David Gryn blog

Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

Jane Bustin, Fühler at Leslie, Berlin 22 June

In Art, Berlin, Ceramics, Copper, Copperfield, Gallery, Jane Bustin, Leslie, Paintings, Poppy Bowers, Uncategorized, Whitworth on 18/06/2017 at 11:41 am
3D work by Jane Bustin

Rehearsal II, copper, acrylic, oxides, cloth
80cm x 50 cm overall, Jane Bustin, 2015

Jane Bustin

Fühler

Opening: 22.6.17, 6 pm
Exhibition: 23.6.17 – 20.7.17

Leslie

Bergfriedstraße 20
10969 Berlin

http://lesliegallery.de/

Since the 18th century, European philosophers have distinguished our capacity to feel subjectively from our ability to think rationally. We are sentient beings. As the late neurologist and author Oliver Sacks claimed, ‘perception is never purely in the present – it has to be drawn on experience of the past’. Jane Bustin’s exhibition Fühler, to have feelers or sensors about a given subject, calls on this capacity.

Bustin’s approach to painting foregrounds a conscious experience of material surface and texture. Although abstract, her works are evocations of people and histories. They are grounded in a range of intellectual sources, primarily European modernist poetry, design and literature as well as theology and philosophy. Such concepts are given physical expression through her intuitive arrangements of materials. Oil, dyed silk, porcelain, woven cloth, polished copper, tulle and ceramic glazes are just some of the media used to give shape and feeling to philosophical ideas. Born out of the tactile, her works are Fühler; they are imbued with a sensory memory and resonate with emotion.

Four works in the show, Apres II, Nijinsky I, Nijinksy’s Windows and Rehearsal II, pay tribute to the radical Russian ballet dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinksy (1890-1950). Rising to prominence as part of the belle epoch, Nijinksy combined depth and intensity of expression with symmetry to pioneer new stylistic ideas in modern dance, echoed in the compositional balance of Bustin’s three textural diptychs.

In Après II textile becomes a stand-in for the body and the memory of its physical activity. It takes its cue from Nijinsky’s choreography of the ballet L’apres midi d’un Faun in 1912, where the movement of fabric is used as a metaphor for sexual desire and physical exhaustion. Like most of Bustin’s works the scale is of human proportions. Hung quite low, Apres II sits on the wall around the height of the artist’s heart.

Elsewhere, earlier works in the exhibition include Christina the Astonishing, part of a series referencing the iconography of female saints and Tablet I, Tablet III and Tablet IV, evoking archaic forms of communication. Combining sheets of paper from both old and new notebooks, they prompt memories of the past alongside thoughts of the future.

Refusing to be filmed during his lifetime, Nijinsky strongly believed his performances should only be experienced live. Likewise Bustin prefers her works to be encountered in real time under the honest inconsistency of natural light. Like the tip of antennae, one’s eyes should roam over surface, roll over folds, shift focus through diaphanous layers and peer into copper reflections. Her works call upon an understanding of Fühler and our capacity to feel as sentient beings. They ask us to look again.

Text by Poppy Bowers, Curator, Whitworth Gallery, Manchester

Exhibited works

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Daata x Vanity present Saya Woolfalk

In Art, Art Fair, Artist, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Digital, digital art, Frieze, Frieze Art Fair, Leslie Tonkonow, Miami, New York, Rita Pinto, Saya Woolfalk, Uncategorized, Vanity Projects, Video on 30/04/2017 at 7:25 am

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Daata Editions x Vanity Projects – featuring Saya Woolfalk

Colour Mixing Machine

On view in both Vanity NYC and Miami venues April 15 – May 9

Vanity Projects, 99 Chrystie St 2F, New York, NY, 10002 +16464102928

www.vanityprojectsnyc.com/ & https://daata-editions.com/

Saya Woolfalk is a New York based artist who uses science fiction and fantasy to re-imagine the world in multiple dimensions. With the multi-year projects No Place, The Empathics and ChimaTEK, Woolfalk has created the world of the Empathics, a fictional race of women who are able to alter their genetic make-up and fuse with plants. With each body of work, Woolfalk continues to build the narrative of these women’s lives, and questions the utopian possibilities of cultural hybridity. The Pollen Catchers is a continuation of ChimaTEK, in which the Empathics employ color-mixing machines to further shape shift their morphology. Sound attribution to The Hathaway Family Plot. https://daata-editions.com/artists/saya-woolfalk

“2017 promises to be an exciting year for Vanity Projects, which is partnering with Daata Editions, the British-based online art platform equally dedicated to outside-the-box experimentation. This initiative will bring a wealth of talent to both the Miami and New York venues, starting with Scott Reeder, followed by Saya Woolfalk, Ed Fornieles, Yung Jake, Jacky Connolly, Jillian Mayer, Jeremy Couillard, Rashaad Newsome and others. “A Goth Life,” a group show opening in June, cheekily brings together video that honors “our joyously soulless, self-reflective, insular, tension and angst ridden times,” just in time for the sunny summer. Key activations with art institutions will expand the project’s reach, with plans for potential events during Art Basel Miami Beach.” Text by Scott Indrisek

Vanity Projects in collaboration with Daata Editions welcomes Frieze, Vanity and Daata guests, Friday May 5, 10am-12pm for a screening of Saya Woolfalk’s work Color Mixing Machine 1-6, and complimentary nail polish manicures inspired by the artist & join Rita Pinto, David Gryn and Saya Woolfalk for drinks from 6-8pm. RSVP: contact@vanityprojectsnyc.com

Saya Woolfalk: ChimaCloud and the Pose System at Leslie Tonkonow. New works by the artist are on view through May 6th in Saya Woolfalk: ChimaCloud and the Pose System at Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, 535 West 22nd Street, New York, NY. www.tonkonow.com

Artist Features at Film Cologne curated by Daata Editions

In A Goth Life, Art, Art Cologne, Art Fair, artcologne, Artist, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Film Cologne, Germany, Uncategorized, Virtual Reality on 05/04/2017 at 10:04 pm
Hudson Valley Ruins still 1

Jacky Connolly, Hudson Valley Ruins, 2015

For Art Cologne’s Film Cologne, Daata Editions has selected feature video artworks from artists on the platform including: Sue de Beer, David Blandy/Larry Achiampong, Jacky Connolly, Matt Copson, Keren Cytter, Casey Jane Ellison, Leo Gabin, Rachel Maclean, Jillian Mayer & Lucas Leyva, Takeshi Murata & Robert Beatty, Hannah Perry, Scott Reeder, John Skoog, Chloe Wise, Zadie Xa.

A Goth Life, the specially compiled curated programme of artists and their video & sound artworks selected from Daata Editions including: Larry Achiampong, Thora Dolven Balke, David Blandy, Jake Chapman, Jacky Connolly, Keren Cytter, Casey Jane Ellison, Tracey Emin, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Yung Jake, Rachel Maclean, Jillian Mayer, Takeshi Murata, Rashaad Newsome, Tameka Norris, Hannah Perry, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Scott Reeder, Jacolby Satterwhite, Zadie Xa.

Daata Editions will also feature NAUSEA – A VR Exhibition by Metaphysics featuring artists: Eddie Peake, Florian Meisenberg, Anne de Vries, Rubén Grilo, Jack Strange and Anna K.E. www.metaphysicsvr.com

Art Cologne’s Film Cologne curated by Daata Editions – Schedule (features in bold)

Tuesday, 25 April
12:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. A Goth Life & NAUSEA
Wednesday, 26 April
11:00 a.m. – 13:00 p.m. A Goth Life & NAUSEA
13:00 p.m. Sue de Beer, Ghosts, 2011
13:30 p.m. – 15:30 p.m. A Goth Life & NAUSEA
15:30 p.m. David Blandy/Larry Achiampong, Terra-Biters – Mix Tape, 2017 
16:20 p.m. – 18:30 p.m. A Goth Life & NAUSEA
18:30 p.m. – 19:00 p.m. Jacky Connolly, Hudson Valley Ruins, 2016
Thursday, 27 April
11:00 a.m. – 13:00 p.m. A Goth Life
13:00 p.m. – a double bill
Matt Copson, Sob Story, 2016 & Keren Cytter, Metamorphosis, 2015 
13:30 p.m. – 15:20 p.m. A Goth Life
15:20 p.m. – 16:00 p.m. Casey Jane Ellison, UR$, 2016
16:00 p.m. -18:25 p.m. A Goth Life
18:25 p.m. – 19:00 p.m. Leo Gabin, EXIT/ENTRY, 2016
Friday, 28 April
11:00 a.m. – 13:00 p.m. A Goth Life
13:00 p.m. – 14:00 p.m. Rachel Maclean, Feed Me, 2015
14:00 p.m. – 15:00 p.m. A Goth Life
15:00 p.m. – 15:45 p.m. a triple bill
Jillian Mayer & Lucas Leyva, Life and Freaky Times of Uncle Luke, 2012
& Takeshi Murata, OM Rider 2013-14
& Hannah Perry, CRYDAGGERS, 2016

15:45 p.m. – 15:45-p.m. A Goth Life
17:30 p.m. – 19:00 p.m. Scott Reeder, Moon Dust, 2015 
Saturday, 29 April
11:00 a.m. -13:00 p.m. A Goth Life
13:00 p.m. – 13:20 p.m. John Skoog, Nosferatu, 2017 
13:20 p.m. – 15:15 p.m. A Goth Life
15:15 p.m. 15:30 p.m. Chloe Wise, Feral, 2016
15:30 p.m. – 17:40 p.m. A Goth Life
17:40 p.m. – 18:00 p.m. Zadie Xa, Mood Rings, Crystals and Opal Coloured Stones, 2016 

See the full schedule here in the Art Cologne Press Release

Image: Jacky Connolly, Hudson Valley Ruins, 2015 (courtesy the artist)

Daata Editions at Art Los Angeles Contemporary 2017

In ALAC, Art, Art Los Angeles Contemporary, Artprojx, Barker Hangar, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Jillian Mayer, Scott Reeder, Uncategorized, USA, Yung Jake on 22/01/2017 at 5:34 pm

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Daata Editions at ALAC 2017

Yung Jake, Jillian Mayer, Scott Reeder.

New artworks released on Daata from Thursday, January 26, 2017 

This is the latest release of dedicated artist projects from the Daata Editions Season Two commissioning cycle, featuring Yung Jake, Jillian Mayer and Scott Reeder.

In the Art Los Angeles Contemporary Reading Room, Daata will screen a selection of these new artists works and other artworks from the Daata Editions catalogue, along with a special screening, reception and introduction by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions, in the ALAC Auditorium on Sunday, January 29 at 11.30am. All works are visible and available to acquire online at http://daata-editions.com

Daata Editions commissioned artists: Larry Achiampong, Sofie Alsbo, Ilit Azoulay, Thora Dolven Balke, Helen Benigson, David Blandy, Phoebe Boswell, Jake Chapman, Jacky Connolly, Matt Copson, Keren Cytter, Graham Dolphin, Anaïs Duplan, Melanie Eckersley, Casey Jane Ellison, Tracey Emin, Laura Focarazzo, Hannah Ford, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Yung Jake, Kate Jessop, Jasmine Johnson, Daniel Keller & Martti Kalliala, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, Lina Lapelyte, Sara Ludy, Scott Lyman, Rachel Maclean, Michael Manning, Scott Mason, Jillian Mayer, Florian Meisenberg, C.O. Moed, Jonathan Monaghan, Takeshi Murata, Rashaad Newsome, Camille Norment, Tameka Norris, Hannah Perry, Elise Peterson, Quayola, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Jon Rafman, Scott Reeder, Ariana Reines, Charles Richardson, Jacolby Satterwhite, Julian Scordato, John Skoog, Daniel Swan, Abri de Swardt, Katie Torn, Amalia Ulman, Artie Vierkant, Stephen Vitiello, Susanne Wiegner, Chloe Wise, Saya Woolfalk, Zadie Xa, Antoinette Zwirchmayr.

Daata Editions commissions artist video, sound, poetry and web. This new, logical and innovative way to collect art is designed as a native platform to a new generation of artists who work with moving image and sound. Limited edition artworks can be viewed and acquired as digital downloads. Sign up at https://daata-editions.com/

Art Los Angeles Contemporary

The Barker Hangar 

3021 Airport Ave 

Santa Monica, CA 90405 

January 26 – 29, 2017 

Opening Night 

Thursday, January 26, 2017 

7pm–9pm

Hours 

Friday, January 27: 11am–7pm 

Saturday, January 28: 11am–7pm 

Sunday, January 29: 11am–6pm 

Image: Bands by Scott Reeder, 2016 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Film and Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2016 – Program

In ABMB, Art, Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Fair, artists, Artprojx, Best Dressed Chicken in Town, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Film, Film and Video, Film Library, Miami, Miami Beach, New World Center, New World Symphony, SoundScape Park, Uncategorized on 23/11/2016 at 10:18 am

 

abmb-2016

abmb16_film_final

Film & Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2016. 

Curated by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions. 

Nov 30 – Dec 3. 

Soundscape Park, New World Symphony Center, Miami Beach.

Details:

Weds Nov 30

6pm

Surround Sound artworks in SoundScape Park. A compilation of sound works by Ain Bailey, Zoë Buckman, A.K. Burns, Jonathan Montague, Molly Palmer (supported by The Fountainhead Residency) and Susannah Stark. Soundcloud info

8pm

Best Dressed Chicken in Town – a compilation of artworks. 

Tromarama, Psylocibin, 2010, 51ʺ; Edouard Malingue.
Ana Mendieta, Anima, Silueta de Cohetes (Firework Piece), 1976, 2ʹ23ʺ; Lelong
Anri Sala, Mixed Behaviour, 2003, 8ʹ19ʺ; Hauser & Wirth.
Derrick Adams with Ramon Silva, My Jesus Piece, 2014, 2ʹ38ʺ; Rhona Hoffman.
Samson Young, The Coffee Cantata (Institute of Fictional Ethnomusicology), 2015, 6ʹ06ʺ; Edouard Malingue.
Kudzanai Chiurai, Moyo, 2013, 5ʹ33ʺ; Goodman Gallery.
Edgardo Aragón, La encomienda, Perú, 2013, 4ʹ45ʺ; mor charpentier.
Luther Price, Singing Biscuits, 2006, 4ʹ; Callicoon.
Catharina van Eetvelde (with music by To Rococo Rot), Glu, 2007, 2ʹ28ʺ; Greta Meert.
Ara Peterson, Alsatian Darn, 2011, 4ʹ17ʺ; Ratio 3.
Matt Copson, Sob Story, 2016, 5ʹ; High Art.
Martin Creed, Work No. 2656 Understanding, 2016, 3ʹ11ʺ; Hauser & Wirth.
Jillian Mayer, I am Your Grandma, 2011, 1ʹ3ʺ; David Castillo.
Kovásznai György, Memory of the Summer of ‘74, 1974, 9ʹ15ʺ.
Tromarama, Serigala Militia, 2006, 4ʹ22ʺ; Edouard Malingue.
Kim Gordon, Proposal for a Dance, 2012, 12ʹ; 303 Gallery.
Li Shurui and Li Daiguo, The Shelter: All Fears Come from the Unknown Shimmering at the Edge of the World, 2012/2016, 3ʹ09ʺ; White Space Beijing.
Adam Shecter, Study for Satellites 4 (Train), 2016, 1ʹ52ʺ; 11R.
Brian Alfred, Chromacity, 2016, 4ʹ17ʺ; Ameringer McEnery Yohe.
Dashiell Manley, It and another other, 2015, 3ʹ33ʺ; Jessica Silverman.
Haroon Mirza, Adhãn, 2009, 4ʹ54ʺ; Lisson.
Zak Ové, A Land So Far, 2016, 6ʹ30ʺ; Vigo.
Cabelo, Itamambuca Dub, 2014, 4ʹ; Marilia Razuk.
Lena Daly, Trix, 2016, 5ʹ; Various Small Fires.
Nate Boyce, Repossesion Seqeunce II, 2016, 4ʹ30ʺ; Altman Siegel.
Tomislav Gotovac, Ella, 1966, 3ʹ25ʺ; Gregor Podnar.
Rodney Graham, A Little Thought, 2000, 3ʹ54ʺ; Hauser & Wirth.
Keren Cytter, Terrorist of Love, 2016, 3ʹ9ʺ; Nagel Draxler (A Free Downloadable Artwork commissioned by Daata Editions & Artspace)

10pm

Double Bill: Rita Ackermann and Christian Marclay

Rita Ackermann, Movement as Monument, 2011, 22ʹ30ʺ; Hauser & Wirth
Christian Marclay, Mixed Reviews (American Sign Language), 1999/2001, 30ʹ; Paula Cooper

Thurs Dec 1

6pm

Surround Sound artworks in SoundScape Park. A compilation of sound works by Ain Bailey, Zoë Buckman, A.K. Burns, Jonathan Montague, Molly Palmer (supported by The Fountainhead Residency) and Susannah Stark. Soundcloud info

8pm

Best Dressed Chicken in Town. A compilation of artworks by Ana Mendieta, Anri Sala, Derrick Adams with Ramon Silvera, Samson Young, Kudzanai Chiurai, Edgardo Aragón, Luther Price, Catharina van Eetvelde, Ara Peterson, Matt Copson, Martin Creed, Jillian Mayer, György Kovásznai, Tromarama, Kim Gordon, Li Shurui & Li Daiguo, Adam Shecter, Brian Alfred, Dashiell Manley, Haroon Mirza, Zak Ové, Cabelo, Lena Daly, Nate Boyce, Tomislav Gotovac, Rodney Graham, Keren Cytter.

10pm

New Parthenon: works by artists: Rashid Johnson, Ain Bailey/Sonia Boyce, Anna Grenman, Alex Prager, Penny Siopis.

Rashid Johnson, The New Black Yoga, 2011, 10ʹ57ʺ; Hauser & Wirth.
Ain Bailey, Sonia Boyce, Oh Adelaide, 7ʹ10ʺ.
Anna Grenman, Irminsul, 2016, 5ʹ.
Alex Prager, La Grande Sortie, 2015, 10ʹ; Lehmann Maupin.
Penny Siopis, The New Parthenon, 2016, 15ʹ26ʺ; Stevenson.

Fri Dec 2 

6pm

Surround Sound artworks in SoundScape Park. A compilation of sound works by Ain Bailey, Zoë Buckman, A.K. Burns, Jonathan Montague, Molly Palmer (supported by The Fountainhead Residency) and Susannah Stark. Soundcloud info

8pm

Best Dressed Chicken in Town. A compilation of artworks by Ana Mendieta, Anri Sala, Derrick Adams with Ramon Silvera, Samson Young, Kudzanai Chiurai, Edgardo Aragón, Luther Price, Catharina van Eetvelde, Ara Peterson, Matt Copson, Martin Creed, Jillian Mayer, György Kovásznai, Tromarama, Kim Gordon, Li Shurui & Li Daiguo, Adam Shecter, Brian Alfred, Dashiell Manley, Haroon Mirza, Zak Ové, Cabelo, Lena Daly, Nate Boyce, Tomislav Gotovac, Rodney Graham, Keren Cytter.

10pm

Double Bill: Liliana Porter and Alfredo Jaar

Alfredo Jaar, Muxima, 2005, 36ʹ; Lelong, Goodman Gallery
Liliana Porter, Actualidades/Breaking News, 2016, 22ʹ47ʺ; Sicardi

Sat Dec 3

6pm

Surround Sound artworks in SoundScape Park. A compilation of sound works by Ain Bailey, Zoë Buckman, A.K. Burns, Jonathan Montague, Molly Palmer (supported by The Fountainhead Residency) and Susannah Stark. Soundcloud info

8pm

Best Dressed Chicken in Town. A compilation of artworks by Ana Mendieta, Anri Sala, Derrick Adams with Ramon Silvera, Samson Young, Kudzanai Chiurai, Edgardo Aragón, Luther Price, Catharina van Eetvelde, Ara Peterson, Matt Copson, Martin Creed, Jillian Mayer, György Kovásznai, Tromarama, Kim Gordon, Li Shurui & Li Daiguo, Adam Shecter, Brian Alfred, Dashiell Manley, Haroon Mirza, Zak Ové, Cabelo, Lena Daly, Nate Boyce, Tomislav Gotovac, Rodney Graham, Keren Cytter.

10pm

Love Songs – Four Films by Wilhelm Sasnal

Wilhelm Sasnal, Love Songs, 2005, 10ʹ02ʺ; Anton Kern.
Wilhelm Sasnal, Kiss, 2002–2003, 4ʹ51ʺ; Anton Kern.
Wilhelm Sasnal, Developing Tank, 2015, 14ʹ22ʺ; Anton Kern.
Wilhelm Sasnal, The River, 2005, 23ʹ10ʺ; Anton Kern.

Daily (Nov 30 – Dec 4)

Miami Beach Convention Center Film Library:

In addition to the outdoor program, visitors will be able to individually (touch) screen over 50 works by artists such as Stephen Dean, Edith Dekyndt, Maggie Lee, Gabriel Lester, Shelly Nadashi, Sophie Nys, João Vasco Paiva, Betye Saar, Jason Simon, Su-Mei Tse and Tuo Wang, as well as all the artist listed in the outdoor programs.

The Film Library is next to the Magazine area and opposite the Salon and Conversations auditorium.

Talks:

Tues Nov 29. 11am-12.30pm

Insights at New World Center: The Music in Film & Sound, Art Basel in Miami Beach
Featuring: David Gryn, Kathryn Mikesell, Molly Palmer and John Kieser
New World Center, SunTrust Pavilion. RSVP/Details & Tickets: www.nws.edu/insights

Sun Dec 4. 2-3pm

Artist Talk – Conversations and Salon: Art Basel’s 2016 program in Miami Beach Convention Center, programmed by Mari Spirito. 

The Artist as Composer
Molly Palmer, Artist, London; Susannah Stark, Artist, London; Kathryn Mikesell, Founder, The Fountainhead Residency and Studios, Miami; Rachel Mason, Artist, Los Angeles. Moderator: William J. Simmons, Lecturer in Art History, City College of New York, New York. With an introduction by David Gryn, Curator of Art Basel’s Film sector and Founder of Daata Editions and Artprojx, London. Art Basel Press Release

Some More Links:

Art Basel Miami Beach

New World Symphony 

Time Out Miami

papermag MEGA guide

Art Basel Film Trailer

Fountainhead Residency

Molly Palmer

Daata Editions

 

The Artist as Composer – in Conversations and Salon series: Art Basel in Miami Beach 2016

In Art, Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Basel Miami Beach, Art Salon, Artists Talk, Daata, daataeditions, Miami, Miami Beach, Music, New World Center, New World Symphony, Sound, SoundScape Park, talk, Uncategorized on 16/11/2016 at 5:45 pm
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molly palmer, fountain, 2016

Conversations and Salon: Art Basel’s 2016 program in Miami Beach. Art Basel’s Conversations and Salon series will bring together celebrated artists, galleries, art historians, writers, curators, museum directors and collectors from across the globe, including Alexandre Arrechea, Wafaa Bilal, Francesco Clemente, Mark Dion, Lady Bunny, Julio Le Parc, Glenn Ligon, Tony Matelli, Jill Magid, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Damián Ortega, Bernardo Ortiz, Molly Palmer, Howardena Pindell, HE Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi, Howard Rachofsky and Sun Xun among others.

Sunday, December 4, 2016
2pm to 3pm | Artist Talk | The Artist as Composer
Molly Palmer, Artist, London; Susannah Stark, Artist, London; Kathryn Mikesell, Founder, The Fountainhead Residency and Studios, Miami; Rachel Mason, Artist, Los Angeles. Moderator: William J. Simmons, Lecturer in Art History, City College of New York, New York. With an introduction by David Gryn, Curator of Art Basel’s Film sector and Founder of Daata Editions and Artprojx, London.

The Conversations and Salon talks are programmed by Mari Spirito, Founding Director, Protocinema, Istanbul/New York.

 

info on all the talks art basel press release

notes.

The Art Basel in Miami Beach Film & Sound program in Soundscape Park will be Free to attend on Wednesday, November 30 thru Saturday, December 3. The surround sound program starts at 6pm until 8pm and repeats each of the days, this is a compilation of sound artworks, played nightly during the fair from 6pm until 8pm, featuring artists commissioned to create or reform work into surround sound installations. This year’s artists include: Molly Palmer, Sussanah Stark, Ain Bailey, Zoe Buckman, Jonathan Montague and A.K. Burns.

The Film program starts at 8pm each night with a two hour compilation, repeated daily, of 28 moving image artworks screened under the title ‘Best Dressed Chicken in Town’. Artists include: Ana Mendieta, Anri Sala, Derrick Adams with Ramon Silvera, Samson Young, Kudzanai Chiurai, Edgardo Aragón, Luther Price, Catharina van Eetvelde, Ara Peterson, Matt Copson, Martin Creed, Jillian Mayer, György Kovásznai, Tromarama, Kim Gordon, Li Shurui & Li Daiguo, Adam Shecter, Brian Alfred, Dashiell Manley, Haroon Mirza, Zak Ové, Cabelo, Lena Daly, Nate Boyce, Tomislav Gotovac, Rodney Graham, Keren Cytter.

With a title borrowed from a classic 1970s reggae song by Jamaican dj/singer Doctor Alimantado, this year’s short film program focuses on a selection of international artists who engage with music in a multitude of ways. All the films in this varied and exciting program demonstrate the power of music to attract an audience, keep it engaged, elicit suspense and tug at the heartstrings. Similar to classical symphony works, the order of the films builds up to a crescendo creating an awe-inspiring magic derived from the works in their entirety.

Each night at 10pm there are uniquely featured Film program’s including a Rita Ackermann, Christian Marclay Double Bill on Wednesday, November 30, and a Liliana Porter and Alfredo Jaar Double Bill on the Friday, December 2.

On Thursday, December 1 a feature titled New Parthenon, with works by artists: Ain Bailey & Sonia Boyce, Anna Grenman, Rashid Johnson, Alex Prager, Penny Siopis.

The final screening titled Love Songs is on Saturday, December 3 will include four short films by Polish artist Wilhelm Sasnal.

All the works have a strong relationship with music.

TIME OUT

https://www.timeout.com/miami/things-to-do/art-basel-miami-2016-film

&

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INSIGHTS: THE MUSIC in FILM & SOUND – ART BASEL in MIAMI BEACH
NEW WORLD CENTER

Tuesday, November 29, 11:00 am
New World Center, SunTrust Pavilion
Coffee, tea and light pastries will be served
Free with RSVP/ticket

Featuring David Gryn, Kathryn Mikesell, Molly Palmer and John Kieser

RSVP/Tickets: www.nws.edu/insights

David Gryn, the curator of Art Basel’s Film & Sound programming and Director of Daata Editions in conversation with Kathryn Mikesell, founder of The Fountainhead Residency & Studios, Miami, and Molly Palmer, a London based artist commissioned for the Surround Sound program and will be resident at Fountainhead. Hosted by John Kieser, Executive Vice President and Provost of the New World Symphony.

A conversation around the curation of this years Film and Sound programming for Art Basel in Miami Beach and its relationship to music, the New World Center, collaborations between the various organisations, artists, residencies, curators and future plans and aspirations. There will be a chance to join in the conversations and ask questions.

For more information on the 2016 Art Basel events in SoundScape Park: http://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/art-basel-at-soundscape-park/.

 

Is Online Art The Future ? Aston Martin feature on Daata Editions

In Amalia Ulman, Art, Art Basel, Aston Martin, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, David Hockney, digital art, Elizabeth Dee, Julia Stoschek, Saya Woolfalk, Scott Reeder, Uncategorized, Zuecca Projects on 08/07/2016 at 10:53 am
Aston Martin Daata Editions

Image: Tracey Emin, I Lay Here, 2016 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions

 

Art transcends culture, echoes its roots and is integral
to the documentation of the human experience

For an artwork to reflect the musings of its creators, it should ideally be able to naturally adapt. While a ‘physical’ piece of art may be moved or displaced, its very form cannot. The intellectually satisfying aspect of enjoying a painting for example, will come from discovering (or rediscovering) a detail we have missed or overlooked. A brush stroke or a shaft of sunlight can add new meaning to a well-loved piece, without altering it per sae. Since the dawn of the Internet in the 1980s, artists have exploited the laws of this parallel world to create events, images, or to subvert the way we visually absorb information.
Part of the attraction is its global reach, the use of cutting-edge technology and the liberation of art from the constraints of traditional wealth-creating establishments such as commercial galleries, auction houses, private collectors and public museums. Then there’s how we as viewers actually relate to virtual or digital art and one of the most exciting features of a digital piece of art is that it is ever changing. While we may be familiar with its initial subject, it will surprise us as it moves and transforms, inviting us to engage.

Though digital pieces have found a home in some of the art world’s most heavyweight institutions, many collectors still need convincing.

Enter Daata Editions: an online gallery utterly dedicated to video, sound and web art, launched in May 2015, showcasing artists’ video, sound, web and poetry works, available to view and acquire on the website as digital downloads in limited editions. Featured on Daata Editions is Argentinian-born Spanish Artist Amalia Ulman whose series, ‘White Flag Emojis’, displays short videos that create a powerful feeling of apprehension. Ulman is also known for exploring social media in her work, Excellences and Perfections, a poignant four-month long art project in which she creates a fake persona on her Instagram page with thousands of followers. The thought-provoking series throws up important questions on the pitfalls of easily manufactured online “fame”, while, perhaps ironically, highlighting the power of digital art in doing so.

The founder of Daata Editions, David Gryn, and his team have a strong reputation worldwide for producing, curating and promoting artists’ audio visual projects and events that have consistently excited and attracted large audiences, and introduced new audiences to the arts. Gryn says that digital and downloadable art is the future, a belief confirmed by David Hockney who in 2011 began creating works to be viewed exclusively on an Ipad, thus allowing him broader perspective and freedom of adaptability when working.

Daata Editions artworks form part of the Hammer Museum Contemporary Collection, US; the Julia Stoschek Collection, Germany; KIASMA, Finland and the Zabludowicz Collection, UK. Collectors, including Robert and Renee Drake, The Netherlands, as well as galleries, including Elizabeth Dee, New York and Marc Foxx, Los Angeles, have purchased multiple artworks from the platform.

Things are moving all the time, so watch out for fresh new works Daata Editions will be launching in the next months. Artists will include the likes of Saya Woolfalk, Larry Achiampong, Scott Reeder and Tameka Norris. In addition, Daata Editions in collaboration with Zuecca Projects presents Gentrification, an exhibition with new works by artists Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, at BBAR, Bauer Hotel, Venice, to coincide with the 15th Venice Architecture Biennale.

Loreta Lamargese text on Daata Editions

In Art, Art Basel, Art Fair, Chloe Wise, Daata, Digital, Frieze, Gryn, Hammer, NADA, Online, Rafman, Sound, Stoschek, Video, Zabludowicz on 19/10/2015 at 10:54 am
Chloe Wise, should I add an emoji, 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Chloe Wise, should I add an emoji, 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Loreta Lamargese on Daata Editions

Daata Editions offers a novel platform to solve a longstanding concern: how to commodify, collect, and distribute intangible and already-networked digital artwork. Probing this question reveals a nested paradox: while we’ve become increasingly reliant upon and enthralled by the digital, artworks that employ new media are thought of as being positioned outside the art market. It is becoming more and more difficult to disentangle ourselves from the digital web and artists – like all those included in the three artwork releases from Daata Editions Season One – are using its medial language to engage with their surroundings. At the same time, it is inane to think that we don’t rely heavily on the market – one that has thus far been thought to absorb only singular and static objects – and that the market isn’t a chief harbinger controlling which artworks and artists receive visibility and clout. And yet, many artists who reject a tradition of trading solely in tangible and discrete art objects, who use digitality as both a site that needs mining and as a material to be manipulated, are visible and powerful contenders in the current contemporary art arena.

What makes Daata Editions particularly significant at our present moment is that it fuses the seeming discord between the market and digital material, organizing artists’ video, sound, and web-based work and having that work available online as editions. In fact, Daata makes clear that these two apparently dissonant entities depend on similar structures, relying on a rapid and seamless transition of information; both are, after all, networked and global. The artists presented in Daata Editions are producing works that operate beyond the sanctified walls of galleries and are experimenting with the fungibility of concepts that fit diverse media and operate on these diverse platforms simultaneously. Similarly, while Daata is primarily stationed online, it does not limit itself to the borderless web, involving additional presentations at art fairs such as a recent collaboration with NADA New York.

Now with its third artwork release, it is safe to say the initial hypothesis that launched the platform is true: that when given an intuitive mode to consume and sell digital artwork – when given the opportunity to purchase new media on indigenous soil- collectors would take ownership. Editions by artists such as Amalia Ulman, Chloe Wise, Ed Fornieles, Jon Rafman, and Leo Gabin made available through Daata Editions are now housed in preeminent international collections including the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, The Zabludowicz Collection, London, and The Julia Stoschek Collection in Dusseldorf. And while private collectors and institutions alike fold moving images and sound works into their collections, artists continue to expand the limits of contemporary art practices, renegotiating our reliance on any particular medium or site.

While I’m hesitant to stress the intrinsically utopic qualities of digital art, its malleability with place and material affords it distance from hermeneutic singularity or ontological fixity. The dynamic chain of reformatting that these digital works undergo lends them to active and multifarious meanings and concepts. For example, Chloe Wise’s series created for Daata Editions, Do You Really Think He Fingered Her?, sees the artist subverting the notion of determined and legible identification. In this collection of videos, we find a friend and collaborator of the artist, Robyn Fox, reciting overheard phrases and the Twitter feeds of Art Basel Miami Beach attendees and friends of the artist. Because Fox is costumed in Wise’s clothes and because Wise often uses her own image in her artwork, we are compelled to read Fox as Wise, collapsing barriers of individualization normally fixed to bodies. And why shouldn’t we? If the video itself, as well as the material from social media that Fox recites, proliferates on multiple channels and in different formats at overlapping intervals, then why should identities and meaning be fixed and contained rather than performed and adaptable?

Since its emergence, artists working with video have struggled to monetize their practice while making hefty contributions to the history of art, changing our modes of perceiving and altering our relationship to objects and images. The current generation of young artists working in new media, including those presented in Daata Editions, is widening the net of possibilities under which image creation and circulation can exist. They are entering the conversation at a vital moment, one in which new economic platforms attempt to keep up with them, finding original means to sell and distribute migrant and non-discrete objects. Daata Editions is an early contributor to this new economy, which not only considers but also focuses and exists within the digital realm. Now entering its third artwork release, Daata Editions has tested these murky waters, shedding light on the possibilities of nurturing and distributing artwork that gains dynamism through circulation – through the very media it takes from.

Loreta Lamargese is a curator and researcher based in Montreal, Canada and works at Galerie Division

Galerie Division http://www.galeriedivision.com/montreal/

Daata Editions http://daata-editions.com

Collecting on the Cloud, a digital exchange with David Gryn of Daata by Sylvia Wu, SCREEN

In Art, Art Basel, Daata Editions, Digital, Frieze, SCREEN, Sound, Video, Web, Zabludowicz on 10/10/2015 at 7:55 pm

photo: David Gryn by Jane Bustin

Sylvia Wu’s conversation with David Gryn, director of Daata Editions, On New Models of Selling Digital Art, is now live on SCREEN, a New York-based bilingual platform aiming to redefine media art.

http://www.onscreentoday.com/conversation/art-collecting-in-the-air

With the fall coming up, the relatively quiet holiday season will burst into a kaleidoscope of exhibitions and events. Alongside the physical world, several online sales platforms are also making their voices heard. Daata Editions, created by Art Basel’s Curator of Film, David Gryn, and collector Anita Zabludowicz, is among the most active. Launched in May this year, Daata Editions has made some great sales of its artist commissioned video, sound and web art editions, and perhaps more importantly, it has established a fresh model for selling and buying digital art. On its website, Daata Editions has currently two releases from “Season 1” of artist commissioned works including a collaboration between Martti Kalliala and Daniel Keller, and videos by Takeshi Murata. To figure out more about Daata’s language and concepts, SCREEN was in conversation with David Gryn, who previously said “We need to believe that, in the same way we easily buy music and films online via the likes of iTunes or Amazon, we can buy art via digital files and not have to [physically] possess an object to give a work its validation”1

SCREEN: We know that you curate Art Basel’s film sector where you can observe the market for digital art. But how exactly did the initial idea of creating Daata Editions come to you?

David Gryn: I worked with Art Basel for five years, and before that with various major other art fairs. It was obvious that galleries really don’t think about bringing films, videos, sound and other digital media to art fairs because they haven’t found a way to sell them. It dawned to me that something needs to be done about this, not just by one person but by many. I’ve never been a big believer in the market place per se, but I do believe that you need to have a market place where artists who make good digital artworks can be supported.

So our model of creating Daata Editions is the idea to start commissioning artists, paying them and giving them royalties, marketing the process and what they create, and I came together with these thoughts with collector and philanthropist Anita Zabludowicz, whom I’ve known for a long time. We came from different spectrums of the art world, me working with the art directly and not involved in the market place, while Anita collecting art passionately but also supporting artists and students. She believes in the ecosystem of the art world like I do, and the evolving concept of Daata was something we mutually agreed with.

S: What differs Daata Editions from other online sales platforms?

DG: We are not trying to be different. What we are building is our own bespoke, boutique model. I’m not looking at this being reinventing the wheel, but that we’ve created Daata Editions to present artists who make artworks with digital media, video, web, sound works. It works for that medium as well as we can possibly do within a finite model. Where it may differ from others is that we are very restricted to what we are focused on doing—we are commissioning, any one time, currently 18 artists per “season”. We pay the artists upfront to make the works, which is quite unusual in the art world. They also receive a royalty, which is also quite unusual.

A snapshot of the “Artists” page on the Daata Editions website. The background picture is a frame from Leo Gabin’s “Write Your Name”.

I hope that there are many models, and we are one of many. My view is that we’ll do it very well and hopefully other people will also do well. Just like you need many good galleries in an art fair, and you need many of them in a neighborhood to make it an art center that people might travel to visit. One good thing doesn’t form a market place, but often dominance. What often happens with digital business in the art world is that there’s a desire to be dominant because of the idea of monopoly. You could be the next big thing, the next Facebook or the next Twitter. We are not trying to be that. We are trying to put artists at the center of what we are doing, representing mediums that are actually very much commonplace amongst artists. Really commonplace. It’s almost ridiculous that most artists use digital media even if they are painters, to some degree to research or to communicate. But somehow the art market hasn’t found a way to reflect that yet. And galleries really find it difficult to find a business model around those works and how to find the commodified market place. We are working with art forms that are still finding their feet in that area but we are also working with them because we believe that those are true artists, not some freak shows. All the artists we work with are artists that are emerging and somehow emerged—simply talented artists and digital media is just the way they work.

S: But you seem to have a different language or vocabulary for the components within your model? What’s different about the works in the category “Web”? What’s a “season” (it easily reminds people of TV shows on websites like Netflix)?

DG: A lot of things are about semantics here. It’s trying to find a way to describe what we are doing. You might have noticed that we call everything artists’ video, artists’ sound, artists’ web, because what we see is that artists make the works. It’s not just video art, sounds art or web art—sometimes these are quite old and clumsy terms. The category “Web” is still an amorphous area of different forms of artworks, maybe a website, a video, or GIFs, but it’s enabling us to have different technologies within a section. Right now it’s probably ostensibly things that you could call video in our video section, but they are just made by slightly more emerging artists. With the “seasons”, it is a way of defining what each cycle is. As we were launching, we wanted to give a flavor that Season 1 is the first commissioning cycle. Like on Netflix, you might have a second season, which is a new cycle. What I think of the languages of Netflix is that you go back to Season 1 and Season 2 when you are on Season 10, but are still delighted to look at those seasons. You don’t think of them any less just because they are “older”, and in some cases you realize you have to look at those first.

A snapshot of the “Art” page on the Daata Editions website, where artworks are categorized as “Video”, “Sound” and “Web”.

S: How do you select the artists for each season? How does the collaboration work?

DG: It goes back to what I mentioned as an ecosystem. The artists all have a pretty good aura around them. A few of them recently graduated, like Helen Benigson, Matt Copson, Lina Lapelyte and Charles Richardson. And then there’s others that we have been working with for years and are well known. David Blandy has done a lot of works about gaming and sound cultures. Ed Fornieles and Jon Rafman are both advisors to our project. Leo Gabin, for instance, produce video and film works, but for Daata they have also made sound works for the first time. It’s therefore exciting to commission something that these artists haven’t focused on before. We show them online, but they can be purchased and shown offline. In other words, they are not solely dependent on the online platform. We commission the artists without saying what they should make for us, only that the work should be around 3 minutes or less. The idea is that the works will be fresh, quick and spontaneous. We limit what we do but we never judge the works. There’s no sending back to the artists or saying that we don’t like the works. That’s risky but it’s the way we wanted it to be—trust the artists to deliver. Our business model is a self-sustaining company. The aim is that each cycle is paid for from the previous one, but the artists get paid upfront regardless of sales.

Takeshi Murata, OM Passenger, HD Video, mp4, 0:40 mins ( artwork page on Daata https://daata-editions.com/art/video/takeshi-murata-om-passenger )

S: What about the choice of the website design?

DG: We did something similar with the designer of the website. Studio Scasascia, the company we worked with designed the website of a favorite record company of mine. As I’m comfortable buying music online, I hope to use this model to sell artists’ works as well. My brief to the designers was that we wanted the artists to be the center of the website. We wanted it to be an aesthetically pleasing and also simple platform, doing not more than showing and selling 18 artists’ commissioned works. We commissioned 6 works from each artist, plus one by Jon Rafman, which is free for downloading from the website. Meanwhile all the works can be viewed without registration or payment.

Jon Rafman, Oh the Humanity, HD Video, mp4, 3:00 mins, Unlimited edition.

A certificate for Jon Rafman’s “Oh the Humanity”.

S: Now that the works can be fully accessed on the website, what marks the difference between viewing and owning the works? What do you think drives a collector to purchase something non-physical?

DG: For one artwork, there’s 15 editions for sale. When you purchase one work you can download the high resolution file and own an edition of that work. The price goes up by $100 (in web and sound) or $200 (in video) after each edition sells. The price of a final artwork, for instance in video, can be $5600, which in my view, is probably closest to what the artwork is actually worth. In this way, we want to make it transparent and accessible, so that the works become affordable for many more people. Of course not everyone buys an artwork of $100, but this price is quite cheap for a quality artwork. So we are talking about people who believe in art. We are not trying to convince people who think it’s not worth it, because they might say the same thing about Picasso and Matisse. But still we want those people to be able to watch the works. Unlike Youtube where you find millions of videos and sounds, we are an artist based platform and we show artworks. What drives the collectors is their wish to own artworks, similar to how they come into a gallery or an auction house to buy artworks of other media. I think a collector can do both.

S: How is Daata Editions and your artists doing so far?

DG: We have made some major sales to major art collectors and collections. We will be announcing those in October when we launch the third release. It is in fact magical for us because these are the biggest collectors of this kind of media. It’s also brilliant for the artists because they are now in those big collections. Some of them will truly start their career from this, which could have taken more years for their works to be found or purchased via galleries. Actually, many of the artists on our site don’t have galleries yet. For those who do, several galleries are keen for us to show their artists, because evolving a market for any artist is difficult. So we see what we do as a supportive act. We promote the artists but don’t actually represent them.

Lina Lapelyte, Hunky Bluff ACT2 – Never was a shade, CD Quality sound, wav, 2:57 mins, ( artwork page on Daata https://daata-editions.com/art/sound/lina-lapelyte-hunky-bluff-act2-never-was-a-shade )

S: What’s the sales agreement between Daata Editions and its customers? Do you have something like customer service? What happens if a file is damaged or lost?

DG: If the file on your computer is damaged or lost, you can download again from the website. We won’t make it a problem, since the collectors own the file and their names are on the certificate. If they want to give it to another person and transfer the ownership, they go to the website and change the certificate and then download it in the new owner’s name. Also the collectors can always log in their accounts on our website and view their purchased items online. If a different operating system exists, we will adjust the files to make sure the works play well on it. We want to make the whole process simple and friendly instead of making a prison contract that you enter into. You buy an artwork, and you can view it on whatever platform, and within reason, you can show it in your home and in your office. Of course if you want to show it publicly, the artist owns the intellectual property, and we need to go back to the artist. But we operate based on the trust in the buyer. The art world I operate in is all about good will and credibility, and this world should believe in itself. We don’t want to make the buying of digital art a problem before it’s happened.

S: Did you set a goal of any sort?

DG: We are working with artists, whose natural language is digital and online. We set up this platform with the goal that in the near future people are happy to buy, play and show artworks digitally on their devices. If a gallery can’t sell digital artworks or any time-based media easily, then the artists become compelled to make paintings, sculptures, installations that are easier to commodify. I see digital media equally to the traditional mediums such as painting and sculpture. I hope they can be seen equally by all. With most artists touching upon digital media in some way, we anticipate there will be a real market and audiences will have the confidence to engage with it.

S: Are you confident about creating a “virtual” market for artists and collectors?

DG: Yes. I do think it’s a natural development. It’s not a contrived market because I do believe we are getting to the point where real artists are making really good artworks with digital means. Technology, as their tools, are being used brilliantly. It’s no longer a romanticism of digital media. But again we don’t want to be the only platform to show artists working with digital media. Currently we can’t do more than 18 artists in a season because obviously we, as a small team, are limited. I’d love to think galleries can look at what we are doing and similar companies like ours can copy us, because I believe galleries are the ultimate and best placed curator of the artists they represent. However, many galleries can’t think of doing it, because perhaps they can’t do it properly or still lack the desire. That’s why I think we have to evolve different market places. Not all artworks are sold in the same way. There should be different sales or rental models, but what bonds them, makes them co-exist and move forward together are dialogues and communications. Hopefully we are a powerful voice and I do believe that we are empowering the market place by making people believe they can buy what we have commissioned from the artists and create various commercial relationships.

1 See ANNY SHAW, “Collectors join forces to co-commission digital art”, THE ART NEWSPAPER, 18 June 2015, http://theartnewspaper.com/reports/156860/

The London Open 2015 – a FAD Q&A with Jane Bustin.

In abstract, Art, Artist, FAD, Gallery, Jane Bustin, London Open, LondonOpen2015, Magazine, Minimal, painting, Whitechapel on 21/07/2015 at 12:34 pm
photo 3

Tabitha’s Cape 2014 by Jane Bustin

The London Open 2015 Q&A with artist Jane Bustin. A FAD Magazine Interview

The London Open Whitechapel Gallery’s triennial exhibition has just opened. 48 of the most dynamic and exciting artists have been chosen from an entry of over 2100 and this online interview comes from FAD Magazine …

1. Have you always felt yourself an artist?
Probably after the first week of art school when I realised you could actually just paint all day.

2. Can you tell us more about your work and what are the main ideas you would like to express?
I make abstract formal compositions reflecting on modernism and materiality. & I take influences from 14th century frescos, 15th century Dutch painting, iconography, modernist architecture and design, French modernist literature, dance, fabrics, books, hardware stores, Japanese ceramics, neon signs, cosmetics, sweet wrappers …

My main interest is to create a resonance within the work that goes beyond its material properties.

3. How do you start the process of making work?
The start of the work is always through the choice of materials.

4. Do you consider the viewer, when making your work?
Always and never, since I am primarily the viewer.

5. Name 3 artists that have inspired your work.
Masaccio

Vermeer

Rothko

6. What defines something as a work of art?
When you need to look again and again and something stirs in the pit of your stomach.

7. How was it finding out you had been chosen as part of The London Open?
Satisfying

8. How have you found working with the Whitechapel Gallery on the exhibition?
The curators and assistants have been superb, I have never before as an Artist in a large open exhibition felt so considered, involved and appreciated.

9. What plans do you have to continue to pursue your art career in 2015?
I am looking forward to exhibiting in November at the Ingleby Gallery, Edinburgh in a show ‘Resistance and Persistence’ based on an essay by Sean Scully on Giorgio Morandi, including works from both artists.

10. Final Question – if you had £49,000 to buy art who would you invest it in?
Women Artists over the age of 49!

www.janebustin.com

Get more details on The London Open: HERE

Whitechapel Gallery

77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Tube: Aldgate East 

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/

T +44 (0)20 7522 7888 

E info@whitechapelgallery.org

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The London Open 2015

Galleries 1, 8 & 9

Mon: Closed

Tues, Weds, Fri, Sat, Sun: 11am–6pm

Thurs: 11am–9pm