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Archive for the ‘NADA’ Category

The artwork is a digital file, yes by Pau Waelder – a new Foreword for Daata Editions

In Art Basel, Art Video, Collecting, Collector, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, NADA, Pau Waelder, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 16/11/2018 at 11:26 am

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The artwork is a digital file, yes

by Pau Waelder

A new Foreword for Daata Editions

When considering how to collect digital art, we come across two preconceptions: what an artwork must be and what digital files are worth. First, it is commonly assumed that an artwork is an object with unique attributes, original, and irreplaceable. The object routinely goes from the artist’s studio to the gallery, where it is acquired by a collector. There is no doubt that it is always the same object that trades hands, and it is finally the collector who decides where the artwork is placed and who has access to it. Conceptual and performance art has challenged this notion again and again, but the artwork always finds its way into the market and the collector’s home in the form of a more or less stable object. Thus, if an artwork (a) is not an object, (b) can be copied, (c) can be accessed or experienced beyond the control of its owner(s), and/or (c) requires a computer, software and display to be at all perceivable, some may find it “difficult,” “challenging,” or even not worth collecting. This relates to the second preconception.

Our computers, tablets and smartphones are constantly storing digital files. Most of them we have created ourselves, others we have downloaded for free or for a fee. They fill the device’s storage space and force us to either copy them to other devices, store them in the cloud or delete them. Digital files are therefore constantly moved around, copied and erased, both a necessity and a burden. In most cases, we don’t know what to do with them, they just linger in folders and hidden directories until detected by a cleanup app or simply obliterated when the device that stores them reaches the end of its service life. Digital files, therefore, tend to be considered expendable in the sense that there should always be another copy somewhere. In fact, a growing segment of the entertainment industry relies on selling access to content on digital files that we temporarily store in our devices and swiftly remove when we are done watching the film, tv series, or documentary; listening to the song or podcast; reading the book, graphic novel or magazine. Many times, the file is not even downloaded, it is streamed and thus disappears the moment it is not used anymore, without leaving a trace. When we pay for the content, we either rely on it being safely stored by the provider and always conveniently accessible or we just want to experience it and never care what happens to it afterwards, because there will always be more, newer content ready to be clicked on.

My point is that artworks and digital files seem to be incompatible, due to how we tend to conceive artworks and our daily experience with digital files. Artworks are forever, digital files are ephemeral. Artworks are unique objects, digital files are immaterial worthless copies. However, an artwork does not need to be an object. In fact, a painting is not an object, it is an image that becomes a physical object because the pigment needs to be placed on a surface and canvases make it easier than walls to create, move around and sell the images. An artwork created in a digital format (a video, sound, jpeg, gif, 3D animation, browser-based piece or what have you) is not only always a copy but also the result of a software interpreting a file on a certain display, so every time it is experienced it turns out to be, in a way, a unique performance. Of course, one has to make sure that the software works with the file and that the display shows the piece as intended, but that’s all part of the artwork being something other than a static, physical object –which would nevertheless require certain conditions of placement, lighting, humidity and so forth. Finally, the artwork may be available to others even if it is safely at home and a certificate of authenticity, kept in the safe, states that no one else owns it. Artworks have a life of their own as they are viewed in exhibitions, reproduced in photographs and videos, distributed in magazines, books and blogs. Most of the art we know and love, we have never owned and will never own – even big collectors know and love much more art than they have bought. A large part of that art we have seen through reproductions, mostly on screens. It is still part of us, and for those who were lucky, smart or powerful enough to buy it, the more people who feel that the artwork is part of them, the better. For what good is it to own something that no one else knows about, that none can appreciate, that cannot be shared?

Digital art allows us to own and at the same time share an artwork – not only its reproduction. This can raise some eyebrows and insecurities. It may be argued that if the artwork is available elsewhere or that it can be copied, it loses its value. However, in addition to what I have already stated about the nature of a digital file, let us consider what Nelson Goodman found to be the difference between an original artwork and a forgery: its history of production. A digital artwork that has been purchased from a reputable source with a valid registry of authenticity has a history of production that can be established from the artist to the collector. No matter how many copies of the artwork may circulate, only the collector – or collectors if the artwork is editioned– can claim ownership and, more importantly, become part of the history of the artwork. This is not just provenance, which will matter to the next owner, but an active involvement in the existence of the artwork, its relevance and also in supporting the work of the artist. This is where Daata Editions comes in. Daata commissions art that is sold through its online platform in limited editions. The artists are paid to produce artworks that anyone can buy with a few clicks. The buyer can download the artwork and store it in her computer, on the cloud, wherever, make copies and display them on any device she owns. The rest of us can see the same artwork – watermarked – on the platform, appreciate it, maybe feel the urge to own it too. But we won’t be part of the artwork’s history, only those who bought it do. And those who are lucky or smart enough get the first edition.

Pau Waelder is a curator, writer and researcher whose work focuses on contemporary art and new media.

https://daata-editions.com/

Daata Editions New Artist Releases & NADA Miami – Coming Soon – Press Release Info

In Animal Charms, Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Basel Miami Beach, Bex Ilsley, Bob Bicknell Knight, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Jakob Kudsk Steensen, Miami, NADA, Ollie Dook, Puck Verkade, Rustan Söderling, Shamus Clisset, Stine Deja, Thomas Yeomans, Uncategorized on 05/11/2018 at 10:40 am

DAATA EDITIONS NEWS 

Daata Editions is excited to announce the forthcoming release on Dec 5 of new artworks by Ollie Dook (trailer), Jakob Kudsk Steensen & Puck Verkade (trailer), along with new works selected for Daata’s Curated section by Bob Bicknell-Knight with artists featuring in Flow My Tears; Shamus Clisset, Stine Deja, Bex Ilsley, Rustan Söderling and Thomas Yeomans, to coincide with Daata featuring at NADA Miami in December 2018.

Puck 1

Image: Puck Verkade, Lucy Live, Courtesy of the artist and Daata Editions

Daata Editions at NADA Miami, 6-9 December 2018, Ice Palace Studios, 1400 North Miami Avenue, Miami, FL 33136 www.newartdealers.org/

Daata at NADA will feature new artist releases on framed iPads in the Daata Editions booth 3.01. Animal Charms, features the newly commissioned artworks by Ollie Dook (Animal Stories), Jakob Kudsk Steensen (REWILDLING) and Puck Verkade (Lucy Live), each in their own way deal with themes of evolution, extinction, preservation and new alternatively reconstructed realities where the boundaries between animal and human are blurred as part of the contemporary experience.

The works will all be available to view and buy online on December 5.

Jakob Kudsk Steensen’s video work for Daata, REWILDLING, will be on show simultaneously in conjunction with RE-ANIMATED, Kudsk Steensen’s first institutional solo show in Denmark, taking place at Tranen in Copenhagen, and curated by Toke Lykkeberg.

Daata Editions x Vanity Projects are delighted to present Puck Verkade on view at both Vanity Projects Miami and Vanity Projects NYC coinciding with the presentation at NADA. Puck’s new artwork Lucy Live will also be part of Verkade’s solo presentation at Forde in Geneva, opening on Dec 6. Puck Verkade TRAILER

Ollie Dook and his Daata commissioned works Animal Stories will feature in a group show Silly Symphony including artists; Dook, Andy Holden, Bobby, Philippe and Sputnik, Dec 8 –  Jan 5 at Ex-Baldessare in Bedford. Ollie Dook Trailer

At NADA Miami, Daata will also show new composite artwork of Tracey Emin’s six Daata Editions commissioned sound poems and will be playing Jacolby Satterwhite’s suite of eight videos En Plein Air Abstraction.

A new curated online playlist by Bob Bicknell-Knight Flow My Tears featuring artists Shamus Clisset, Stine Deja, Bex Ilsley, Jillian Mayer, Jonathan Monaghan, Rustan Söderling and Thomas Yeomans will also be available to view online. Flow My Tears TRAILER

Full Press Release attached, more information and images HERE

Daata Editions

New Art Dealers (NADA)

Trailer 

Daata Editions at Independent NY & Spring Place

In Daata, Daata Editions, Independent, NADA, New York, Scott Reeder, spring place, The Armory Show, Uncategorized on 18/02/2018 at 9:36 am

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Independent New York and Spring Place Launch a Programme of Artist-Created Audio and Film Installations, Selected by Curator David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions. 

Independent, March 8-11, 2018. Spring Studios, 50 Varick Street, New York, NY 10013.

Daata Editions‘ sound and video curator David Gryn is programming a series of immersive audio experiences and film screenings throughout the public spaces of Independent and Spring Place for the duration of Independent New York in March 2018. The new collaborative initiative will be co-hosted by Spring Place at their Sunken Living Room and the programme will feature a selection of audio and video works by artists from the exhibiting galleries and Daata Editions, transforming the experience of the common areas.

Artists to be featured include: Larry Achiampong, Sofie Alsbo, Maria Antelman, Thora Dolven Balke, Cara Benedetto, Lynda Benglis, BREYER P-ORRIDGE, Jake Chapman, Rob Chavasse, Matt Copson, Keren Cytter, Shezad Dawood, Brice Dellsperger, Elliot Dodd, Graham Dolphin, Alexandra Drewchin (eartheater), Tracey Emin, FlucT, Ed Fornieles, Luke Fowler & Sue Tompkins, Leo Gabin, Douglas Gordon, Brent Green, Joseph Grigely, Eloise Hawser, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, Lina Lapelyte, David Lynch, Laurel Nakadate, Rashaad Newsome, Tin Ojeda, Hannah Perry, puppies puppies, Torbjørn Rødland, Scott & Tyson Reeder (feat: The Fall), Ariana Reines, Marina Rosenfeld, Richard Sides, John Skoog, Scott Treleaven, Stephen Vitiello, Saya Woolfalk and more.

Institute 193 – playlist artists: Georgiana B. Pettway and Creola B. Pettway, Three Legged Race, Street Gnar, Idiot Glee, The Smacks, Lonnie Holley, Jules Trakker (Resonant Hole), Ben Sollee, Silas House, Matt Duncan, Anna & Elizabeth, Ben Durham and Robert Beatty, Jeanne Vomit-Terror, Rayna Gellert, Phillip March Jones, ATTEMPT, Morgan O’Kane, Groove Merchants, Louis Zoellar Bickett II

Galleries include: 303 Gallery, Canada, Chapter NY, Elizabeth Dee, Nagel Draxler, Andrew Edlin Gallery & Institute 193, INVISIBLE-EXPORTS, François Ghebaly, The Modern Institute, Carlos / Ishikawa, Neue Alte Brücke, Night Gallery, The Sunday Painter, Air de Paris, Peres Projects, Cheim & Read, Tilton Gallery & Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, untilthen, VI, VII.

BUY THE DAATA EDITIONS ARTWORKS FEATURED AT INDEPENDENT HERE

Image: Scott Reeder, Nodes, 2017

Daata Editions News: Anhedonia, Jacky Connolly, Chrissie Iles, NADA NY, Andrew Goldstein, A Goth Life, Strangelove, Cacophony at MOUart, NAUSEA VR …

In A Goth Life, Andrew Goldstein, Anhedonia, artnet, Chrissie Iles, David Gryn, Jacky Connolly, Leo Gabin, Metaphysics, NADA, NewArtDealers, Strangelove, Terry Smith, Uncategorized, VR on 28/02/2017 at 1:45 pm

Daata Editions latest news …

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Daata Editions Presents

Anhedonia, 2017 by Jacky Connolly

NADA New York, March 2–5, 2017

Daata Editions – Booth 1.03
Skylight Clarkson North, 572 Washington St. New York, NY 10014

Jacky Connolly’s Anhedonia, 2017, a New Daata Editions Commission. 18 minutes, screened daily throughout the art fair opening times.

Anhedonia talk: Chrissie Iles, the Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York will be in conversation with Jacky Connolly on Saturday March 4 at 3pm in the NADA New York Auditorium, introduced by David Gryn of Daata Editions.

https://www.newartdealers.org/

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Daata Editions presents a new Foreword by Andrew Goldstein, editor-in-chief of artnet News

When it comes to existing in the ebb and flow of the art market, the paradoxical conundrum of digital (aka new media) art is present in its very name: While we live in an increasingly digital world, making such art ever more essential to mirror our lived experiences, the fact that we can’t touch this advanced variety of art with our own palpating digits makes it harder to sell, trickier to collect, and less commercially viable on the whole. …

Will this new art form one day come to us through subscription services, with physical objects as upsells? Will access to streaming digital art eventually be bundled together with other paid services, à la Amazon Prime? The commercial viability of digital art depends upon the continuation of such experiments, with persistent ingenuity and the ability to see beyond the time-honoured mechanism of gallery sales. For this reason, Daata Editions deserves our gratitude, and support.

Read the full text here

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A Goth Life … (A Stranger Love Version playlist)
Curated by Daata Editions
Space Bar & Gallery, Folkestone 13/14 March 2017

FREE continuous screening all day 11-5pm

Strangelove Time Based Media Festival 9-24 March 2017

A Goth Life is a compilation from artwork editions on Daata Editions
Artists: Larry Achiampong, Thora Dolven Balke, David Blandy, Jake Chapman, Jacky Connolly, Keren Cytter, Casey Jane Ellison, Tracey Emin, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Yung Jake, Rachel Maclean, Jillian Mayer, Takeshi Murata, Rashaad Newsome, Tameka Norris, Hannah Perry, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Scott Reeder, Jacolby Satterwhite, Zadie Xa.

lg_surfer-ho-remix

Cacophony

A playlist selection of Artist Sound on Daata Editions.

MOUart, Beijing, China

19 March – 19 April 2017

Artists: Larry Achiampong, Sofie Alsbo, Thora Dolven Balke, Jake Chapman, Matt Copson, Graham Dolphin, Tracey Emin, Leo Gabin, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, Lina Lapelyte, Rashaad Newsome, Hannah Perry, Ariana Reines, John Skoog, Stephen Vitiello.
Curated by David Gryn

A collaboration between http://mouart.com and http://daata-editions.com
Image: Leo Gabin – Surfer Ho Remix, 2015

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NAUSEA – A VR Exhibition by Metaphysics

Now Available via Daata Editions.

NAUSEA – A Virtual Reality exhibition for the HTC Vive curated and produced by Philip Hausmeier and his startup Metaphysics presents six artworks by the artists Eddie Peake, Florian Meisenberg, Anne de Vries, Rubén Grilo, Jack Strange and Anna K.E. The works are connected through an innovative portal system, showing a prototype of how art could be experienced in the future.

Daata presents Anhedonia by Jacky Connolly at NADA New York 2017

In Anhedonia, Chrissie Iles, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Jacky Connolly, NADA, New Art Dealers, New York, Uncategorized, Whitney on 20/02/2017 at 11:45 am

anhedonia-computer

Daata Editions presents …

Anhedonia, 2017 by Jacky Connolly

NADA New York, March 2–5, 2017 (Booth 1.03)
Skylight Clarkson North, 572 Washington St. New York, NY 10014 

https://www.newartdealers.org/

VIP Preview by Invitation: Thursday, March 2, 12–2pm
Opening Preview by Invitation: Thursday, March 2, 2–4pm

Chrissie Iles, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Curator, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and Jacky Connolly in Conversation at the NADA Auditorium: Saturday, March 4, 3–3.45pm

Jacky Connolly, Anhedonia, 2017 (a New Daata Editions Artist Commission)
In Anhedonia (2017), a machinima film in six parts, Jacky Connolly turns her filmmaking practice towards a mysterious group home in the virtual American South. Several avatars live in three small buildings near the town’s railroad yard, where their lives are punctuated by hours spent in front of a screen. Images from elsewhere begin to intrude with mounting intensity, as the boundaries of the film are fractured by the characters’ visual and auditory hallucinations. These moments of psychosis give insight into the characters’ shared histories, as well as the dissociative atmosphere of their cultural landscape.

Jacky Connolly (b. 1990, Lower Hudson Valley, USA) is an artist and filmmaker based in New York. Connolly’s film works are indebted to cinematic and literary genre influences, as well as an innovative use of machinima technique for imaginative world-making and storytelling. She recently completed Hudson Valley Ruins (2016), a 30-minute machinima film created in a life simulation computer game.

Jacky Connolly’s commissioned artworks for Daata can be viewed and acquired online. There are 6 works available in chapters: 1. Anhedonia, 2. Anemia, 3. Alexithymia, 4. Amygdala, 5. Anorexia, 6. Amnesia, each in an edition of 26, of which 20 are for sale. An additional composite feature version (screened daily at NADA) is available for art Institutional acquisition and international film screenings. http://daata-editions.com

Chrissie Iles will be in conversation with Jacky Connolly on Saturday March 4 at 3pm in the NADA New York auditorium space, introduced by David Gryn of Daata Editions. Chrissie Iles is the Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, and her recent curatorial exhibition was “Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art, 1905–2016”. http://whitney.org/

The New Art Dealers Alliance (NADA) is the definitive non-profit arts organization dedicated to the cultivation, support, and advancement of new voices in contemporary art. Daata Editions is collaborating with NADA as a Cultural Partner. https://www.newartdealers.org/

Image: Anhedonia by Jacky Connolly, 2017 (courtesy of artist and Daata Editions)

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Artspace – My Favorite Works from LISTE 2016 – preview

In Andrew Goldstein, Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Artspace, Bauer Hotel, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Jane Bustin, Liste, NADA, Uncategorized on 06/06/2016 at 8:48 pm

Daata Editions Director David Gryn’s Favorite Works from LISTE 2016

http://www.artspace.com/magazine/contributors/picks/david-gryn-liste-picks-53886

By Artspace Editors

June 6, 2016

Daata Editions Director David Gryn's Favorite Works from LISTE 2016

Daata Editions Director David Gryn. Photo by Alberto de Nart (shot at the Bauer Palladio, Venice)

David Gryn is the director and co-founder of the year-old digital art and video collecting platform Daata Editions and the film curator at Art Basel Miami Beach, so it’s perhaps unsurprising that his picks for LISTE 2016 tend toward moving images, technological interventions, and outide-the-box thinking of all kinds. Read up on the rationale behind his selections here, and stop by the fair from June 14-19 in Basel, Switzerland for more art world action.

MICHAEL AUDER
Gemälde II, 2015
Fonti

auder

As someone who ostensibly works with artists of the moving image I was compelled to select Michel Auder, a rare artist that seamlessly crosses the terrain between both art and filmmaking. Here’s a quote from Michel Auder that matches my thoughts on this selection: “When people ask me what’s the best thing I like, my head starts scrambling and I just can’t think of anything. Depending on the day, I might say this or that. I really don’t have any specific thing that I like better than others.”

 

JESSE DARLING
Colonel Shanks, 2016
Arcadia Missa

Jesse Darling

The Jesse Darling works shown by Arcadia Missa have a great sense of self, humor, and balance. I have been aware of Jesse and her work for some time and it is really getting the attention it deserves.

INGA MELDERE
“Students painting some of the remarkable scenery in the park”, 2016
Temnikova & Kasela Gallery

meldere

I have always been a big fan of the “sublime,” so this humorous Caspar David Friedrich-esque take by Inga Meldere took me by surprise. Temnikova and Kasela Gallery is an Estonian gallery and an art world gem.

 

SHANA MOULTON
Every Angle is an Angel, 2016
Galerie Crevoecoeur

moulton

Last year I selected Shana Mouton’s MindPlace ThoughtStream for the film program I curate for Art Basel Miami Beach—I knew how much I valued the work as I took endless images of it whilst it was playing on the huge 7000 square foot outdoor screen. I recently spent many days with Shana’s moving image works as a Daata Editions neighbor to the Gregor Staiger space at Independent Brussels and was mesmerized by the work’s magic. They are witty, aesthetic, intelligent, and spellbinding—they really are complete artworks.

 

ERKKA NISSINEN
Vantaa, 2007
Ellen de Bruijne Projects

nissinen

Crazy, funny, dark, engaging, bizarre—everything we should want from a great Finnish artist. Brilliant.

 

XIMENA GARRIDO-LECCA
Destilaciones, 2014
80m2 Livia Benavides

lecca

I have been increasingly observing that ceramics making their presence felt at art fairs. This is chiefly because my wife, the artist Jane Bustin, makes wonderful artworks with ceramic and porcelain (as well as paint, metals and fabrics)—my eye has been altered irrevocably to look more and more at this medium. This Ximena Garrido-Lecca installation at 80m2 Livia Benavides is earthy, historical, current, and intriguing.

 

DAWN KASPER
M44, 2016
David Lewis

kasper
I am drawn to these Dawn Kasper sculptures, as I am obsessed with music intersecting with art making.

 

YURI PATTISON
dust scraper fan 1.9 (power and wealth to honor leaders or religions to stretch architectural limits), 2016
mother’s tankstation

pattison

Yuri Pattison pushes the boundaries of our art world and how data engages with us all. I’m hugely looking forward to his first UK institutional show at Chisenhale opening in July, as well the outcomes of his winning the Frieze Artist Prize for 2016.

 

GERDA SCHEEPERS
The Style, 2016
Blank

scheepers

Gerda Scheepers makes collages that disturb and disrupt, but are cohesive and use disparate materials to create an aesthetic whole.


Notes:

Overall in my selections I have been somewhat drawn to similar sculptural forms and colours evolving from a variety of materials (Sheepers, Pattison, Kasper, Darling) and obviously (to me) selecting some moving image works (Nissinen, Moulton, Auder), as they are great and it is vital that galleries at art fairs bring art forms that do not necessarily have the same commercial allure as 2d object based artworks, but as art mediums that are being used by most artists, which you would not believe, if you only ever saw artworks at art fairs.

I am always looking at/and for moving image and sound works at art fairs … and alas, rarely find much. It has been my work for over the last 15 years – being focused on showing artists moving image works and most often projects during major art fair periods, as this is when the finite art audience reaches its highest demand for art consumption. 

Liste, like NADA, Sunday, etc … gives us hope in the art world that there is the potential for great new galleries, new artists, new ideas – before the cyclical homogeneity (albeit often great!) of the major art fair commercial allure sets it.

Notes for the Second Season of Daata Editions by Anton Haugen

In Anton Haugen, Arachne, Daata, Daata Editions, Gavlak, NADA, New Art Dealers, Rhizome, Uncategorized on 06/05/2016 at 12:13 pm

 

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Michael Manning, Dinner Party in the Garden, 2016

Notes for the Second Season of Daata Editions 

by Anton Haugen

In approaching a platform like Daata Editions, one searches for an apt way to describe the experience of screen-based works. In the past, too often have the gallery and its spatial metaphors been invoked to falsely characterize the experience of artwork on the internet, reducing the medium to a mere extension of the gallery structure. This glaring lack necessitates born-digital platforms like Daata Editions and, importantly, new contextual frameworks that can provide ways of understanding these works. However, it’s so easy to forget yourself on a screen. While dependence on mnemonic aids does leave private memory to falter, users are known to experience difficulty in locating the mental faculty to fully separate from the digital networks within which they exist; these networks, in turn, are all too often a systemization and amplification of offline social strata. Where in the past there seemed an unmediated flow of time, there is now an interconnected superfluity of images, capable of simultaneously enveloping and further segmenting any possible interval of a day. Art, once delineated to studios for production and to controlled environments for preservation and reception, finds itself liberated, only to be subject to the comingled flows of content and time. Although there once was the hope that the global village would provide the conditions to transform each person into an artist who would see contemporaneity as a task or an environment to be discussed, to be analyzed, and to be coped with, increasingly, we find this work performed and prepackaged for us: the auxiliaries meant to allow us the tools to cope with the present algorithmically derive their means through the data from ourselves as well as the data from human and nonhuman others, placing us further under the gaze of power and perhaps further from the means to clarify the future. Coping becomes a hyper-individuated task: a task that approaches the apex of a drive towards what can be described as a bureaucratic and alienating specialization.

In its presentation of content by decentralized and reversible analogies, hypertext and its non-linear organization can be seen as indicative of this societal abandonment of culminating narratives. Content and this self-referential nature of its context have altered the ways in which artistic production occurs and is received. Cameras are omnipresent; their images are perpetually in post-production and often possess more apparent value in their metadata than in their content. Scroll bars and load times have supplanted past narrative structures, and with its schizophrenic switching between texts, images, and videos, the internet, at its utmost, has made the mind more malleable to erasure and new traces — the screen is a place for forgetting. Like the impossibility of imagining the platonic ideal of a photograph, the screen finds its definition in its capabilities as a displaying mechanism. The screen and its contents may gather attentions but remains a terminal locus.

Through itself and its architecture, the web uniformly characterizes digital content with the attributes of a performance: each act of downloading or streaming reawakens and performs the apparatuses, both technical and textual, that had laid behind the content’s initial production. With this performativity, screens lend themselves to the blending of manifest ephemerality with invisible permanence, despite these qualities’ diametric opposition. Though one often finds within digital content an appeal to difference within the quotidian, materially, what often occurs is a willingness to deny space in favor of digital content. Spaces, whether within an arts institution or not, begin to slowly transform in order to best invoke that private, half-dreaming denial found in the darkness of a cinema.

Digital memory’s infinite capacity for retention and invocation often leaves one with the feeling of cold feet, considering the oceanic dimensions of the concatenations, both material and immaterial, within this Borges-like archive of digital traces. As content has drastically changed, this context has accordingly resulted in a different impetus towards art curation and viewership. The role of the curator seems less a declaration of a definition of historicity or of belonging to a certain encompassing narrative than an assertion that nears breakage of this type of digital memory’s associative capacities: becoming less a gate and more of a node or transitory centering within the pareidolic fissures that this digital mentality creates. As it is now where the majority of monetary and bureaucratic transactions take place, the internet perhaps no longer possesses its former glean of subversion or utopic transformative visions, but, in the way that documentation generally precedes the presence of the object, the immateriality of the file could be said to possess more of “the real” than the material art object due to digital dissemination’s access and sometimes chaotic democratization.

In a gesture that can be seen as reactive to the general reticence to fully embrace this state of affairs, Daata Editions sees the fertile ground within this immaterial context. Daata is a simple solution, among an infinite number of possible solutions, to a difficult problem: how to promote the production of works that are made to exist for and accordance to the web. Placing artists at the center of its platform, Daata Editions shows how digital dissemination can be a sustainable distribution model for art. In a manner that echoes photographic editions or an artist book, the commissioning platform issues numbered editions of each new work for purchase, demonstrating an understanding of how artistic production can exist empowered rather than destabilized by its digital mass reproducibility and accessibility.

Daata’s curation promotes a certain type of work that considers how medium and content function within the web’s immediate and immaterial context. Typified by their employment of the vernaculars of the web, the works do not seek recourse in the label of art but are instead mindful of how one would produce works targeted to the multi-faceted audiences of the web where there is often the collapse in the distinction between producer and consumer. In a way, artistic work has already become part of the ceaseless flow of content found on any newsfeed. Through Daata, this form of work becomes viable. By allowing users to purchase art in the same way one can buy content from distributors like iTunes, Daata forgoes the model of a gallery in favor of a platform reminiscent of a digital auction to reflect the nuanced mentality of art viewership on the internet: one doesn’t stroll but scrolls.

Now in its second season, Daata Editions furthers its reach, commissioning new works by forty-two artists and expanding its collection to include a poetry tranche. In its navigation of market viability and discursive substance, Daata Editions continues to set new paths for the intersection of art and the web, promoting work that weaves this interstice into the flow of digital content.

Anton Haugen is a writer from Silicon Valley. His texts have frequently appeared in Rhizome and Arachne.

Michael Manning is represented by Gavlak Gallery

Loreta Lamargese text on Daata Editions

In Art, Art Basel, Art Fair, Chloe Wise, Daata, Digital, Frieze, Gryn, Hammer, NADA, Online, Rafman, Sound, Stoschek, Video, Zabludowicz on 19/10/2015 at 10:54 am
Chloe Wise, should I add an emoji, 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Chloe Wise, should I add an emoji, 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Loreta Lamargese on Daata Editions

Daata Editions offers a novel platform to solve a longstanding concern: how to commodify, collect, and distribute intangible and already-networked digital artwork. Probing this question reveals a nested paradox: while we’ve become increasingly reliant upon and enthralled by the digital, artworks that employ new media are thought of as being positioned outside the art market. It is becoming more and more difficult to disentangle ourselves from the digital web and artists – like all those included in the three artwork releases from Daata Editions Season One – are using its medial language to engage with their surroundings. At the same time, it is inane to think that we don’t rely heavily on the market – one that has thus far been thought to absorb only singular and static objects – and that the market isn’t a chief harbinger controlling which artworks and artists receive visibility and clout. And yet, many artists who reject a tradition of trading solely in tangible and discrete art objects, who use digitality as both a site that needs mining and as a material to be manipulated, are visible and powerful contenders in the current contemporary art arena.

What makes Daata Editions particularly significant at our present moment is that it fuses the seeming discord between the market and digital material, organizing artists’ video, sound, and web-based work and having that work available online as editions. In fact, Daata makes clear that these two apparently dissonant entities depend on similar structures, relying on a rapid and seamless transition of information; both are, after all, networked and global. The artists presented in Daata Editions are producing works that operate beyond the sanctified walls of galleries and are experimenting with the fungibility of concepts that fit diverse media and operate on these diverse platforms simultaneously. Similarly, while Daata is primarily stationed online, it does not limit itself to the borderless web, involving additional presentations at art fairs such as a recent collaboration with NADA New York.

Now with its third artwork release, it is safe to say the initial hypothesis that launched the platform is true: that when given an intuitive mode to consume and sell digital artwork – when given the opportunity to purchase new media on indigenous soil- collectors would take ownership. Editions by artists such as Amalia Ulman, Chloe Wise, Ed Fornieles, Jon Rafman, and Leo Gabin made available through Daata Editions are now housed in preeminent international collections including the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, The Zabludowicz Collection, London, and The Julia Stoschek Collection in Dusseldorf. And while private collectors and institutions alike fold moving images and sound works into their collections, artists continue to expand the limits of contemporary art practices, renegotiating our reliance on any particular medium or site.

While I’m hesitant to stress the intrinsically utopic qualities of digital art, its malleability with place and material affords it distance from hermeneutic singularity or ontological fixity. The dynamic chain of reformatting that these digital works undergo lends them to active and multifarious meanings and concepts. For example, Chloe Wise’s series created for Daata Editions, Do You Really Think He Fingered Her?, sees the artist subverting the notion of determined and legible identification. In this collection of videos, we find a friend and collaborator of the artist, Robyn Fox, reciting overheard phrases and the Twitter feeds of Art Basel Miami Beach attendees and friends of the artist. Because Fox is costumed in Wise’s clothes and because Wise often uses her own image in her artwork, we are compelled to read Fox as Wise, collapsing barriers of individualization normally fixed to bodies. And why shouldn’t we? If the video itself, as well as the material from social media that Fox recites, proliferates on multiple channels and in different formats at overlapping intervals, then why should identities and meaning be fixed and contained rather than performed and adaptable?

Since its emergence, artists working with video have struggled to monetize their practice while making hefty contributions to the history of art, changing our modes of perceiving and altering our relationship to objects and images. The current generation of young artists working in new media, including those presented in Daata Editions, is widening the net of possibilities under which image creation and circulation can exist. They are entering the conversation at a vital moment, one in which new economic platforms attempt to keep up with them, finding original means to sell and distribute migrant and non-discrete objects. Daata Editions is an early contributor to this new economy, which not only considers but also focuses and exists within the digital realm. Now entering its third artwork release, Daata Editions has tested these murky waters, shedding light on the possibilities of nurturing and distributing artwork that gains dynamism through circulation – through the very media it takes from.

Loreta Lamargese is a curator and researcher based in Montreal, Canada and works at Galerie Division

Galerie Division http://www.galeriedivision.com/montreal/

Daata Editions http://daata-editions.com

Daata Editions featured in Elephant Magazine – Summer 2015

In Art, Art Basel, artists, Daata Editions, Elephant, Frieze, Magazine, Moving Image, NADA, Post-Internet, Video on 29/06/2015 at 12:00 pm
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Ed Fornieles, Bathing (2015). Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions

Daata-Editions

Dates: Ongoing

Daata-Editions launched its online platform for the sale of video, web and sound editions at NADA, Frieze New York, Salon 94 and Soho House this spring. The simple and extremely well designed project allows collectors to easily and confidently download digital art forms that have until now been thought of as difficult to acquire.

“It’s about creating an economy for artists working in these mediums during a curious time of change” says founder David Gryn, who has been working with artists for over twenty years, including curating the film programme at Art Basel Miami Beach. “People think that online is some kind of mythological space where things happen automatically, but that’s not the case. We need to encourage artists to know that these mediums are valued.”

‘Season One’ of Daata-Editions sees 18 artists including Ed Forneiles, Leo Gabin, Chloe Wise, Florian Meisenberg, David Blandy, Hannah Perry and Ilit Azoulay commissioned to produce six works, no longer than three minutes long each, which will be released on the site regularly. The artists are commissioned and paid in full for the works, as well as receiving royalties on the sale of the editions, and are free to experiment entirely on their artworks.

You can view and buy the works at www.daata-editions.com

by Molly Taylor, Elephant Magazine

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Taken from the latest print issue of Elephant Magazine

Elephant, Issue 23, Summer 2015 – What is Post Internet Art ?

Pages 19, 29, 135, 136

Elephant and Daata image

Daata Editions by Courtney Malick

In Art, artists, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Empower, Freieze, Moving Image, NADA, New York, NYC, Sound, Video on 01/06/2015 at 1:11 pm

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DAATA EDITIONS LAUNCH – A REFLECTION

by Courtney Malick

Perhaps one of the most difficult merges to successfully forge within contemporary art is between the curatorial and the commercial. Often when we seek to place what, from a curatorial perspective, seem to be productive frameworks around a grouping of artists, their work, and the ideas that they share, we lose the quality of broad universalism and “timelessness” that collectors may seek in new acquisitions to the margins of site-specificity and the binds of “context.” What makes malleable and unique projects such as Daata Editions stand out in their attempt at the pairing of these two supposedly adverse spectrums, that of the curatorial and that of the commercial, is its specific interest in artists whose work yields to the diverse but nonetheless pre-framed, non-site of the Internet. Furthermore, as both a curatorial and commercial project that is presenting new and commissioned works in video, new media and sound, Daata Editions is able to set certain guidelines beforehand, which allows visitors to the site and potential collectors of the works available there, a levelled playing field. In this way the sometimes fussy issue of context, from a curatorial standpoint, can be seen as a benefit rather than a constraint, which thus furthers the meaning of the works in question.

This platform is particularly exciting to see emerging right now, as so many younger artists, including all of those whose work appears in the first iteration of Daata Editions that launched at NADA New York in May 2015, are working in ways that resist traditional modes of exhibition, reception and therefore of collecting as well. It is important that while we continue to find new artists whose work pushes the definition of contemporary art, that there are also ever developing formats through which such work can be accessed and best understood. Older, conventional formats often found within the white cube, in which paintings are still hung on white walls and sculptures still meticulously placed on white pedestals, need not be replaced, so long as alternate avenues through which to engage with art and the complex ideas that it generates, continues to expand along with the work itself – such is clearly the admirable aim of Daata Editions. Contrary to the well trodden paths canonized by the white cube, artists such as Ed Fornieles, Jon Rafman, Amalia Ullman and the many others that Daata Editions commissioned work from, all of whom are still in relatively early stages of their practices, are specifically trouble-shooting, so to speak, in order to produce work that operates on other levels that exist in various realms including on the internet, within mobile social media systems, as apps, and generally as circuit-driven pieces of a much larger whole, as opposed to creating singular, physically tangible works that stand on their own or make one digestible statement.

For example, Ullman’s video, White Flag Emoji 1 (2015), utilizes Youtube clips and a security camera system called Dropcam and is set in various Airbnb apartments. In this way, while the work itself manifests as a singular video, its contents are fragmented and reference the online world, in its similarly fractured and link-driven nature. Such complex work still finds itself in galleries and museums, but it is most at home online, where it exists within a broader milieu and where its potential audience and collector-base can continue to grow and grow over time. Daata Editions also allows for a new generation of collectors, by commissioning works that exist within a larger edition range and are thus more affordable than most work of any media that is found and acquired through commercial galleries.

It is clear that Daata Editions allows for many new ways to think about collecting video, sound and new media art, and this exciting turn is also extended with the project’s intermittent interjections into art fairs, such as their recent collaboration with NADA New York. Though Daata Editions home base will remain online, where it has the ability to seep most easily into more and more visual and discursive outlets where its commissioned works can be seen, partnering with other commercial organizations such as NADA and Frieze among others, continues to promote their curatorial agenda and at the same time allows more potential collectors to consider new strategies for collecting editioned and digitized artworks. The more Daata Editions spreads this new methodology both online and through ongoing collaboration with various exhibition and commercially oriented organizations, the more the project’s core model will mirror the nature of the work it presents, which functions on various levels simultaneously. It is this through-line between work and methodology that makes the project especially compelling to watch as it continues to unfold.

Text taken from the Foreward at Daata Editions https://daata-editions.com/info/foreword

Courtney Malick website http://courtneymalick.com/