try and contain it – but when it is released it purvades our every pore. 

Last year in walking around the Navy Pier – I realised that I couldn’t escape from the piped pop music of Britney Spears through the public speaker system, which for the area of a food mall makes sense, but for the path leading to an art fair – not so much sense. So I mention this, in my incredulity, to Fair director Tony Karman and he simply responds “why don’t you curate Sound for 2017 ?”

So this year EXPO Sound is born, playing artist sound works primarily from Daata Editions commissioned artists as well as selected works from Expo Chicago gallery submissions. 

The program will be installed throughout the public speaker system at Navy Pier—along the South Dock, within the exposition entrance, and on the /Dialogues Stage.

2017 EXPO Sound Artists:
Larry Achiampong | Daata Editions
Tracey Emin | Daata Editions
Leo Gabin | Daata Editions
Jared Madere | David Lewis Gallery, New York
Rashaad Newsome | Daata Editions
Hannah Perry | Daata Editions
Cheryl Pope | moniquemeloche, Chicago
Xaviera Simmons | David Castillo Gallery, Miami
Nick van Woert | GRIMM, Amsterdam

GUIDED TOUR OF EXPO SOUND: DAVID GRYN. Friday September 17 at 3:00pm. Join curator David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions (www.daata-editions.com) for an exclusive guided tour of the inaugural program of EXPO Sound. Launching new artworks by select international artists, the program will be complemented by artists represented by EXPO CHICAGO 2017 Exhibitors, installed throughout the public speaker system at Navy Pier.

Daata Editions features Artist Sound at Soho House Chicago with Scott Reeder, David Gryn and Amanda Schmitt in conversation (Sept 12) and launching a new sound project on Daata, A/V curated by Amanda Schmitt featuring new sound works by Maria Antelman, Alexandra Drewchin, FlucT, Marina Rosenfeld.

For more information, visit: https://www.expochicago.com/ & https://daata-editions.com/

See ArtNews

 

Text for Jane Bustin by Anthony Rudolf

In abstraction, Anthony Rudolf, Berlin, Gallery, Jane Bustin, Leslie, Minimal, painting, Uncategorized on 05/07/2017 at 6:53 pm
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Jane Bustin, Fühler at Leslie, Berlin

TEXT FOR JANE BUSTIN
Anthony Rudolf

What could be less verbal than a Jane Bustin painting?

What could be more verbal than a Mallarmé poem?

‘One does not write with ideas but with words’, Mallarmé said to Degas, who fancied himself as a poet and had plenty of ideas.

As Borges might have said, we would expect the first livre d’artiste to have been created by Mallarmé (as translator) and Manet: Poe’s ‘Raven’, and we would be right.

Let me rephrase my first sentence: not what could be less verbal but what could be more silent than a Jane Bustin painting? After all, Debussy’s La Mer is as wordless as a Bustin painting. Silent it is not.

(Debussy set one of Mallarmé’s most significant poems, ‘L’Après-midi d’un faune’, to music. Mallarmé told Degas: ‘I thought I had already set it to music’).

My answer to the question posed above — what could be more silent than a Jane Bustin painting? — is a dead child whose absence his poet father commemorates, that “absence [which] is condensed presence” (the phrase is from a letter of Emily Dickinson, a poet well worth reading “against” Mallarmé).

The dead child is Anatole Mallarmé, whom Jane Bustin too commemorates and whose existence breathes into, inspires, Jane Bustin’s paintings, via the father’s heart-rending posthumously published poem.

It is neither paradoxical nor ironic that Jane Bustin depends so heavily on words during the gestation of her work exhibited at Test-tube. Goya went further: he included words inside the visual image.

Mallarmé would have reacted to these paintings with silence. He was always eloquent.

By Anthony Rudolf 2012

from
European Hours: Collected Poems by Anthony Rudolf

Born in London in 1942, Anthony Rudolf has two children and two grandchildren. He is the author of books of literary criticism (on Primo Levi, Piotr Rawicz and others), autobiography (The Arithmetic of Memory) and poetry (The Same River Twice and collaborations with artists), and translator of books of poetry from French (Bonnefoy, Vigée, Jabès), Russian (Vinokourov and Tvardovsky) and other languages. He has edited various anthologies. His essay on R.B. Kitaj was published by the National Gallery in 2001, and he has published essays on other painters. He is Paula Rego’s partner and main male model. He has completed a volume of short stories and is now at work on two new memoirs. His reviews, articles, poems, translations, obituaries and interviews with writers have appeared in numerous journals. Rudolf is an occasional broadcaster on radio and television and founder of Menard Press. After a lifetime of uninvolving day jobs, he became Visiting Lecturer in Arts and Humanities at London Metropolitan University (2000-2003) and Royal Literary Fund fellow at the Universities of Hertfordshire and Westminster (2003-2008). In 2004, he was appointed Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture and, in 2005, he was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature

Jane Bustin, Fühler at Leslie, Berlin

http://lesliegallery.de/jane-bustin/

Jane Bustin, Fühler at Leslie, Berlin 22 June

In Art, Berlin, Ceramics, Copper, Copperfield, Gallery, Jane Bustin, Leslie, Paintings, Poppy Bowers, Uncategorized, Whitworth on 18/06/2017 at 11:41 am
3D work by Jane Bustin

Rehearsal II, copper, acrylic, oxides, cloth
80cm x 50 cm overall, Jane Bustin, 2015

Jane Bustin

Fühler

Opening: 22.6.17, 6 pm
Exhibition: 23.6.17 – 20.7.17

Leslie

Bergfriedstraße 20
10969 Berlin

http://lesliegallery.de/

Since the 18th century, European philosophers have distinguished our capacity to feel subjectively from our ability to think rationally. We are sentient beings. As the late neurologist and author Oliver Sacks claimed, ‘perception is never purely in the present – it has to be drawn on experience of the past’. Jane Bustin’s exhibition Fühler, to have feelers or sensors about a given subject, calls on this capacity.

Bustin’s approach to painting foregrounds a conscious experience of material surface and texture. Although abstract, her works are evocations of people and histories. They are grounded in a range of intellectual sources, primarily European modernist poetry, design and literature as well as theology and philosophy. Such concepts are given physical expression through her intuitive arrangements of materials. Oil, dyed silk, porcelain, woven cloth, polished copper, tulle and ceramic glazes are just some of the media used to give shape and feeling to philosophical ideas. Born out of the tactile, her works are Fühler; they are imbued with a sensory memory and resonate with emotion.

Four works in the show, Apres II, Nijinsky I, Nijinksy’s Windows and Rehearsal II, pay tribute to the radical Russian ballet dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinksy (1890-1950). Rising to prominence as part of the belle epoch, Nijinksy combined depth and intensity of expression with symmetry to pioneer new stylistic ideas in modern dance, echoed in the compositional balance of Bustin’s three textural diptychs.

In Après II textile becomes a stand-in for the body and the memory of its physical activity. It takes its cue from Nijinsky’s choreography of the ballet L’apres midi d’un Faun in 1912, where the movement of fabric is used as a metaphor for sexual desire and physical exhaustion. Like most of Bustin’s works the scale is of human proportions. Hung quite low, Apres II sits on the wall around the height of the artist’s heart.

Elsewhere, earlier works in the exhibition include Christina the Astonishing, part of a series referencing the iconography of female saints and Tablet I, Tablet III and Tablet IV, evoking archaic forms of communication. Combining sheets of paper from both old and new notebooks, they prompt memories of the past alongside thoughts of the future.

Refusing to be filmed during his lifetime, Nijinsky strongly believed his performances should only be experienced live. Likewise Bustin prefers her works to be encountered in real time under the honest inconsistency of natural light. Like the tip of antennae, one’s eyes should roam over surface, roll over folds, shift focus through diaphanous layers and peer into copper reflections. Her works call upon an understanding of Fühler and our capacity to feel as sentient beings. They ask us to look again.

Text by Poppy Bowers, Curator, Whitworth Gallery, Manchester

Exhibited works

Facebook Event

FILM COLOGNE curated by Daata Editions

In A Goth Life, Art Fair, artcologne, artists, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Uncategorized on 24/03/2017 at 4:37 pm

Art Cologne and Daata logos

FILM COLOGNE: A Goth Life curated by Daata Editions. A special exhibition of artists and artworks from Daata Editions.

Art Cologne, April 26-29, 2017

The FILM COLOGNE section is dedicated to the medium of artists moving image and was introduced at ART COLOGNE three years ago. With the special exhibition “A Goth Life”, this year’s edition of ART COLOGNE will show a compilation from artwork editions curated by and selected from Daata Editions.

A Goth Life is a selection of artist works that compiled together make a composite tale of our joyously soulless, self-reflective, insular, tension and angst ridden times. The use of the internet is our guide, confident, entertainment, mirror, window, general outlet and has created a real alternative social reality, with artists commentating on and providing a contemporary anthropology for this coming of age. This will play throughout the days of the art fair. A Goth Life is playing each day on a repeated cycle.

Artists in “A Goth Life” include: Larry Achiampong, Thora Dolven Balke, David Blandy, Jake Chapman, Jacky Connolly, Keren Cytter, Casey Jane Ellison, Tracey Emin, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Yung Jake, Rachel Maclean, Jillian Mayer, Takeshi Murata, Rashaad Newsome, Tameka Norris, Hannah Perry, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Scott Reeder, Jacolby Satterwhite, Zadie Xa.

Features from artists on Daata Editions:  Sue de Beer, David Blandy/Larry Achiampong, Jacky Connolly, Matt Copson, Keren Cytter, Casey Jane Ellison, Leo Gabin, Rachel Maclean, Jillian Mayer & Lucas Leyva, Takeshi Murata & Robert Beatty, Hannah Perry, Scott Reeder, John Skoog, Chloe Wise, Zadie Xa.

Daata Editions will also feature NAUSEA – A VR Exhibition by Metaphysics featuring artists: Eddie Peake, Florian Meisenberg, Anne de Vries, Rubén Grilo, Jack Strange and Anna K.E. www.metaphysicsvr.com

See the full schedule in the Art Cologne Press Release

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Image: Alexithyma by Jacky Connolly, 2017 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

DAATA EDITIONS on UNTITLED, RADIO at UNTITLED, SAN FRANCISCO

In Art Fair, artists, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Hannah Perry, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, John Skoog, Leo Gabin, radio, Radiooooo.com, Sound, Uncategorized, Untitled on 12/01/2017 at 10:38 am
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Leo Gabin, Break Up, 2015 (courtesy the artists and Daata Editions)

DAATA EDITIONS on UNTITLED, RADIO

UNTITLED, SAN FRANCISCO
Sunday January 15, 2017 at 12 noon (PST)
Artists: Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, Leo Gabin, John Skoog and Hannah Perry.

On Sunday January 15 at 12 noon (PST) on Untitled, Radio, Daata Editions Director, David Gryn will present sound works by artists Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, Leo Gabin, John Skoog and Hannah Perry.

UNTITLED, RADIO – A live broadcast that takes the place of the customary program of conversations and talks, offering a unique roster of interviews, performances, curated playlists, and sound-based works.

UNTITLED, RADIO is organized by Director of Programming and Development, Amanda Schmitt with San Francisco Programming and Development Advisor, Juana Berrio.

UNTITLED, ART is an international, curated art fair founded in 2012 that focuses on curatorial balance and integrity across all disciplines of contemporary art. Untitled, Art innovates the standard fair model by selecting a curatorial team to identify, and curate a selection of galleries, artist-run exhibition spaces, and non-profit institutions and organizations, in dialogue with an architecturally designed venue. Since 2014 the curatorial team has consisted of Christophe Boutin, Omar López-Chahoud and Melanie Scarciglia. The inaugural edition of UNTITLED, SAN FRANCISCO will take place at the historic Pier 70 in the Dogpatch neighborhood, January 13 – 15, 2017.

THE WATTIS INSTITUTE for Contemporary Arts will build a temporary bar on-site at the fair, inspired by the Wattis Bar – an intimate gathering place designed by the artist Oscar Tuazon. The bar will serve as the hub for Untitled, Radio, as a site to host public programs, and a meeting place throughout the course of the fair.

DAATA EDITIONS commissions artist video, sound, poetry and web. This new and innovative way to collect art is designed specifically to be a native platform to a new generation of artists who work with moving image and sound. Limited edition artworks can be viewed and acquired as digital downloads.

Artworks selected from Daata Editions are …

Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen – Bamboo Grove
Leo Gabin – The Heart Wants
Leo Gabin – Awesome
Leo Gabin – Break Up
Leo Gabin – Aliens
John Skoog – iPhone
John Skoog – Marijuana Mars
Hannah Perry – Sick off smoke
Hannah Perry – Keep the peace

These are all available to hear and acquire at http://daata-editions.com

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Keren Cytter on Reinventing the Rules of Filmmaking – Artspace interview by Loney Abrams

In Andrew Goldstein, Art Basel, Artspace, Daata Editions, Digital, Frieze, keren cytter, Loney Abrams, Uncategorized, Video on 13/10/2016 at 5:35 pm

 

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Image Still: Keren Cytter, Terrorist of Love, 2016 (a Free Downloadable Artwork – commissioned by Daata Editions and Artspace)

Keren Cytter on Reinventing the Rules of Filmmaking (or, How to Manipulate Your Audience) by Loney Abrams, Artspace.

It’s difficult to speak about Keren Cytter’s oeuvre holistically, only because she’s such a prolific artist that it’s almost impossible to view it all. The Israeli-born, New York-based filmmaker and writer has produced over 60 videos; published seven books that include novels, poetry, and screenplays; and is also the founder of dance company Dance International Europe Now (aka D.I.E. Now.)… and she’s hasn’t even turned 40.

Like Martin Heidegger’s famous hammer, which only reveals its true nature once it breaks or otherwise fails to function, Cytter’s films employ cliché to set up familiar reference points only to break them down—with poorly dubbed dialogue, fragmented or repetitious story-lines, and subtitles that address the viewer, for example­—and reveal the cinematic conventions that are normally invisible to us.

Cytter’s bag of tricks is chock-full of immediately identifiable tropes, from overly dramatized Hollywood mobster and thriller genre films, that have been delivered so adeptly by directors like Francis Ford Coppola, Alfred Hitchcock, and Quentin Tarantino. But Cytter’s use of these devices don’t quite fit—instead, they feel willfully clumsy and absurd. The 2014 video Rose Garden ends as a young boy is shot with a rifle after stealing a disco ball from the kind of timeless Midwestern dive bar you might expect to see in No Country for Old Men. The boy, refereed to by his bartending parents as both “Scott” and “Stock,” had shot his mother a few seconds before for no discernible reason, and the two murders (of which there are four total in the nine-minute-long film) seemed to bear no relation to one another.

Equally disorienting, the film Four Seasons (2009) starts with a shot of blood dripping onto white tile as a wounded man sits in a bathtub with snow falling around him. After the opening credit sequence, a woman enters the bathroom to ask the man to turn his music down, which she can hear from the apartment next door. The man yells twice, “Stella!” (presumably in reference to Marlon Brando‘s oft-parodied line from A Streetcar Named Desire) and the woman replies, “My name is Lucy, man,” before conversation unfolds casually as if nothing is out of the ordinary. Cytter uses clichés like cinematic readymades, using them to piece together disjointed, fragmented, often absurdist narratives. As a viewer, it sometimes feels as if, through her exaggerated use of cinematic conventions, Cytter is reminding us that we’re watching a film.

Humor, some theorists believe, is experienced when a person’s worldview is turned on its head for a split-second, and then revealed to be only temporary, a joke. Cytter’s films are funny—funny in a smart, dry way that challenges the viewer’s relationship to film. In Cytter’s Video Art Manual, the artist illustrates, quite literally, the filmic conventions and cinematic clichés that she subverts in her work.

The video begins with a young man in a suit sitting at a desk addressing the camera: “In this informal presentation I will try to unfold the great mysteries of new medias and reveal the utopian anxieties of the common man.” By then, we can already assume that this won’t be a straightforward educational film by the way the audio inexplicably changes volume mid-sentence, at times becoming unsynchronized with the actor’s lips. This scene segues into the next with a countdown that only goes from “five…” to “four…,” leading into a montage of news footage that introduces a second narrative, an impending cataclysmic solar flare event, that continues to weave in and out of the rest of the film.

Characters preparing for this imminent environmental catastrophe shift between inhabiting their roles as fictional characters and acting as actors who are playing their characters’ parts. We see one actor selling himself during a casting call, though his rehearsed speech makes it obvious that this too is an act. “You’ve got to take me, I’m multitalented. I speak three languages, sprechen sie Deutsch, y hablo Español,” the actor says before spouting off generic textbook Spanish phrases, while a superimposed subtitle reads, “The performers aren’t as concerned with their acting skills as they are representing familiar characters and situations. Subtitles help to distract the viewer from bad acting and visual mistakes.” Cytter’s films may follow some sort of narrative thrust, but the meat of the work’s content can be found on the bones—the form, the structure that is conventionally out of site but is foregrounded for Cytter. We as viewers are as aware of the off-screen editor, the director, the script writer (who are all, of course, Cytter), as we are the actors onscreen.

For an artist making self-reflexive medium-specific work, Cytter sure does work in a number of media. In 2008, Cytter expanded into the world of theater, founding her dance company, D.I.E. Now. Their first production, The True Story of John Webber and His Endless Struggle With the Table of Content was as much Samuel Beckett as it was “Disney on Ice.” Combining dance, video, music (composed by Cytter herself), and spoken text, the artist worked with non-professional performers—a trademark Cytter carried over from her video work. The production was performed at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in London in 2009.

Cytter’s most recent work is yet another departure from her cinematic mainstays. Terrorist of Love, commissioned by Artspace and Daata Editions (and available as a free download here), is a music video, and uses imagery native to the Internet—two firsts for the artist.  Using a fixed 4K camera, Cytter shot the video in one take, before devising an unconventional video format in post-production solely using key framing, meme-like imagery, and an original soundtrack—an unprecedented approach to video-making in any genre. Here, Artspace’s Loney Abrams talks to the artist about making Terrorist of Love, her self-imposed rules of production, addictive Instagram habits, and the artist’s unfulfilled desire to make her audience feel sad.

Terrorist of Love seems to be the first video you’ve made that is soundtrack driven. How did the idea come about?

I hadn’t made anything like this before. I was in Israel and I was visiting my friend who is a musician, and I asked him for songs. He had this one and I decided to work on it. Then I said, “Okay, we can replace him with performers.” So that’s what we did!

Would you consider it a music video?

I’d say it’s a music video, yeah. [Laughs.] I made up a structure to follow: I will use a very good camera and will shoot two performers on a roof, lip-syncing and casually dancing to the song, and after that, I will zoom into the frame and let the camera move to the shift of the music, on different details of the shot.

What are the lyrics?

Terrorist of Love / Turkish Delight / Search me / Search me. I think it’s a love song, using political words. I made up the choreography.

Have you used meme-type imagery before or is this new too?

On my Instagram yes, but no, never in a video. It doesn’t ever fit with a plot so I could never do it.

Can you talk about your Instagram?

I’m obsessed. I was in rehab for three weeks!

You’re addicted to Instagram?

Yeah, my friend told me I should stop. I should stop. I think I’m really neurotic so that’s why I’m doing it. Instead of biting my nails I’m posting on Instagram. I got addicted, and I’m trying to post less—that’s why I’m erasing posts all the time. Also, I decide to always have less than 1,000.

1,000 posts? 

Images in in general, yeah. Because, to me, it looks vulgar if I have a lot. I also don’t follow people who post too much. That’s why I don’t like myself so much for doing it. I’m much less exclusive when I post a lot.

Sometimes an artist’s work becomes devalued when the artist overproduces. The demand can’t keep up with supply. You talk about your Instagram as if it’s going to lose value if you over-post!

No, it’s not that—I just don’t like people that post a lot. It means they have no life, and as you can see, I have tons of life. [Laughter.] No, I don’t know, I just post images all the time because whenever I have an empty moment I start to correct images and post instead of reading or doing something constructive. Like I told Fabian [an actor in Cytter’s upcoming theater performance], “Let’s go outside and bring the book,” so we brought the book and then I just sat outside posting images.

I’ve been following your Instagram for a while, and I’ve notice you use a lot of hashtags, which become poetic in a sense because they really aren’t useful as hashtags. It seems like sometimes the images on Instagram are secondary to your comments and hashtags.

It’s a lack of confidence sometimes. I think that my images are not good enough so I try to pump them up with the right hashtags. I want to express myself but I think sometimes images are not expressing myself. And sometimes I just don’t have good images! With all the life I have, I don’t have juicy, juicy images! [Laughs.]

In your films, what is more important, the images or the language?

I think the images, generally. The images are not connected very well, so I need lots of language to pull them together. Actually, there is one thing that’s funny with Terrorist of Love. Even if I use a good-quality camera it always comes out really bad, and for this video I used a 4K. So it’s a 4K image, but because you get into the frame, the quality comes out worse than any normal camera. So I said, “Oh, I’m keeping my line of bad images!”

In the first 10 seconds of the video, I thought you were zooming in and out on a still photograph—but then I began to realize that parts of the image were animated, and it was actually a video.

Yeah, well the camera didn’t move the whole time. That was my initial plan: to do everything like voyeurism in the frame.

Yeah, it’s amazing how dynamic you were able to make it without moving the camera. There’s so much going on in the video even though there was really very little activity on set.

Yeah I think people will really enjoy watching it… I think. I like it a lot. It’s going to be cute. It’s like, all Disney.

The scenery is so New York. It’s shot on a rooftop covered in graffiti, overlooking the Manhattan skyline. This kind of scenery is kind of cliché for a certain type of music video—but Terrorist of Love is so not the type of video you’d imagine in this setting.

[Laughs.] Yeah. At first I imagined filming it with the musician who wrote the song at his place in Israel. When we used to work together we got along very well, but when I left Israel 13 years ago, we became a bit like my characters and started drifting apart. I realized I’d be happier to do it not with him, but just to give him the video in the end. So that’s why I imposed everything I planned to do in Israel just on New York. To get into the frame with the sound of the music as the goal.

Your films are really transparent about the medium. So, sure, they’re about some characters, and there’s a storyline, but they’re also about people who are acting in front of a camera, and people who are reading scripts, and people who are making a film—in a way that makes the viewer very aware that they are watching a video. And in more recent years, you’ve also started doing live performances and theater. So I’m wondering how you carry the meta-narrative onto the stage?

Actually it’s quite easy. Now I’m doing a script for a theater we’re going to do. Suzy starts saying, “You might know me from other performances as in—just kidding, I never get the roll.” So you just need to say it and it’s there. It’s just a matter of marking it. You always know that it’s an act. I didn’t invent it, you know so, it’s quite easy— you just play all the time between those worlds.

Audiences obviously have very different expectations when they’re watching film or they’re watching theater. I imagine with film you’re able, through editing, to better direct how your audiences experience the film. You probably can’t do this as easily with theater. Is your audience on your mind when you’re making your work?

I see myself as my audience. When I see a theater play, I’m judging it. So the first thing I had to do when I wrote the text for Suzy is pull one over on the audience, to shock them so that after they stop judging and get into the plot. I like to have a plot but also I like the audience not to forget that they’re watching a play, or watching a film. I hate to waste my time watching other people’s stories. I like when things are not clear to me. I also like that I can feel things—I like to get sad. But I’m not so good at making sad things, I’m better at humor. People are more attached to things if they are feeling sad, so I try to make sad things now, but it’s really embarrassing me.

So your motivation to make sad stories comes not from necessarily having sad stories to tell but wanting people to feel sad?

Yes, exactly. It’d be great if they can’t understand what the story was but they say, “It was so sad.” That would be great because it means I really manipulated them.

In Video Art Manual, the format you’ve set up is similar to a how-to video and then woven into that is this kind of absurdist narrative about an impending apocalyptic solar flare event.

Ah yes.

And then on top of that you’re also bringing the viewer into it by commenting on their experience, and so I’m wondering how you differentiate, or if you differentiate, between narrative and content?

Well for me the content is actually the structure of things, not the narrative itself. The narrative is just an excuse for the audience to keep on following. With the solar flame, I was a bit consumed by it. I read it and I was really worried for my job because they said there will be an electricity power cut, and I said “How can I make videos?” and I said “Oh, I can make drawings.”

I mentioned several times in the video the solar flame and the consequences because that will make the audience keep on watching it, and, for me, that narrative is more interesting than the history of video art. So for me the structures and the frames are much more interesting than the narrative, and the narrative is just for the audience. And it’s also a way for the images to come together so I can smash different things and it will make sense for you because there is some kind of narrative—my excuse for it.

So making a narrative is just an excuse—

To create structures, yeah.

So the narrative gives you an excuse to make a formal film. You also use many different languages in your films and I wonder if that’s an excuse to use subtitles and text as another play on form?

Yeah. Right. Also, you see an Italian movie and it’s not acted well or you don’t get the language so you just say, “Oh, it’s the Italian”—that’s what I think, “Oh, it’s the Italian, Italians are like that.” But when I was in Italy I made a movie there and I asked one of the girls to act like Anna Magnani and she knew exactly what I meant and I realized she was acting a certain way—it’s not like the way Italians act normally, so I was right.

What’s your writing process like? Would you walk us through how you get from point A to B?

It’s depressing actually, I just don’t leave the house. That’s why I’m posting a lot. I have no life so because I need to write all the time. I need to find an idea and until I have an idea I cannot write. It’s better not to write until I have the idea, and then when I start writing I write halfway through and I think it’s fine, and then I realize I cannot continue because the idea is not finished, it doesn’t have enough rules. I need to have more rules and more framing.

What do you mean by rules?

For example I made a Russian movie in Russia with naked people—lots of penises. It’s a very classic movie—the camera doesn’t move. I needed some rules… nine shots with no zoom in and no panning; three acts with three shots in each act. I was in Russia and I was googling “crazy Russians” and I found a crazy image of Russians taping up their apartment with plastic and then flooding it like a swimming pool. My backyard is really fitting for that, actually. That was in my head, that I wanted to turn my backyard into a swimming pool. So I decided to make a movie because of this image.

Because it was with Russians I could do it hardcore, and there were lots of penises and porn and stuff like that. I thought also, because it’s Russians, it’s a bit political because of the power shift I think now in the world. So there were three guys and one girl because I’m concerned about women’s rights, and then it begins actually representing minorities in general. At the end of each act, one of them dies, but keeps on living in the next act. So that was part of the rules.

Another rule was that it needed to be in Russian, and the camera doesn’t move so they need some time to lower themselves to fit into the frame. Maybe there were more things that I forgot. But I need lots of rules just in order to write.

I’m thinking about this device you’re using in Terrorist of Love where you don’t move the camera. The video is static with no cuts. It seems super contemporary, actually, in that a lot of video we’re seeing are coming directly from people’s iPhones. For example, on Facebook Live or Periscope, it’s live-streamed and you can’t make edits. We’re probably getting used to seeing more of these really long takes.

Ah, yeah, that’s cool. Actually in cinema, that’s what counts as a good thing—if the take is long. And subconsciously I think it somehow stays with you. At least it does with me in The Passenger with Jack Nicholson. The last shot is 360 degrees uncut. I like it.

Do you have anything coming up that you’re excited about?

Excited? [Laughs.]

[Laughs.] Do you have anything coming up that you are excited about or not excited about?

My book [A-Z Life Coaching] will come out in two weeks. The book’s cover designer is the designer of the poster from The Lobster, the movie. I met him once and I found his email and he agreed to do it, so it’s really cool. I like it; he invented it.

Also there will be this theater thing we are going to do. We’re going to shoot one part with Colby Keller, who’s a gay porn star, and we are going to show it in the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam in November. I don’t know if I’m excited about this, or I’m afraid. Woah, yeah, I’m not excited yet.

Get your Keren Cytter Free Download Here

https://daata-editions.com/art/video/terrorist-of-love

Jane Bustin – Rehearsal review in Saturation Point

In Copperfield, Jane Bustin, Laurence Noga, London, Nijinsky, Saturation Point, Uncategorized on 13/05/2016 at 12:25 pm

Jane Bustin: Rehearsal at Copperfield Gallery, London

16 March – 20 May 2016

A review by Laurence Noga

http://www.saturationpoint.org.uk/

“The systems approach is compatible with the evidence that human decisions are largely based on an intuitive feeling of rightness – Rechtsgefuhl – but seeks to validate this subjective feeling by a massive information input, which stands in true correspondence with reality before being refracted through the unconscious.” Jeffrey Steele (Systems, Arts Council 1972-3)

Jane Bustin’s material approaches allow an open system, without a hierarchy. They include: fresco techniques; oil-washed aluminium; acrylic panel painting with ceramic glazes; mirrored copper with latex; polyurethane; wood; copper; silk; paper; gesso; ceramics and ready-made objects

Together, the artist’s relaxed sense of geometry evident in her idiosyncratic solo exhibition, Rehearsal, at the Copperfield Gallery, her sense of rhythm, and her distinctive handling of material through assembly and editing, effect a powerful coercion on her audience.

Bustin works with a highly fragile phenomenology in her expanded approach to painting. This sense of ‘memorial’ is interwoven with techniques that are always meaningful, and which bring together a systematic emphasis on materiality with an intuitive proportional balance. Like Donald Judd, Bustin uses pairs as a single work. She is prepared to generate, or test, arbitrary oppositions in her approach to symmetry and asymmetry, combined with her technical virtuosity in surface facture. With Bustin the relationship between the artist and the object is always equal.

Jane Bustin: Faun, acrylic, polyurethane, copper pins, balsa wood, 50cm x 100cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

The influence of the Russian ballet star Vaslav Nijinsky (1890 – 1950) underpins her decisions here, as a dancer who exceeded the limits of traditional ballet. But this is a show with a more personal edge, not only because works like Faun (2015) are hung at the same height as Bustin’s son, who is also a dancer, but through her ongoing correspondence with the painter Jeffrey Steele. That conversation, in its lucidity and recognition of significant concrete events, combined with an understanding of the intimacy of human relationships (expressed in writers like Proust) casts a spell over the exhibition.

Jane Bustin: Spectre, acrylic, oil, wood, aluminium, 30cm x 35cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

Research, collaboration, and correspondence all seem to have equal weight in Bustin’s vivid shorthand of privacy and illusion. In her work Spectre (2015), Bustin’s line of enquiry synchronises the different surface qualities. She uses two adjoining panels to register an apparition with unequal time value. The painting’s assembly and colour decisions disturb that passage of time, allowing the colour, and its spatial depth, to register in the viewer’s subconscious. The side of this work interacts with the spectator, flickering enough colour peripherally to be visible as you view the front of the work. This phosphorescence attracts your curiosity, makes you look at the sides with equal scrutiny. The small deep red rectangle at the bottom corner of the Prussian/Ultramarine blue panel has an intense registration, played off the frontal white rectangle.

The manipulation of this structure calls to mind the relief constructions of Victor Pasmore, where the painted wood and plastic (e.g. Relief Construction in White, Black and Indian Red, 1961) is handled in an instinctive manner. I get right down underneath this picture to investigate the stained surface of the red /silver panel, but it’s the light green/red lines painted down its side, with a minute red rectangle at its base, which creates that relationship between form and substance.

Jane Bustin, Nijinsky’s Window, oil, acrylic, aluminium, porcelain, oxides, 30cm x 28cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

In one of Bustin’s conversations with Steele in 2014 they talked specifically about Proust’s Remembrance of Things Past. That sense of insight feels embedded into Bustin’s operations and assemblage. Nijinsky’s Window (2015), 30 x 28 cm, oil, acrylic, aluminium, porcelain, oxides, has a bodily emphasis in the handling of the surface facture, but the power and strength of the dancer feels unbalanced, perhaps alluding to Nijinsky’s social awkwardness. The thin, slightly inflated porcelain ceramic feels torn and dysfunctional, hinting at Nijinsky’s fragile mental health just after the First World War. The in-between space has the most concentrated red/gold oxide colour which filters out into the continuous undulating surface, echoing Morris Louis’ veiled paintings such as Mem (1959), allowing the same sense of diffusion and enveloping of the viewer in the same moment.

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Jane Bustin, Rehearsal II, copper, acrylic, oxides, cloth, 80cm x 50cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

Rehearsal II (2015) is strategically persistent in its placement; the mirrored copper surface nags at our self-consciousness. This encounter catches the viewer off guard, stretching the neck adjusting their position. Nijinsky, in his score for L’Après-midi d’un faune, talks about this inclination of the head, a slight forward tilt. With Bustin we get the history (Robert Morris or Judd a reflection of polished metal) but we also experience the exhibition space or the rehearsal space. The cloths hung next to the work further extend the colour source. They pick up on the opaque colour used in tonal shifts on the side of the work. The cloths themselves are important to a more philosophical sense of system.

Jane Bustin, Nijinsky I, overall, acrylic, thule, polyurethane, wood, 28cm x 44cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

In the symmetrical work Nijinsky I , (2015) the use of opacity and transparency introduces real and virtual depth, with an internal compositional relationship. The work is sensual, psychologically charged. Bustin states that the materials include ‘thule’; this is a term used in medieval geography to denote an unknown place, beyond the borders of the known world. The light and its illusionism connect to a feeling of unreality. You start to notice the small white ceramic cloth, its connotations shifting the balance of the show, reminding me of the work of Joseph Beuys with his interest in different substances, and how they could be explored through spirituality and ecstasy.

Jane Bustin, Rose, Copper, oil acrylic, polyurethane. 30cm x 42cm, 2016. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

Rose (2015) draws our attention further towards the problems of construction. This work seems to have the greatest sense of a machine aesthetic. By this I mean that it impacts on the viewer through a sense of co-existence. Its visual power echoes both the machinery of the dancer, and the industrial impulse that drives the language of precision.

Nijinsky, like Steele, was a revolutionary. His use of symmetry and ‘sensual expression’ questioned the role of choreography, to the point where he became paranoid, even frightened of the other dancers in his company. Bustin explores this sense of vulnerability and subversive attitude by making her works objects of desire. Through a kind of dematerialisation, she invites recognition of the perceptual/ psychological/physical. The whole installation adds this extra dimension through a sensation of sound and movement. Its undulation and acceleration is dependent not only on the notion of sequence, but in its very intimate exploration of symmetry and resonance.

The strength of the show is its ability to engage us in a series of relationships which push the viewer towards a systematic/ syntagmatic order. That system has an elaborate complexity in which the conversation between language, literature, linguistics and logic combine. There is an inherent chain of reaction, which unwraps, for the spectator, a dialogue between concept and object. This multi-layered synthesis of art and life is backed up by Bustin’s understanding of a semiological approach, in which she is able simultaneously to induce a memorable sensation with a combination of generative and emotional processes in the real space.


The exhibition runs weekly, Wednesday – Saturday, 12 – 6pm until 20 May, 2016

©Copyright Patrick Morrissey and Clive Hancock.  All rights reserved.

The London Open 2015 – a FAD Q&A with Jane Bustin.

In abstract, Art, Artist, FAD, Gallery, Jane Bustin, London Open, LondonOpen2015, Magazine, Minimal, painting, Whitechapel on 21/07/2015 at 12:34 pm
photo 3

Tabitha’s Cape 2014 by Jane Bustin

The London Open 2015 Q&A with artist Jane Bustin. A FAD Magazine Interview

The London Open Whitechapel Gallery’s triennial exhibition has just opened. 48 of the most dynamic and exciting artists have been chosen from an entry of over 2100 and this online interview comes from FAD Magazine …

1. Have you always felt yourself an artist?
Probably after the first week of art school when I realised you could actually just paint all day.

2. Can you tell us more about your work and what are the main ideas you would like to express?
I make abstract formal compositions reflecting on modernism and materiality. & I take influences from 14th century frescos, 15th century Dutch painting, iconography, modernist architecture and design, French modernist literature, dance, fabrics, books, hardware stores, Japanese ceramics, neon signs, cosmetics, sweet wrappers …

My main interest is to create a resonance within the work that goes beyond its material properties.

3. How do you start the process of making work?
The start of the work is always through the choice of materials.

4. Do you consider the viewer, when making your work?
Always and never, since I am primarily the viewer.

5. Name 3 artists that have inspired your work.
Masaccio

Vermeer

Rothko

6. What defines something as a work of art?
When you need to look again and again and something stirs in the pit of your stomach.

7. How was it finding out you had been chosen as part of The London Open?
Satisfying

8. How have you found working with the Whitechapel Gallery on the exhibition?
The curators and assistants have been superb, I have never before as an Artist in a large open exhibition felt so considered, involved and appreciated.

9. What plans do you have to continue to pursue your art career in 2015?
I am looking forward to exhibiting in November at the Ingleby Gallery, Edinburgh in a show ‘Resistance and Persistence’ based on an essay by Sean Scully on Giorgio Morandi, including works from both artists.

10. Final Question – if you had £49,000 to buy art who would you invest it in?
Women Artists over the age of 49!

www.janebustin.com

Get more details on The London Open: HERE

Whitechapel Gallery

77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Tube: Aldgate East 

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/

T +44 (0)20 7522 7888 

E info@whitechapelgallery.org

Twitter 

Facebook 

The London Open 2015

Galleries 1, 8 & 9

Mon: Closed

Tues, Weds, Fri, Sat, Sun: 11am–6pm

Thurs: 11am–9pm

Rachel Maclean – Let It Go – Inverness Museum and Art Gallery – July 2015

In Daata, Daata Editions, Gallery, Inverness, Museum, Rachel Maclean, scotland on 06/07/2015 at 12:10 pm

Rachel Maclean poster

Rachel Maclean

Let It Go !

Inverness Museum & Art Gallery

11 July – 22 August 2015

Rachel Maclean‘s works for Daata Editions collectively titled Let It Go ! will form part of the artist’s solo show at Inverness Museum & Art Gallery, UK.

Using green screen technology, Rachel Maclean constructs fantasy narratives set in computer-generated landscapes. Maclean plays each of the characters in her films donning outlandish self-made costumes and thick make-up. Comprised of six videos, Let it Go, explores themes of class, aspiration and childhood as 6 wide-eyed pauper characters mime to dialogue sourced from YouTube. These segments are spliced together with passionate confessions of hunger, rage, suffering and insecurity.

More information: highlifehighland.com

Rachel Maclean limited editions available at http://daata-editions.com

The Poetics of Unforgetting, Jumana Manna, Mickalene Thomas, Susanna Wallin

In Art, Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, CRG Gallery, David Gryn, FAZ, Hackney Picturehouse, Jumana Manna, Lehmann Maupin, London, Mickalene Thomas, Susanna Wallin on 29/04/2013 at 9:25 am
Mickalene Thomas: Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman: A Portrait of My Mother (still)

Mickalene Thomas: Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman: A Portrait of My Mother (still)

Artprojx presents
Jumana Manna, Mickalene Thomas, Susanna Wallin
The Poetics of Unforgetting
Introduced by David Gryn, Artprojx

Hackney Picturehouse, 270 Mare Street, London E8 1HE
Thursday 6th June 2013
7-8.30pm

Jumana Manna Pink Foam copy
Jumana Manna
Blessed Blessed Oblivion

Mickalene Thomas: Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman: A Portrait of My Mother

Mickalene Thomas: Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman: A Portrait of My Mother

Mickalene Thomas
Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman: A Portrait of My Mother

Susanna Wallin: Echo Park (still)

Susanna Wallin: Echo Park (still)

Susanna Wallin
Marker
Echo Park


Artprojx Presents at Hackney Picturehouse is a new series of monthly screenings of artists film and video works. Launching with films by three brilliant young international contemporary artists – whose films will linger in your memory long after viewing.
Tickets: Call 0871 902 5734 or visit Hackney Picturehouse website
www.picturehouses.co.uk
www.artprojx.com
https://davidgryn.wordpress.com

Twitter @Artprojx @HackneyPH @ArtprojxCinema

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All three artists have made films, that I have not been able to forget ever since first viewing them. Manna’s Blessed Blessed Oblivion (along with Wallin’s Echo Park) was screened at the Art Video section I selected for Art Basel in Miami Beach 2012 and it was one of the most memorable and complete films I have shown. Susanna Wallin’s film Marker I screened at the Prince Charles Cinema, London several years ago in association with Film London, and somehow it has never left my thoughts and then Mickalene Thomas, whose work I have not screened before this. Last year, I was sent Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman, by her producer, Tanya Selvaratnam and by her gallery Lehmann Maupin in NY, I was deeply moved and I wanted to find a way that I could present it. So here we go.

Blessed Blessed Oblivion by Jumana Manna

Inspired by Kenneth Anger’s Scorpio Rising (1963), BLESSED BLESSED OBLIVION weaves together a portrait of male thug culture in East Jerusalem, manifested in barbershops, auto shops and bodybuilding. At the same time psychologizing and seduced by her subject, the artist finds herself in a double bind, a dilemma that resonates with the muddled desire that animates her protagonist as he drifts from abject rants to declamations of heroic poetry or unashamed self-praise.

Jumana Manna (born in New Jersey, lives and works in Jerusalem and Berlin) uses primarily film/video and sculpture to explore historical narratives, nationalism and subcultural communities. Her films are attempts at weaving together portraits of morally dubious characters or events, and her sculptural practice employs a language of minimalism and abstraction to reformulate familiar objects into a state of ambiguity, navigating between negation and seduction. Jumana Manna is represented by CRG Gallery, New York.

Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman by Mickalene Thomas

Internationally acclaimed artist Mickalene Thomas presented her first documentary film “HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO A BEAUTIFUL WOMAN” during her solo exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum in Fall 2012. The film is a celebration of Thomas’s mother and muse, Sandra Bush, who has been the subject of numerous photographs and paintings by the artist. “HAPPY BIRTHDAY” explores Sandra’s memories and dreams, her life experiences, including her personal struggles and recent illness, and her hopes for the present and future. Her interviews are filled with poignancy, and old photographs and recordings of Sandra singing with her family add texture to this intimate portrait of “Mama Bush.”

Mickalene Thomas was born in Camden, New Jersey in 1971. She earned her MFA from Yale University and holds a BFA from Pratt Institute. In 2002-2003, she participated in the Artist-in-Residence program at the Studio Museum in Harlem, and most recently, was a resident at the Versailles Foundation Munn Artists Program in Giverny, France (2011).

Marker & Echo Park by Susanna Wallin

Marker: One thousand reindeer are left running wild in the northern woods of Sweden. They once belonged to Anna-Sara’s dad. In an act to take care of what has been in order for something new to be able to start, she goes out to find them. Set on the periphery of a Sami community, in the middle of the night, the film follows Anna-Sara on her journey towards Reindeer Dell in Kraja. Marker is an impressionistic narrative on loss and imagination: a calling for someone who is gone, in an act to continue where something stopped. Characters are situated between real scenarios and invented ones, past and present. Funded by Arts Council England with the support of Film London’s Artists Moving Image Network.

Echo Park: Set inside a theme park, the film combines several amusement rides into one audio visual experience of time. Funded by FLAMIN London, The Arts Council England and Channel 4. Set inside an amusement park, entertainment is explored in an attempt to shut out thought.

Susanna Wallin’s work often lends from fact and fiction at once, merging actual scenarios with fictive ones in new narratives on screen. Ritual, dream and a distrust in language are some of her recurring themes. She has been the recipient of a number of commissions and awards, including London Artists Film and Video Award, The Jury Price at Clermont Ferrand and commissions from UK Film Council, Channel 4 and Arts Council England. Originally from Sweden, she lives and works in London and New York.

See FAZ http://www.faz.net/

David Gryn / Artprojx overview

Artprojx, founded and directed by David Gryn, screens, curates, selects and promotes artists’ moving image and other projects, working with leading contemporary art galleries, art fairs, institutes and artists worldwide. Artprojx is a renowned and trusted brand in the artworld, a pop-up gallery space, pop up cinema, a special events team, arts fundraising, marketing, strategy and planning organisation.

Artprojx clients/partners include Art Basel in Miami Beach, MOCAtv, Royal College of Psychiatrists, 3d in Vebier, Hackney Picturehouse, Gagosian, White Cube, Camden Arts Centre, Lisson Gallery, Whitney Museum NY, Tate Britain, ICA, Frieze Art Fair, The Armory Show NY and Hamburg Short Film Festival. Artists screening events have included Christian Marclay, Dara Friedman, Santiago Sierra, Mark Wallinger, Susan Hiller, Christian Jankowski, Jumana Manna, Rashaad Newsome, Tracey Emin,  Dexter Dalwood, Jeremy Deller, Wilhelm Sasnal, Grace Ndiritu, Luke Fowler and many more.

http://www.artprojx.com

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