David Gryn blog

Archive for the ‘Video Art’ Category

Daata Editions and New Models for Artist Commissioning, Distribution and Exhibition

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Digital, digital art, Uncategorized, Video Art on 16/03/2019 at 12:39 pm

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David Gryn (Director of DAATA EDITIONS, London) | Video Art Distribution. From Alternative Art Market to Commercialisation

The conference broached the issue of the interaction of art production, art market and exhibition concerning the media art on an international level. The historical development and specific tasks of video art distribution, the current fields of activity as well as the current challenges of internet-based market approaches have been discussed. David Gryn, Director of DAATA EDITIONS, talks about his website DAATA EDITIONS and how it holds new models for artist commissioning, distribution and exhibition.

From the Conference: Video Art Distribution in Stuttgart 2018

https://lisa.gerda-henkel-stiftung.de/daata_editions_and_new_models_for_artist_commissioning_distribution_and_exhibition?nav_id=7964

http://daata-editions.com

 

Phillips and Daata Editions Announce Partnership to Commission Artists

In artnet, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Digital, digital art, megan newcombe, Phillips, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 09/02/2019 at 10:54 am
Puck Verkade - Lucy Live 4

Image: Puck VerkadeLUCY LIVE, Courtesy of the artist and Daata Editions

Phillips and Daata Editions Announce Partnership to Commission Digital Artists

Works to be Exhibited at Phillips in New York and Sold Through Daata Editions Online Platform

PRESS RELEASE

8 FEBRUARY 2019 – Daata Editions and Phillips are delighted to announce a partnership this spring leading to the commissioning and exhibition of two new digital artworks. The recipients will comprise of artists with practices that include video, sound, and performance. The commissioned artworks will premiere and be exhibited at Phillips in April, alongside a selection of other works by Daata artists, after which they will be offered for sale through daata-editions.com.

Founded in 2015, Daata provides a simplest way to discover and collect digital artworks, serving as a native platform to a new generation of artists working with moving image and sound. The works by both emerging and leading contemporary artists can be downloaded at any time on any screen or device.

Artnet News: Is There a Market for Digital Art? Phillips Is Partnering With Daata Editions to Find Out

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David Gryn, Founder of Daata Editions, said, “Since its founding, Daata has supported artists working in digital media through the commissioning of new artworks. We are delighted to work with Phillips on this initiative, which aims to empower collectors in understanding the potential value of artworks made via digital media, as well as showcase artists who are disrupting the field through their unique vision and innovation.”

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Megan Newcome, Phillips’ Director of Digital Strategy, said, “The partnership with Daata is an exciting opportunity for Phillips to continue to support the digital artist community while empowering collectors to see the potential in acquiring non-object based artworks that have historically been considered complicated to own.”

There will be a strong educational component to the partnership, with panel discussions that will aim to explore new technologies and new distribution models that are making this field of collecting increasingly viable.

The two artists who will receive these commissions will be announced in March.

ABOUT DAATA EDITIONS

Daata Editions commissions artist video, sound, poetry, and web and is acknowledged worldwide as a leading platform for commissioning and exhibiting digital artworks, working with both emerging and established artists. Daata Editions launched in May 2015 presenting works by 18 artists. Available as limited editions, Daata now has 350+ artworks by 80 artists that can be viewed and acquired as digital downloads through the website. Daata Editions artworks form part of the Hammer Museum Contemporary Collection, US; the Julia Stoschek Collection, Germany; KIASMA, Finland and the Zabludowicz Collection, UK. Upcoming Daata collaborations include Phillips, MOCAD Detroit and NeueHouse, New York.

For more information visit https://daata-editions.com/

ABOUT PHILLIPS

Phillips is a leading global platform for buying and selling 20th and 21st century art and design. With dedicated expertise in the areas of 20th Century and Contemporary Art, Design, Photographs, Editions, Watches, and Jewellery, Phillips offers professional services and advice on all aspects of collecting. Auctions and exhibitions are held at salerooms in New York, London, Geneva, and Hong Kong, while clients are further served through representative offices based throughout Europe, the United States and Asia. Phillips also offers an online auction platform accessible anywhere in the world. In addition to providing selling and buying opportunities through auction, Phillips brokers private sales and offers assistance with appraisals, valuations, and other financial services.

Visit www.phillips.com for further information.

Artnet News: Is There a Market for Digital Art? Phillips Is Partnering With Daata Editions to Find Out

Please find the full Phillips Press Release attached and follow link to Press Images

PRESS CONTACTS:

Anna Mustonen, Daata Editions

anna@daata-editions.com +44 7738098931

Jaime Israni, Senior Public Relations Specialist, Phillips

jisrani@phillips.com +1 212 940 1398

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Aalto and Daata present Animal Charms

In Aalto, Aalto University, Animal Charms, Art Video, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Finland, Helsinki, Jakob Kudsk Steensen, Ollie Dook, Puck Verkade, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 17/12/2018 at 9:11 pm

 

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Aalto Studios and Daata Editions are excited to announce their first collaborative exhibition taking place in January 2019.

ANIMAL CHARMS consists of newly commissioned artworks by Ollie Dook, Jakob Kudsk Steensen and Puck Verkade recently presented at NADA Miami during the Art Basel Miami Beach week of events.

Aalto Studios Gallery, Otakaari 7, 0210 Espoo, Finland

Exhibition: 17 January – 15 February 2019
Private View: 16 January 2019 5-7pm

More information coming soon!

https://daata-editions.com/

Image: Puck Verkade, LUCY LIVE, courtesy of the artist and Daata Editions

The artwork is a digital file, yes by Pau Waelder – a new Foreword for Daata Editions

In Art Basel, Art Video, Collecting, Collector, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, NADA, Pau Waelder, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 16/11/2018 at 11:26 am

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The artwork is a digital file, yes

by Pau Waelder

A new Foreword for Daata Editions

When considering how to collect digital art, we come across two preconceptions: what an artwork must be and what digital files are worth. First, it is commonly assumed that an artwork is an object with unique attributes, original, and irreplaceable. The object routinely goes from the artist’s studio to the gallery, where it is acquired by a collector. There is no doubt that it is always the same object that trades hands, and it is finally the collector who decides where the artwork is placed and who has access to it. Conceptual and performance art has challenged this notion again and again, but the artwork always finds its way into the market and the collector’s home in the form of a more or less stable object. Thus, if an artwork (a) is not an object, (b) can be copied, (c) can be accessed or experienced beyond the control of its owner(s), and/or (c) requires a computer, software and display to be at all perceivable, some may find it “difficult,” “challenging,” or even not worth collecting. This relates to the second preconception.

Our computers, tablets and smartphones are constantly storing digital files. Most of them we have created ourselves, others we have downloaded for free or for a fee. They fill the device’s storage space and force us to either copy them to other devices, store them in the cloud or delete them. Digital files are therefore constantly moved around, copied and erased, both a necessity and a burden. In most cases, we don’t know what to do with them, they just linger in folders and hidden directories until detected by a cleanup app or simply obliterated when the device that stores them reaches the end of its service life. Digital files, therefore, tend to be considered expendable in the sense that there should always be another copy somewhere. In fact, a growing segment of the entertainment industry relies on selling access to content on digital files that we temporarily store in our devices and swiftly remove when we are done watching the film, tv series, or documentary; listening to the song or podcast; reading the book, graphic novel or magazine. Many times, the file is not even downloaded, it is streamed and thus disappears the moment it is not used anymore, without leaving a trace. When we pay for the content, we either rely on it being safely stored by the provider and always conveniently accessible or we just want to experience it and never care what happens to it afterwards, because there will always be more, newer content ready to be clicked on.

My point is that artworks and digital files seem to be incompatible, due to how we tend to conceive artworks and our daily experience with digital files. Artworks are forever, digital files are ephemeral. Artworks are unique objects, digital files are immaterial worthless copies. However, an artwork does not need to be an object. In fact, a painting is not an object, it is an image that becomes a physical object because the pigment needs to be placed on a surface and canvases make it easier than walls to create, move around and sell the images. An artwork created in a digital format (a video, sound, jpeg, gif, 3D animation, browser-based piece or what have you) is not only always a copy but also the result of a software interpreting a file on a certain display, so every time it is experienced it turns out to be, in a way, a unique performance. Of course, one has to make sure that the software works with the file and that the display shows the piece as intended, but that’s all part of the artwork being something other than a static, physical object –which would nevertheless require certain conditions of placement, lighting, humidity and so forth. Finally, the artwork may be available to others even if it is safely at home and a certificate of authenticity, kept in the safe, states that no one else owns it. Artworks have a life of their own as they are viewed in exhibitions, reproduced in photographs and videos, distributed in magazines, books and blogs. Most of the art we know and love, we have never owned and will never own – even big collectors know and love much more art than they have bought. A large part of that art we have seen through reproductions, mostly on screens. It is still part of us, and for those who were lucky, smart or powerful enough to buy it, the more people who feel that the artwork is part of them, the better. For what good is it to own something that no one else knows about, that none can appreciate, that cannot be shared?

Digital art allows us to own and at the same time share an artwork – not only its reproduction. This can raise some eyebrows and insecurities. It may be argued that if the artwork is available elsewhere or that it can be copied, it loses its value. However, in addition to what I have already stated about the nature of a digital file, let us consider what Nelson Goodman found to be the difference between an original artwork and a forgery: its history of production. A digital artwork that has been purchased from a reputable source with a valid registry of authenticity has a history of production that can be established from the artist to the collector. No matter how many copies of the artwork may circulate, only the collector – or collectors if the artwork is editioned– can claim ownership and, more importantly, become part of the history of the artwork. This is not just provenance, which will matter to the next owner, but an active involvement in the existence of the artwork, its relevance and also in supporting the work of the artist. This is where Daata Editions comes in. Daata commissions art that is sold through its online platform in limited editions. The artists are paid to produce artworks that anyone can buy with a few clicks. The buyer can download the artwork and store it in her computer, on the cloud, wherever, make copies and display them on any device she owns. The rest of us can see the same artwork – watermarked – on the platform, appreciate it, maybe feel the urge to own it too. But we won’t be part of the artwork’s history, only those who bought it do. And those who are lucky or smart enough get the first edition.

Pau Waelder is a curator, writer and researcher whose work focuses on contemporary art and new media.

https://daata-editions.com/

Rebel Souls – A Trailer

In Art Fair, Art Rio, ArtRio, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Max Reinhardt, MIRA, Rebel Souls, Sound, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 26/09/2018 at 2:51 am

 

Rebel souls image

Rebel Souls

curated by David Gryn & Max Reinhardt

MIRA at Art Rio, 26-30 September 2018

TRAILER https://vimeo.com/291832957

Rebel Souls is the artists video and sound program for MIRA at Art Rio, curated by David Gryn, Daata Editions with sonic accompaniment from Max Reinhardt, musician, DJ and presenter of BBC Radio 3’s Late Junction.

Rebel Souls used as its artwork selection inspiration – artworks, sounds and ideas that emanated from the rebellious and radical zones of the 1970’s – from the discordant sounds and vision of the Female Punk Artists and the rhythms, anthems and spirit of Tropicalia. Like previous projects in Moscow, Miami and London, the Gryn and Reinhardt collaboration takes the form of an artist’s moving image curated compilation, using the music and sound within the artworks as a catalyst for developing a soundscape filled with music and sonic interventions that reflects on the selected artist video program.

http://artrio.art.br/mira

Artists: Adriano Motto, Alison O’Daniel, Anna Costa e Silva, Annie Bielski, Ayrson Heráclito, Bárbara Wagner & Benjamin de Burca, BasicaTV, Dora Longo Bahia, Felipe Cama, Fernando Velazquez, Gabriela Mureb, Gina Birch, Guy Oliver, Iain Forsyth & Jane Pollard, Igor Vidor, Kim Gordon, Kota Ezawa, Jeremy Couillard, Laleh Khorramian, Lenora de Barros, Maria Laet, Matt Stokes, Puck Verkade, Rä di Martino, Rosie Carr, Rosie McGinn, Thiago Martins de Melo, Thora Dolven Balke, Tin Ojeda, Tromarama, X Ray Spex

Galleries include: 303 Gallery, A Gentil Carioca / Galeria Marilia Razuk, Anita Schwartz Galeria / Millan, Cavalo, Central Galeria, Copperfield London, Daata Editions, Dürst Britt & Mayhew, Edouard Malingue, Fortes D’Aloia & Gabriel, Galeria Movimento, Kate MacGarry, Luciana Caravello Arte Contemporânea, September Gallery, Shulamit Nazarian, Galeria Superfície, UV, Vermelho, Workplace Gallery, yours mine & ours, Zipper.

Trailer/&sound by Jacob Gryn​
Image: Jeremy Couillard
http://daata-editions.com

Phillip Birch – New Commission on Daata Editions – Office Shadow

In Art Basel, Art Video, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Lyles & King, Office Shadow, Phillip Birch, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 11/06/2018 at 12:46 pm

Office-Shadow-3 (Sisyphus Rock)

Daata Editions are excited to announce the release of Phillip Birch’s new commissioned artworks titled Office-Shadow (Personas). Birch has produced six short films that take place on a single floor of a computer generated office building. Each video acts as a single chapter of a longer narrative which is told through the point of view of a first person perspective.

Using this perspective, Birch (b. 1978, Detroit) is utilizing the language of video game design which allows the viewer to project themselves into the space as if they are themself the protagonist. The videos draw on Jungian psychology, the mundanity of office work, the visuals of Role Playing Games and the language of Greek mythology to create a world that is at once familiar and unfamiliar.

Birch is represented by Lyles & King and his recent solo exhibitions and performances include Milespires and Reliquaries, Lyles & King, NY; Entering God Mode, Jack Hanley, NY; The Crown of Modernity, 47 Canal, NY; The Hand of God, Essex Flowers, NY; The Chair After Its Method of Implementation, Cleopatra’s, NY.

TRAILER

Saya Woolfalk – All the colours of a rainbow

In Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Fair, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, digital art, Expo Chicago, POSTmatter, Saya Woolfalk, Uncategorized, Video Art, wetransfer on 15/09/2016 at 8:40 am

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ALL THE COLOURS OF THE RAINBOW

by POSTmatter Editors | September 7, 2016

A CONVERSATION WITH SAYA WOOLFALK ON CULTURAL MIXES, UTOPIA AND HER NEW COLLABORATION WITH DAATA EDITIONS AND POSTMATTER. “I AM DEEPLY INTERESTED IN PLAY AND THE POSSIBILITIES THAT EMERGE THROUGH PROCESSES AND I TRY TO BRING TOGETHER THINGS THAT MAY NOT GENERALLY BE FUSED TOGETHER”

Saya Woolfalk is a New York-based, Japanese-born interdisciplinary artist. Using science fiction, fantasy, anthropology and semiotics, she explores the alternative utopian possibilities of identity. Melding dance, video, animation and sculpture in a number of ongoing projects, she offers fantastical narratives of cultural hybridity to expand traditional visions of the present and ideas of the future.
In a recent public performance piece that took over New York’s Fulton Centre, she paired performance with interactive app technology to offer passers by a glimpse into her kaleidoscopic imagination. It is one in a series of pieces that builds the story of the Empathics, a fictional race of women who Woolfalk is writing as unbound by the limits of genetics.
In collaboration with Daata Editions, we preview one artwork from Woolfalk’s upcoming 2016 series Color Mixing Machine. In it, she continues to build the story of the Empathics through ritualistic digital creations that reimagine what it means to be human. The full set of artworks will run in POSTmatter from 29th September, and are available to buy on Daata Editions, an innovative digital platform representing contemporary moving image and sound artists. Our preview and interview with Woolfalk is presented in association with WeTransfer.

PM: What is the mission of your fictional future female species, the Emphatics, and the space they inhabit, ‘No Place’?
SW: ‘No Place’ is a project I worked on from 2006 to 2008 with filmmaker and anthropologist Rachel Lears. The No Placeans are plant humans from the future who change gender and colour, transform into the landscape when they die, and repurpose refuse into usable technologies. The Empathics are people in the present who establish something called the Institute of Empathy (IoE) to study No Place. The IoE encounters a grouping of No Placean bones and fungus on the bones stimulates their physiological mutation and cultural transformation. This mutation allows the Empathics to easily cross species by integrating foreign genetic material into their DNA.

PM: From performance to digital to textile, your art practice includes a comprehensive range of materials, forms and processes. What is your process for developing new multimedia pieces?
SW: I usually start with an idea, which changes as I make the physical work. I create drawings, mock-ups and digital renderings and then create physical prototypes. Both the mock ups and prototypes are edited as I go along. Many are discarded or stored as parts for future projects. I constantly move through multiple media and I work simultaneously in many.

PM: What is it about the history of craft as a practice that appeals to you and how do you see it as remaining prominent in a time when analogue methods are being outpaced by automation?
SW: I was taught by feminists at Brown University, and the work done at Judy Chicago and Miriam Schapiro’s Womanhouse was incredibly influential for me when I began making my own work. The students who created that project reimagined and reconstructed a home to integrate alternative logics into its structure. Their use of craft based practices to transform the domestic appealed to me as a kitchen table way of making art that could address larger social issues.
I also use many digitally methods to produce work. I have created augmented reality garments, digital video and animation, as well as vinyl wall papers printed from vectorised files. However, I try to maintain a relationship to the handmade by using original hand-printed artworks and collages as the raw material for the creation of the work.

PM: Can you discuss the notions of hybridity that feature in your work?
SW: I am deeply interested in play and the possibilities that emerge through processes and I try to bring together things that may not generally be fused together. When I started working on the Empathics project, I was inspired by the dual notion of a chimera. A chimera is both an imaginary female monster with disparate parts, and a scientific term for a genetic organism composed of two or more genetically distinct tissues—for example, partly male and partly female. This is one of my entry points into thinking about hybridity.

PM: What is your personal relationship with religion and spirituality, and how has it influenced your work?
SW: Many of the forms I use evoke the religious and spiritual. I do this to set a tone for my audience, so they have a sense that they are entering a state of liminality. My own life is relatively secular, although I was raised Catholic on my father’s side and Buddhist on my mother’s.

PM: It feels as if you are envisioning a model for a future that prioritises indigenous belief-systems, the female, digital innovation and harmony. This stands out as optimistic at a time when futuristic visions are so often grey, mechanic and dystopian. Is your commitment to a sense of joy, communion and hope a deliberate choice or natural occurrence for you when making work?
SW: The Empathics were conceptualised as a group of humans who became incredibly receptive to the introduction of foreign genetic material. I wanted to explore how morphology and culture are mutable through contact and creolisation. As I make work, I explore narratives that offer my audience a sense that there may be positive solutions for our often-dystopian visions of the future. I would say that yes, I make a deliberate choice to offer a sense of hope.

This interview is published in partnership with WeTransfer, as part of our series exploring the creatives who push the boundaries between digital and physical space in new and surprising ways. See Saya Woolfalk’s work custom moving image piece on WeTransfer here.
The six works from ‘Color Mixing Machine’ are now Online at Daata Editions, in association with POSTmatter, and are now available to buy online. Daata will be exhibiting a specially created artwork by Saya as part of the project at Expo Chicago, in conjunction with this POSTmatter and Daata Editions collaboration.

Saya is represented by Leslie Tonkonow Gallery NYC

Daata Editions et l’art de demain

In Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Fair, Asialyst, Brussels, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Digital, digital art, Independent, Jeff Koons, New York Times, Uncategorized, Video Art on 17/04/2016 at 10:37 am

Daat new flyer image pink April 2016

Franck Barthelemy feature on Daata Editions in Asialyst.

From the New York Times Conference: Art for Tomorrow in Doha, Qatar, March 2016. Posted to celebrate Daata Editions participation in the inaugural Independent Brussels April 2016.

La dernière conférence du New York Times Art for Tomorrow s’est tenue à Doha (Qatar) en mars dernier.
Le thème choisi pour 2016 n’est pas banal, même à Doha, une ville qui se projette sans complexe dans le XXIème siècle : Technology, Creativity and the City. Des intervenants prestigieux du monde des arts et au delà du monde de l’urbanisme ont échangé idées et arguments avec passion, parfois confusion.
Parmi elles, Charles Landry, HE Sheikha Al Mayassa, Wim Pijbes, Aric Chen, Jean Nouvel, David Gryn, Jeff Koons, Marina Abramovic et plusieurs dizaines d’autres.
J’ai particulièrement apprécié les débats sur l’art et l’internet, qu’il s’agisse d’accès, d’appréciation ou de modalité de vente.
Les partisans de l’art qu’on doit voir « en vrai » et ceux de l’art qu’on peut voir sur un écran se sont affrontés avec diplomatie pour aboutir à un dialogue du type anciens contre modernes.

Je crois que ce débat est persistant dans un monde où les technologies ne cessent d’évoluer.
Je crois aussi qu’il est inutile.
Il y aura toujours des amateurs de musées réels et des amateurs de musées virtuels.
Il y aura sans doute d’autres formes de « lieux » d’expositions dans les années à venir.
Et surtout, il y a déjà et il y aura encore de nouvelles formes d’art, des formes que les artistes inventent en fonction des technologies disponibles.

Je crois que le débat doit s’ouvrir à ces nouvelles formes d’art.
Par exemple, un son. Comment le fait-on entendre ? Dans le circuit des galeries ? Pas facile ! Quel prix attribuer à un son ? Comment l’artiste développeur de son peut-il vivre de son œuvre ? Comment distribuer un son ? Comment stocker un son ? On peut se poser les mêmes questions pour une succession d’images animées de 3 secondes par exemple. Ou encore, une vidéo de 1.5 minute.

L’initiative de David Gryn, un commissaire américain (le créateur de Film à Art Basel Miami Beach depuis 2011), spécialiste d’images animées, m’est apparue à cet égard remarquable.
Gryn a créé l’an dernier Daata Editions, une plateforme internet dédiée aux images animées, aux sons et aux courtes vidéos. Depuis plusieurs années, il se demandait comment promouvoir et développer un public pour les artistes qui produisent des images animées et des sons que l’on trouve parfois gratuitement sur internet sur les sites des artistes, et plus généralement nulle part excepté dans quelques musées ou des collections très spécialisés.

Sur ses propres fonds et initialement soutenu (grâce à la pratique du seed funding) par la collectionneuse et philanthrope Anita Zabludowicz, Gryn a conçu un site internet pour distribuer des images animées et des sons.
Son point de départ : comment aider ces artistes qui utilisent des supports multimédia que l’on n’expose pas dans les galeries et en conséquence qui sont peu vendus.
S’ils sont peu vendus, ils sont peu connus et n’ont donc aucune chance d’accéder à un large public.

Gryn propose en ligne des « saisons » qu’il commissionne à des artistes qu’il connaît personnellement ou qui lui sont recommandés.
Il fait son travail de commissaire et sélectionne quelques artistes. Il produit l’œuvre de l’artiste et l’achète.
Il propose ensuite de vendre sur la plateforme internet une édition de 15 en général. Pour chaque vente, l’artiste touche une royaltie.

La première « saison » a présenté le travail de 18 artistes, spécialement conçu pour être vendu sur la plateforme.
A peu près 300 œuvres ont été vendues en ligne à un peu de moins de 100 clients.
Le prix d’une œuvre varie de quelques centaines à quelques milliers de dollars.

Le site n’est pas une galerie en ligne mais une plateforme de distribution.
Chaque artiste est montré de la même façon. Personne n’est mis en avant.
L’acheteur potentiel doit faire un choix parmi les artistes de la saison en cours. Il doit être actif et exercer son sens critique pour passer à l’acte d’achat.
L’acheteur doit trouver les images, le son ou la vidéo qu’il veut, qu’il recherche ou tout simplement qui l’interpellera.
Au bout du compte, il se retrouvera avec un fichier sur son ordinateur qu’il appréciera seul, qu’il partagera avec des amis, qu’il mettra peut-être en scène chez lui.

Gryn n’a pas l’intention d’attirer sur la plateforme les fonds d’investissement qui font et défont les cotes des artistes contemporains.
Il partage naïvement avec d’autres collectionneurs ce qu’il trouve bon et intéressant, parfois avec l’aide d’autres experts ou amateurs de son entourage. Gryn construit un écosystème pour soutenir de nouvelles formes d’art immatérielles.
Pour le moment, Dataa Editions est une petite start-up qui emploie une personne à mi-temps.
Compte tenu de l’évolution constante des formes d’art et des technologies pour les réaliser, je peux aisément imaginer que la petite start-up deviendra grande.

En fait, le succès de l’entreprise de David Gryn a peu d’importance.
Il ouvre une réflexion sur la distribution des œuvres d’art, matérielles et immatérielles. Il nous propose d’imaginer de nouvelles voies, de nouveaux écosystèmes pour soutenir la création.
Les conversations de Doha ont porté davantage sur les lieux et les infrastructures pour accueillir la création.
Peut-être que l’an prochain, pourraient- elles porter sur les nouvelles formes d’art dans la citée et les nouveaux écosystèmes pour les encourager ?

Franck Barthelemy
Diplomé de l’EDHEC, Franck rejoint d’abord le corps diplomatique comme attaché commercial auprès de l’ambassade de France de Bombay en 1993. Il a depuis quitté la diplomatie pour le monde des affaires mais il n’a jamais perdu sa passion pour l’Inde ; passion qui l’a conduit a développer un nouveau modèle de développement pour les ONG indiennes. L’art n’étant jamais très loin, il est depuis 2009, consultant et découvreur de talents artistiques pour collectionneurs.

Article in Asialyst

https://asialyst.com/fr/2016/04/12/daata-editions-et-lart-de-demain/

Film at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2015 – Our Hidden Futures

In Art Basel, Art Fair, artists, Artprojx, Chloe Wise, Claire Christerson, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Film, Moving Image, Sound, Video Art on 24/10/2015 at 10:16 am
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Chloe Wise & Claire Christerson, Greece, 2015, 3′, courtesy of the artists

Our Hidden Futures

Film: Art Basel announces 2015 program for Miami Beach

Curated by David Gryn, Daata Editions and Artprojx

Film Trailer

– ART BASEL PRESS RELEASE MIAMI BEACH | OCTOBER 23 | 2015

From December 2 through 6, 2015, Art Basel will present a premier program of over 50 films and videos by and about artists selected under the title ‘Our Hidden Futures’. Screened on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, the program is again curated by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions and London’s Artprojx.

First-time Art Basel film curator Marian Masone, Senior Programming Advisor at the Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York has selected the feature-length film ‘Troublemakers – The Story of Land Art’ (2015) by filmmaker James Crump for a special screening at the Colony Theatre on Friday, December 4.

Gryn’s program of film and video works, drawn from the show’s participating galleries, will include work by Ida Applebroog, Anna Barham, Breda Beban, Janet Biggs, Sue de Beer, Rineke Dijkstra, Tracey Emin, Barbara Hammer, Shirazeh Houshiary, Jaki Irvine, Anna K.E. & Florian Meisenberg, Jumana Manna, Howardena Pindell, Cauleen Smith, Catherine Sullivan, and Marnie Weber.

Every evening, in addition to the Film program, sound works by Sofie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker and Camille Norment will be presented on the state-of-the arts surround sound system in SoundScape Park, curated by David Gryn. In conjunction with the outdoor film screenings, over 80 works have been selected to be shown within a designated Film Library at the Art Basel fair, whose Lead Partner is UBS.

Returning for his fifth year with Art Basel, curator David Gryn’s selection of works for Film will explore the history and future path of moving image artworks. Framed under the title ‘Our Hidden Futures’, the lineup will highlight an international selection of emerging and established artists, encompassing a range of moving image works that illustrate the breadth of these various analogue and digital mediums.

On Saturday, December 5 at 2pm, Art Basel’s Salon program will feature ‘The Artists
Surround Sound Project’ a talk between Art Basel film curator David Gryn and the artists
Sophie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker and Camille Norment. Art Basel
entry tickets include admission to the Salon.

For the full list of films featured at Art Basel in Miami Beach in 2015, please visit artbasel.com/miami-beach/film

– GENERAL INFORMATION

Daily (December 2 – 6)

Miami Beach Convention Center Film Library

In conjunction with the outdoor program, over 80 selected works will be presented on six touch-screen monitors within the Film Library at Art Basel’s show during show hours. Access with a show entrance ticket.

Nightly (December 2 – 5)

SoundScape Park Evening Film Program

Outdoor screenings will take place in SoundScape Park on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, a three-minute walk from the Miami Beach Convention Center. Admission to Film at SoundScape Park is free. Visitors are encouraged to bring blankets and lawn chairs.

Every evening from 6pm to the start of the first film screening, sound works by different artists, curated by David Gryn, will be presented in SoundScape Park: Weds, Dec 2: Mariele Neudecker / Thurs, Dec 3:  Sofie Alsbo / Fri, Dec 4: Camille Norment / Sat, Dec 5: Alice Jacobs. Free public access, seating is limited – bring a blanket or lawn chair.

– 2015 FILM PROGRAM

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

6pm | Sound work

Mariele Neudecker, Figure of 8 (Rainforest, Ecuador, sound recorded at height: 1.39m, 9.78m, 22.59m, 30.79m and 37.26m), 2015, Galerie Barbara Thumm

8pm | Short Film program | Fairy Doll

Running time approximately 58’; selected by David Gryn

The 2015 Film program will open with a selection of short works in which artists focus on a single portrait to draw out the nuances of what it means to be human.

Rineke Dijkstra, Marianna (The Fairy Doll), 2014, 19’13”, Marian Goodman Gallery

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle, The Countermand, 2014, 9’48”, Jenkins Johnson Gallery

Carla Chaim, Lua Certa, 2011, 1’03”, Galeria Raquel Arnaud

Anna K.E. & Florian Meisenberg, Late Checkout (Part II), 2015, 9’58”, Simone Subal Gallery

Anna Maria Maiolino, Um Momento, Por Favor, 1999/2004, 4’30”, Hauser & Wirth

Howardena Pindell, Free, White and 21, 1980, 12’15”, Garth Greenan Gallery

9pm | Short Film program | Speak Easy

Running time approximately 78’; selected by David Gryn

‘Speak Easy’ will consider the artistic use of the creative, the audience, and the allure of the arena, the theater and the theatrical to explore the unsaid or unsayable.

Simone Leigh & Liz Magic Laser with Alicia Hall Moran, Breakdown, 2011, 9’46”, Tilton Gallery

Jumana Manna, A Sketch of Manners (Alfred Roch’s Last Masquerade), 2013, 12′, CRG Gallery

JoAnn Verburg, Watching Trisha Brown, 2015, 2’40”, Pace/MacGill Gallery

Melanie Smith with Rafael Ortega, Aztec Stadium. Malleable Deed, 2010, 10’29”, Sicardi Gallery

Marinella Senatore, Speak Easy, 2009, 15′, Peres Projects

Catherine Sullivan, Triangle of Need (Olympian and Doves), 2007, 8’22”, Metro Pictures

Ann-Sofi Sidén in collaboration with Jonathan Bepler, Curtain Callers, 2011, 20′, Galerie Barbara Thumm

Thursday, December 3, 2015

6pm | Sound work

Sofie Alsbo, Close Encounter, 2015, , courtesy of the artist

9pm | Afterward Via Fantasia

Catherine Sullivan with George Lewis and Sean Griffin, Afterword via Fantasia, 2015, 60ʹ, Metro Pictures

Catherine Sullivan’s film, ‘Afterword Via Fantasia’, is conceived within the framework of an opera written by composer George Lewis and co-directed by Sullivan and longtime collaborator Sean Griffin. Sullivan transposes material from Lewis’s libretto into a series of scenes shot on sets for other plays with parallel and divergent social and cultural themes. The opera and film are based on Lewis’s widely-acclaimed book A Power Stronger Than Itself: The AACM (Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians) and American Experimental Music. The AACM has long played a key role in American experimental music, forging new models of black identity and social activism.

10pm | Short Film program | Sea of Silence

Running time approximately 56’; selected by David Gryn

Works within ‘Sea of Silence’ reflect on the poetic silence of the absent and, in so doing, create a louder and much more visceral language.

Marnie Weber, Sea of Silence, 2009, 14’15”, Gavlak Gallery / Simon Lee Gallery

Camille Henrot, Million Dollars Point, 2011, 5’35”, Galerie König / kamel mennour

Shirazeh Houshiary, Dust, 2011-2013, 7’08”, Lehmann Maupin

Cauleen Smith, Crow Requiem, 2015, 11′, Corbett vs. Dempsey

Minnette Vári, Quake, 2007, 6’23”, Goodman Gallery

Tracey Emin, Love Never Wanted Me, 2013, 2’48”, Lehmann Maupin

Nikki S. Lee, Yours, 2015, 8’41”, One and J. Gallery

Friday, December 4

6pm | Sound work

Camille Norment, Toll – Dissonant Image, (Re-mixed and mastered from 2011 version of Toll), 2015, courtesy of the artist

8pm | Short Film program | Duet

Running time approximately 45’; selected by David Gryn

‘Duet’ will present artworks that embody pairs, the split screen, duos and unions, which are found in the style of the film, the artistic process or within the narrative.

Janet Biggs, Duet, 2010, 6’47”, Cristin Tierney Gallery

Zanele Muholi, Ayanda & Nhlanhla Moremi’s Wedding, 2013, 11’50”, Stevenson

Nicola Thomas, S-time, 2015, 3’53”, courtesy of the artist

Talia Chetrit, Parents, 2014, 9’44, Sies + Höke, kaufmann repetto

Nicola Thomas, Julian in two parts, 2015 2’02”, courtesy of the artist

Sue de Beer, The Blue Lenses, 2014, 19’03”, Marianne Boesky Gallery

9pm | Short Film program | Snow Job

Running time approximately 62’; selected by David Gryn

Selected works in ‘Snow Job’ use satire to communicate messages that engage and humor us.

Berna Reale, Cantando na Chuva (Singing in the Rain), 2014, 4’15”, Galeria Nara Roesler

Shana Moulton, MindPlace ThoughtStream, 2014, 11’57”, Galerie Gregor Staiger

Mary Reid Kelley, Camel Toe, 2008, 1’25”, Pilar Corrias

Barbara Hammer, Snow Job: The Media Hysteria of Aids, 1986, 7’44”, KOW

Diana Thater, Male Gyr-Peregrine Falcon (Grim), 2012, 30”, Hauser & Wirth

Chloe Wise & Claire Christerson, Greece, 2015, 3′, courtesy of the artists

Ida Applebroog, It’s No Use Alberto, 1978, 9’36”, Hauser & Wirth

Breda Beban, Jason’s Dream, 1997, 10′, courtesy of the artist’s estate & Kalfayan Galleries

Mary Reid Kelley, Swinburne’s Pasiphae, 2014, 8’58’, Pilar Corrias

Judith Hopf, Lily´s Laptop, 2013, 5’29”, kaufmann repetto

8:30 pm | James Crump, Troublemakers – The Story of Land Art, 2015

Special Film Screening at Colony Theatre, 1040 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach

Running time 72ʹ; selected by Marian Masone

Troublemakers – The Story of Land Art, 2015 unearths the history of land art in the tumultuous late 1960s and early 1970s. Focused on a cadre of renegade New York artists that sought to transcend the limitations of painting and sculpture by producing earthworks on a monumental scale in the desolate desert spaces of the American southwest, the film includes rare footage and interviews with artists such as Robert Smithson (Spiral Jetty), Walter De Maria (The Lightning Field) and Michael Heizer (Double Negative). The screening is followed by a panel discussion between the movie’s Director James Crump and Art Basel Film co-curator Marian Masone.

Saturday, December 5, 2015

6pm | Sound work

Alice JacobsThe Intent I Owe, 2015, courtesy of the artist

8pm | Short Film program | Vanishing Point 

Running time approximately 58’; selected by David Gryn

‘Vanishing Point’ will feature a selection of artworks which employ kinetic and choreographed movement to investigate the factory, machines, and the futility of war, as well as the demise of manufacturing and its consequences.

Breda Beban, Let’s call it love, 2000, 7’30’’, artist’s estate, Kalfayan Galleries

María Fernanda Cardoso, On the Origins of Art: Maratus Volans, Male and Female, Artists, 2015, 3’13”, Casas Riegner

Janet Biggs, Vanishing Point, 2009, 10’32”, Cristin Tierney Gallery

Fritzia Irizar, Sin título (requiem JMAF), 2015, 4’19”, Arredondo \ Arozarena

Suzanne Harris, The Wheels / Flying Machine, 1973, 5’47”, Rhona Hoffman Gallery

Anna Barham, The squid that hid, 2015, 5’05”, Galerie Nordenhake

Guan Xiao, Hidden Track, 2015, 4’51”, Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler

Susanne M. Winterling, Immersion Vertex (Prototyp Diadem), 2’22”, 2014, Jessica Silverman Gallery

Pia Camil, No A Trio A, 2013, 7’31”, OMR

Cornelia Parker, War Machine, 2015, 9’25”, courtesy of the artist and Frith Street Gallery

9pm | Bikini Carwash

Running time approximately 52’; selected by David Gryn

The seven works in this program will explore the great outdoors, capturing urban and rural encounters.

Liz Cohen, Bikini Carwash, 2002, 5’58”, Salon 94

Marnie Weber, Songs Hurt Me, 1994, 2′, Gavlak Gallery / Simon Lee Gallery

Jaki Irvine, Se Compra: Sin é, 2014, 17’37”, Kerlin Gallery

Micol Assaël, Overstrain, 2012, 3′, ZERO…

Kristin Oppenheim, Ultramarine, 2015, 7’43”, in collaboration with Don Maclean, 303 Gallery

Cauleen Smith, H-E-L-L-O, 2014, 11′, Corbett vs. Dempsey

Milena Bonilla, Ceremony for a Homogeneous Landscape, 2009, 2’34”, mor charpentier

RELATED LINKS

New World Symphony https://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/art-basel-at-soundscape-park/

Artlyst http://www.artlyst.com/articles/art-basel-announces-2015-film-programme-for-miami-beach-fair

ARTnews http://www.artnews.com/2015/10/23/art-basel-miami-beach-2015-announces-film-program/

Artlyst on Talks program http://www.artlyst.com/articles/artists-and-art-professionals-lead-talks-programme-at-art-basel-miami-2015

Buro on Nikki S. Lee http://www.buro247.sg/culture/news/art-basel-2015-program-for-miami-beach.html

– NOTES TO EDITORS

About the Curators

David Gryn

David Gryn is the founder and director of Daata Editions, a new online platform commissioning artists video, sound and web editioned artworks and director of London’s Artprojx, screening, curating, promoting and lecturing on artists’ moving image and other art projects, working with leading contemporary artists, art galleries, museums, art fairs, art schools and film festivals worldwide.

Marian Masone

Marian Masone is a film curator, lecturer and writer based in New York. For over 20 years Masone has worked at The Film Society of Lincoln Center, America’s pre-eminent film organization. She sits on the selection committees for two of The Film Society’s most prestigious festivals: ‘The New York Film Festival’ and ‘New Directors/New Films’, a co-production with the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Masone has been a guest lecturer and curator for leading institutions such as Parsons School of Design in New York and Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid. Her writings on film and media have appeared in many leading newspapers and magazines.

About Art Basel

Art Basel stages the world’s premier art shows for Modern and contemporary works, sited in Basel, Miami Beach and Hong Kong. Defined by its host city and region, each show is unique, which is reflected in its participating galleries, artworks presented, and the content of parallel programming produced in collaboration with local institutions for each edition. In addition to ambitious stands featuring leading galleries from around the world, each show’s exhibition sectors spotlight the latest developments in the visual arts, offering visitors new ideas, new inspiration and new contacts in the art world.

Partners

UBS, global Lead Partner of Art Basel, has supported the organization for more than 20 years. As Art Basel’s global network has expanded, so too has UBS’s commitment and lead partnership, which includes all three shows in Basel, Miami Beach and Hong Kong. In addition to its support of Art Basel, UBS has a long and substantial record of engagement in contemporary art: as a holder of one of the world’s most distinguished corporate art collections, as an active partner in global contemporary art projects such as the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, and as a source of information and insights through the UBS Art Competence Center, UBS Arts Forum and its new contemporary art news-focused app, ‘Planet Art’.

Associate Partners Davidoff, the prestigious Swiss cigar brand, Audemars Piguet, the independent high-end watch manufacturer, and NetJets, the world leader in private aviation, support Art Basel across its three shows. Art Basel’s Media Partners are The Financial Times and the Miami Herald, and the VIP car service at the show is by BMW. Long-standing partner AXA ART, the international art insurance specialist, provides VIP guided tours at all shows. For further information on Art Basel’s partners, please visit artbasel.com/partners.

Important Dates for Media

Private View
Wednesday, December 2, 2015, 11am to 8pm (by invitation only)

Vernissage
Thursday, December 3, 2015, 11am to 3pm (by invitation only)

Public Days
Thursday, December 3, 2015, 3pm to 8pm
Friday, December 4, 2015, 12noon to 8pm
Saturday, December 5, 2015, 12noon to 8pm
Sunday, December 6, 2015, 12noon to 6pm

Upcoming Art Basel shows
Hong Kong, March 24 – 26, 2016
Basel, June 16 – 19, 2016

Press accreditation
Online registration for press accreditation is now open and will close on November 13, 2015. Please visit artbasel.com/accreditation.

Media information online

Media information and images can be downloaded directly from artbasel.com/press.

For the latest updates on Art Basel, visit artbasel.com, find us on Facebook at facebook.com/artbasel
or follow @artbasel on Instagram, Google+, Twitter, Weibo and Wechat.

Press Contacts

Art Basel, Dorothee Dines

Tel. +41 58 206 27 06, press@artbasel.com

PR Representatives for North and South America and the Middle East

Fitz & Co., Katrina Weber Ashour

Tel. +1 212 627 1653, katrina@fitzandco.com

PR Representatives for Florida

Garber & Goodman, Robert Goodman

Tel. +1 305 674 12 92, FLrepresentative@artbasel.com

PR Representatives for Europe

Sutton, Sarah Norton

Tel. +44 20 7183 3577, sarah@suttonpr.com

PR Representatives for Asia

Sutton, Erica Siu

Tel. +852 2528 0792, erica@suttonprasia.com

Interviews from Yale University Radio WYBCX by Brainard Carey

In Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, artists, Artprojx, Artworld, Brainard Carey, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, digital art, Interviews, Moving Image, Video Art, WYBCX, Yale, Yale University, Yale University Radio on 13/07/2015 at 6:21 pm

cropped-wybcxhires-1

Interviews from Yale University Radio WYBCX

Conversations with artists, writers, curators and more – about art and the art world as we know it.

Hosted by Brainard Carey

Quite a few names here:

G. Roger Denson
Kathy Battista
Buzz Spector
Connie Butler
Rob Garrett
Brian Buttler
Sans façon
Uta Kögelsberger
Steve Katz
Jack Sal
Michael Workman
Colin Westerbeck
Susan Silas
Paula Hayes
Bruno Leitão
Lee Boroson
David Gryn
Helen Molesworth
Nils Norman
Heidi Voet
Khosro Adibi
Adam Moskowitz
Emily Cheng
Christian Siekmeier
Regine Basha
Conor Fields
Chris Verene
Barry N. Neuman
Barbara A. MacAdam
Jason Middlebrook
Shaheen Merali
Jennifer Parker
Cristiana de Marchi
Kevin Clarke
Dotty Attie
Simone Battisti
Céline Condorelli
Rachael Gorchov
Bérénice Reynaud
Stephan Balleux
Warren Neidich
Saul Melman
Sue Stoffel
Michael Steinberg
Liz Rosenfeld
Bonnie Marranca
Karim Noureldin
Tim Sullivan
Allard van Hoorn
Joseph Nechvatal
Christian L. Frock
Siona Benjamin
Toni Kleinlercher
Stephan Pascher
Anton Kern
Catarina Leitão
Ramesch Daha
Nancy Chaikin
Elena Cologni
Jacob Fabricius
Stephen Lack
Richard West
Steven Rand
Laura F. Gibellini
Valerie Sonnenthal
Mary Mattingly
Suzanne Landau
Ilya Budraitskis
Ofri Cnaani
Matthew Rose
Christina McPhee
Chris Wilder
Stefan Bruggeman
Jelle Bouwhuis
Robert Storr
Anuradha Vikram
Jason Yates
Derek Boshier
Rainer Judd
Ingrid Bachmann
Cora Cohen
Roger Herman
Michelle Grabner
Susan Leopold
Diane Lewis
Flora Fairbairn
RaúI Zamudio
Ben Mills
Carla Camacho
Giuliana Bruno
Brett Littman
Jeff Talman
Maurizio Bortolotti
Chiemi Karasawa
Alejandro Zaera-Polo
Joe Davis
Lawrence R. Rinder
Dane Jensen
Jorge Pardo
David Balzer
Laurie Rosenwald
Marlen Suyapa Bodden
Erwin Redl
Rafal Niemojewski
Douglas I. Sheer
Elizabeth Dunbar
Bill Arning
Rachel Cook
Rebecca Belmore
Rui Amaral
Gaëtane Verna
Duane Michals
Joyce Kozloff
Ann Landi
Jo-Anne McArthur
Heather Nicol
Lara Almarcegui
Pacita Abad Art Estate / Interview with Jack Garrity
Katrin Sigurdardottir
Tyler Barstow
Barbara Rachko
Mira Schor
Deborah Kass
Nancy Spector
Vicki DaSilva
Michael David
Gary Lucas
Susan Sollins
Dave Hardy
Erin Shirreff
Jenna Lash
Karyn Olivier
Judy Glantzman
Betty Cuningham
Barry Schwabsky
Lawrence Weiner
Barbara Gallucci
Ida Applebroog
Stanley Casselman
Todd Levin
David Hickey
Jennifer Steinkamp
Adam Putnam
Richard Klein
Ann Lauterbach
Linda Yablonsky
Tamar Ettun
Derek Larson
Jo Nigoghossian
Ken Lum
Eve Andree Laramee
Carol Snow
Robert Taplin
Ester Partegas
Joan Snyder
Sheri Pasquarella
Raphael Rubinstein
Kimsooja
Brooke Kamin Rapaport
Marie Lorenz
Annette Lemieux
Nancy Princenthal
Christoph Heinrich
Gregory Volk
Robin Hill
Nina Katchadourian
WIlliam Pope L.
Chrissie Iles
Jen Durbin
Lisa Hoke
Rick Beerhorst
Arthur Danto (from 2011)
Barbra Drizin
Rita Reed
Katrina Mayer
Peter Ragnar
Grace Graupe Pillard
Sid Limitz
Paul Miller, aka DJ Spooky
John Currin
Mary Ceruti, Sculpture Center
Sarah Thornton
Catya Plate
Fred Wilson
Spencer Tunick
David Batchelor
Tom Sachs
Mary Heilman
Marilyn Mintner
Gregory Crewdson
Grayson Cox
David Wolfe, Raw food nutritionist
Ken Aronson, (hell.com)
Daniel Salin
Nato Thompson
Dan Cameron
Shamim Momin
David Ross
Abbey Ryan
Laura Hoptman