David Gryn blog

Posts Tagged ‘AV-arkki’

Notes for Bytes for Sale – Talk in Helsinki

In Bytes for Sale, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Digital, digital art, Helsinki, Kiasma, Uncategorized on 09/11/2018 at 5:24 pm
Screenshot 2018-11-06 at 10.58.04.png

Ollie Dook, Animal Stories, Daata Editions

 

Bytes for Sale

A talk by

David Gryn, Daata Editions

At Kiasma, Helsinki

Organised by AV-arkki http://www.av-arkki.fi/

Daata – what is it:

Daata is a commissioning platform ostensibly for artists who work with digital mediums, primarily video and sound. It exhibits and distributes online and shows the work world wide in collaboration with art fairs, galleries and museums. We have over 70 artists online and over 400 artworks.

Daata emerged from my many years focussing on showing artists moving image in the context of the cinema and leading art fairs worldwide – and realising that more needed to be done to support artists and to galvanise a somewhat reticent market place. It is designed as ‘a’ model, hopefully one of many and its aims are to be empowering (to artists, the medium, audiences etc).

https://daata-editions.com/

This talk can be summed up in two words:

PAY ARTISTS

But I was asked to speak for 40 minutes so here goes:

Is there a digital art market – in a nutshell ‘no’, but below – I will elaborate.

Community, Collaboration, Chemistries

It is a people business

I have seen many people come and go – since setting up Daata.

But the people who really care about empowerment, mutual support and collaboration survive.

Many people approach Daata to collaborate. They want to rub shoulders with the ‘cool’, with digital. They also often want Free content.

They have a unique business plan to raise millions and make billions from a dot com or major retail enterprise.

The collaborators often want us to promote their wares – but not much or nothing in return.

These are not community builders.

It is time for comprehensive unity.

This isn’t really a new thought. As I have been doing something like this for almost 20 years. Starting off with mostly analogue materials, and over time transmogrifying into digital process.

I have always dwelled on how to increase the audience/market position and the profile of digital media and this is definitely not new to me.

I have observed that the use and display of analogue or digital media at international art fairs has declined – where now you will see almost none. This is due to the fact that the the art market does not know what to do with digital media, how to sell or display digital media.

The irony is that most artists touch on digital media. Most galleries sell via digital platforms. Most museums and galleries and artists communicate via digital marketing and information.

They update their systems every so often and redesign and so on. But when you talk to Museums about collecting digital media – they are fearful, controlling, and nervous about how to protect, display, archive, sustain digital media over the next 100 years.

My simple logic is always – if I gave a Museum a Picasso or indeed a shredded Banksy – they will find a way to do all the above. Because they value it and believe in its extrinsic and intrinsic worth. 10 years ago I would not have been having the same regular conversations about VR/AR/Blockchain – but somehow the museum wants the understanding of longevity with digital mediums that absolutely no one else can know or control. 

There are those who are artists, gallerist, curators, collectors and they often purport to being really interested in collaborating – but when it gets down to it – they are mostly interested (either buy necessity or by design) in rubbing shoulders with the wealthy, the big art brands, the big sponsors, the famous artists, the big dinners etc

In working with Art Fairs over many years – I have seen a trait. They want to work with me/us to empower the medium, galleries and artists and always start off on a really great moral crusade/position. Then when it gets nearer to the actual fair – there is a lot of forgetting and not bothering that goes on. Reason: it isn’t the main feature, it doesn’t bring revenue, and audience may not connect. Art fairs missions are get galleries to pay and wealthy audiences in to buy and general public to buy tickets.

A market thrives on competition and mutual interdependence of the many. And we need to face a different joined-up approach to create audience interest and market power.

Artist relationships and support

It is a very human business and my role is to find best outcomes for the artist and those that support them too. This works best when we all collaborate best. The artists who are a delight to work with are those that you continue to work with and that works both ways. Bad reputations stick.

Control, dominance and power:

Those with hyper success and market dominance do well and survive – but that is the very extreme – the names we all know – not all artists, curators, gallerists are cut out to run multi national corporations.

Entities entering the digital space want this, the archaic market place wants this, it is a barrier to greater influence.

This is the way: so many entities want to be the market leader or power broker or in fact – there is only one solution and it is there’s. This occurs time and again with individuals saying they have the ultimate technology, the ultimate contract, the ultimate methods … it is strange that when it get to technology so many people want to have the dominant solution that we should all use.

Bizarrely the entities that say they have the ultimate contract (as an example) don’t share their contract templates, same with technologies that we should all use. In tech circles open-source is common – in art circles the sharing gene diminishes radically.

The niche collector. Sometime the video art collector is a quirk – it delineates an art form, but gives them niche power as the ‘video art collector’. Just Be an art collector, with something like a leading interest in tech mediums.

The issue with internet and digital media – is that it has its own history of market dominance, hyper valuations, ambitions to become one of the multi billion dollar elite businesses (google, facebook, amazon etc etc). However the art world does not work according to norms of business. I have watched some companies shoot for the stars and go out of business – whilst others can survive – based on their aspirations being artworld realistic.

Dedication, longevity, passion and commitment:

I believe my 30+ year duration in working in an area of limited financial reward is based on my integrity to deliver the best projects for limited resources. I have reaped recognition from years of experience and focus. This is based on my unswerving passion and commitment to make a difference in much the same way an artists has to make artworks regardless of the final sale/exhibition. My reputation is always my last project.

technology, delivery, simplicity

Making projects happen is what I have been doing. However, the value in complex set ups is hard to achieve a return. So my work uses ready made/existing materials/equipment/online/Internet/cinema and deliver usually in single screen/single file formats.

Promotion, marketing of projects:

Fence sitting doesn’t work. If you agree to work with an artist, or be in a fair, or organise anything. Give it your all. There is no value to engaging with what you are doing. There is no one else will promote your project or work as well as you. Or usually no one else promotes that which they opt to collaborate with. Which is very strange.

Solutions:

-More competition.

-Clusters of digital entities teaming up along lines of art fair models.

-marketing investment

-create ideal situations (whatever that means

-Pay artists. It provides trusted integrity to the people we purport to support.

-true collaborations

-create ‘a’ model not ‘the’ model. Semantics are key.

-Find your confidence

-Help nurture confidence

-Social-ist

-Not Capital-ist

-Don’t aim to dominate – but to collaborate

-Contracts are only any value if all parties benefit from the agreement.

We revert back to the human experience. Thru this we aim to build support systems for artists, ways to enhance the audience experience and look for best outcomes for all and conversely we strive to avoid avarice and corruption, which is an inevitable consequence of aims at huge profit and market dominance.

My model is to pay artists and/or look out for best outcomes for them. To keep a company light and limit its overheads.

My discussions with all future partners is – team up by paying artists and you have a deal.

The big collectors, collections understand the eco system and treat artists and galleries with reverence

How does he see the international art world developing and the role of galleries for digital media art in the future?

Fantasy world idea:

Museums and galleries shall usurp the art fairs and auction houses in terms of perceived dominance. The market can be led by the integrity of those who’s mission is to best serve art. To have the dominance the other way around – means that art is driven by its market powers and not its true intrinsic value of the quality of the aesthetics. To think that a Banksy artwork is of great value because of how it is sold at an auction – is indicative of the current demise we are in – but this also means that we can learn from this an react positively by shifting the focus from auction house shenanigans to museum/gallery.

I have worked with art fairs and auction houses – because they have become the dominant focus and attention for art events and exhibition – the one stop shops for audience to see much at the same time. Easy, sometimes lazy, economic rationale, it hitherto works (for some – usually the big players).

The art fair does not mean that art shown is the best – it means it is the work that is most likely to sell.

This logic – means that digital art mediums have incrementally reduced their visibility at art fairs over the years – till now there is almost none. Art fair costs are higher and the cost/income ratio has reduced – therefore the risk factor of tricky art mediums to sell are too high.

Galleries have to reclaim control of the art market from the auction house and art fair or those entities have to give back the power – by admitting that they (the galleries) have the most interest in supporting the role of the artist. The gallery business model is from selecting, exhibiting, selling and distributing the best artists. The art fair interest is to invite Galleries and audiences who pay money to be there. The auction house has no integral interest in supporting the gallery system as it predominantly benefits from the secondary market.

We need the experts of art/artist organisers, bright curators, facilitators – who’s interest is chiefly the support and promotion of artists.

The future:

Galleries and museums (and art fairs and such like): to treat digital mediums in equal terms to all other mediums.

The value of the ephemeral:

The future will be the age of the ephemeral/near-invisible art object – the digital file. The music, gamer and film industries understand the value of the download, the online link/file. Their value is in the potential volume of audience. Hitherto the artworld has never had this potential audience, as the contemporary audience is niche, and its strength has often been based on the rarity of the object and the value is centred on a very small wealthy elite audience. But our work is to either achieve the audience of those other art forms or utilise elements of it and evolve solutions to earn revenue and reward artists.

I personally don’t believe in (excessive) ownership and have always deeply valued music, dance and performances. I can pay 99c for a track of music that I value equally to any multi million dollar artwork.

I end as I began. There is only one way to work and engage with artists and that is:

PAY ARTISTS

I have to add a proviso – that this is not always possible due to restricted budgets – but if it is an aim – then it comes across and is fairly obvious to the arts community. If you can’t pay – find the best way to enable and empower artists to benefit from you working with them.

https://daata-editions.com/

 

Artprojx Cinema at SVA Theatre – two nights March 9-10

In A Grammar for Listening, All Divided Selves, Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, AV-arkki, David Gryn, Erkka Nissinen, Liisa Lounila, New York, Pilvi Takala, SVA Theatre, The Armory Show, Timo Vaittinen, VOLTA NY on 09/03/2012 at 1:21 pm

ARTPROJX CINEMA PRESENTS at the SVA THEATRE, NEW YORK 2012

The Modern Institute and Artprojx Cinema presents :
A Grammar for Listening (Parts 1 – 3) 8.30pm 16mm film created in collaboration with sound artists Lee Patterson, Toshiya Tsunoda and composer Éric La Casa.

& All Divided Selves 9.30pm.

by Luke Fowler.
Friday March 9.

&

Artprojx Cinema & AV-arkki, The Distribution Centre For Finnish Media Art presents :
“Mystery Show” – featuring Four Finnish Artists: Liisa Lounila, Erkka Nissinen, Pilvi Takala, Timo Vaittinen
Saturday March 10 at 7pm and 8pm.
Program lasts 45 minutes (played twice). Followed by a tasty reception and meet the artists.
Supported by the Consulate General of Finland in New York, The Finnish Cultural Institute in New York and The Finnish Cultural Foundation.

at

SVA Theatre, 333 West 23rd Street (between 8th and 9th Avenues), New York, NY 10011.
ENTRY IS FREE. RSVP artprojxcinema@gmail.com and bring guests.

More details and event information:
ARTPROJX www.artprojx.com
DAVID GRYN davidgryn.wordpress.com
THE MODERN INSTITUTE www.themoderninstitute.com
INDEPENDENT www.independentnewyork.com/
AV-ARKKI www.av-arkki.fi

ARTPROJX CINEMA on FACEBOOK

RSVP for FREE TICKETS Artprojx Cinema at SVA Theatre New York March 9-10

In A Grammar for Listening, All Divided Selves, Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, AV-arkki, David Gryn, Erkka Nissinen, Film, Liisa Lounila, Luke Fowler, New York, Pilvi Takala, SVA Theatre, The Armory Show, The Modern Institute, Timo Vaittinen, Video Art on 04/03/2012 at 1:10 pm

ARTPROJX CINEMA PRESENTS at the SVA THEATRE, NEW YORK 2012

The Modern Institute and Artprojx Cinema presents :
A Grammar for Listening (Parts 1 – 3) 8.30pm & All Divided Selves 9.30pm.
by Luke Fowler.
Friday March 9.

&

Artprojx Cinema & AV-arkki, The Distribution Centre For Finnish Media Art presents :
“Mystery Show” – featuring Four Finnish Artists: Liisa Lounila, Erkka Nissinen, Pilvi Takala, Timo Vaittinen
Saturday March 10 at 7pm and 8pm.
Program lasts 45 minutes (played twice). Followed by a tasty reception and meet the artists.
Supported by the Consulate General of Finland in New York, The Finnish Cultural Institute in New York and The Finnish Cultural Foundation.

at

SVA Theatre, 333 West 23rd Street (between 8th and 9th Avenues), New York, NY 10011.
ENTRY IS FREE. RSVP artprojxcinema@gmail.com to reserve your seat and confirm which screening/s you prefer.

More details and event information:
ARTPROJX www.artprojx.com
DAVID GRYN davidgryn.wordpress.com
THE MODERN INSTITUTE www.themoderninstitute.com
INDEPENDENT www.independentnewyork.com/
AV-ARKKI www.av-arkki.fi

ARTPROJX CINEMA on FACEBOOK

SPREAD THE WORD !

STRAIGHT TO VIDEO http://straighttovideo.org/2012/02/artprojx-cinema-presents-luke-fowler-and-mystery-show-at-sva-theatre-nyc/

ALL EVENTS IN NEW YORK http://allevents.in/new%20york/Artprojx-Cinema-at-SVA-Theatre-New-York-2012/387609651265201

RHIZOME – LUKE FOWLER http://rhizome.org/announce/events/58097/view/

RHIZOME – MYSTERY SHOW http://rhizome.org/announce/events/58098/view/

FINLAND http://www.finland.org/Public/default.aspx?contentid=243519&nodeid=35833&culture=en-US

Artprojx Cinema and AV-arkki presents Mystery Show feat. Liisa Lounila, Erkka Nissinen, Pilvi Takala, Timo Vaittinen – at SVA Theatre March 10

In Art, Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, AV-arkki, Chelsea, Erkka Nissinen, Film and Video, Liisa Lounila, New York, Pilvi Takala, SVA Theatre, Timo Vaittinen, Video Art on 28/02/2012 at 3:01 pm

ARTPROJX CINEMA at the SVA THEATRE, NEW YORK 2012

Saturday March 10 at 7pm and 8pm

Artprojx Cinema & AV-arkki, The Distribution Centre For Finnish Media Art presents

“Mystery Show”

Featuring Four Finnish Artists:

Liisa Lounila, Erkka Nissinen, Pilvi Takala, Timo Vaittinen
program 45 minutes (played twice) – followed by a reception and meet the artists

Supported by the Consulate General of Finland in New York, The Finnish Cultural Institute in New York and The Finnish Cultural Foundation.

at

SVA Theatre, 333 West 23rd Street (between 8th and 9th Avenues), New York, NY 10011
ENTRY IS FREE. RSVP artprojxcinema@gmail.com to reserve your seat and confirm which screening/s you prefer.
http://www.artprojx.com

Program:

Liisa Lounila: PLAY>> (2003)

Timo Vaittinen: In Da Club (2006)

Erkka Nissinen: Rigid Regime (2011)

Timo Vaittinen: Central Park (2012)

Pilvi Takala: Broad Sense (2012)

Liisa Lounila: GIG (2007)

Pilvi Takala: Players (2010)

Timo Vaittinen: Mystery Show (2007)

Artist info:

Liisa Lounila

(born 1976 in Finland) lives and works in Helsinki. She gained an MFA from Academy of Fine Arts in 2005 in Helsinki. Lounila has exhibited nationally and internationally, including at the 8th Istanbul Biennale; Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt; MAXXI, Rome; and Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma, Helsinki. She represented Finland at the 50th Venice Biennale. Lounila is currently in residency at the ISCP in New York. Her works are also featured at VOLTA NY 2012. Lounila’s main mediums are experimental film/video, photography and painting. Her works usually deal with an obscure need for change, great expectations and places of potential. Usually her pictures, both still and moving, have their background in movies, yellow papers, lifestyle magazines and pop lyrics.

Erkka Nissinen

(born 1975 in Finland) lives and works between Helsinki, Hong Kong and Amsterdam. He studied in The Slade School of Fine Art in London and gained an MFA degree from the Academy of Fine Arts in 2001 in Helsinki. He went to Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten residency in Amsterdam in 2007. His works have been exhibited internationally, latest solo exhibitions at Ellen de Bruijne Project Space in Amsterdam, Smart Projects Space in Amsterdam, Helsinki City Art Museum’s Kluuvin Gallery and 1646 in Den Haag. He won the acclaimed Illy Prize during 2011 Rotterdam Art Fair. His latest work Rigid Regime (2011) was selected to the international competition of the Rotterdam Film Festival 2012. Erkka combines acting in an actual studio with simplified computer animations within his videos. His videos are characterized by absurdity, humor and deliberate clumsiness.

Pilvi Takala

(born 1980 in Finland) currently lives and works in Amsterdam. She received an MFA from The Academy of Fine Arts in Helsinki in 2006. She went to Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten residency in Amsterdam in 2009-10. Takala’s works have been shown in museums and film festivals worldwide. She was awarded Prix de Rome 2011 for the work Broad Sense, of which a screening version will be included in the program. Her works are narratives based on site-specific interventions and actions, sort of exceptions in everyday life. The actions aim to reveal and question unwritten rules and shared truths of the specific social setting in a subtle way. The actual artworks produced based on the actions are mostly videos, but also photographs and publications.

Timo Vaittinen

(born 1976 in Finland) lives and works in Helsinki. He has studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Helsinki and gained an MFA in 2007. Vaittinen’s works have been recently shown in Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art in Helsinki, Living Art Museum in Reykjavik, A.L.I.C.E. gallery in Brussels and Helsinki Art Museum. His latest latest solo show was held in Pori Art Museum in Finland. Timo Vaittinen works with collage and painting and turns this mixture into a moving, spatial animation. He likes to play around with the polarities of analog and digital, import painterly approaches to producing videos and confuse the material appearances of paintings.

AV-arkki

is the Distribution Centre for Finnish Media Art. AV-arkki’s main purpose is to distribute and promote Finnish media art to festivals, events, museums and galleries worldwide. AV-arkki has been a pioneering distributor for over 23 years and has opened up opportunities for artists to get their works recognized internationally. The activities of AV-arkki have contributed to the success that Finnish media art enjoys today. These activities are unique in both Finland and the other Nordic countries. http://www.av-arkki.fi

Artprojx promotes and screens artist’s film and video programs in the context of the cinema. Working in collaboration with galleries, artists, art museums and art fairs. Artprojx has worked with Art Basel Miami Beach, Frieze, ICA, Tate, Whitney Museum, Sadie Coles HQ, Gavin Brown enterprise, Gagosian, White Cube, Hauser & Wirth, Victoria Miro Gallery and many more leading international contemporary art galleries, art fairs and artists. http://www.artprojx.com https://davidgryn.wordpress.com

More Links

Mystery Show – Facebook link

http://www.facebook.com/events/247402388675388/

Artprojx at SVA Facebook link

http://www.facebook.com/events/387609651265201/

Artprojx Cinema facebook page

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Artprojx-Cinema/158768007533698

FAD website

http://www.fadwebsite.com/2012/02/29/artprojx-presents-luke-fowler-and-mystery-show-feat-four-finnish-artists-sva-theatre-ny-march-9-10/

Artist at Large

http://www.artist-at-large.com/2012/02/27/artprojx-cinema-presents-at-the-sva-theatre-new-york-2012/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+artist-at-large+%28artist-at-large%29

Artprojx website

http://artprojx.com/lukefowlerandavarkki.html

Artprojx Cinema at SVA Theatre New York 9-10 March 2012

In Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, AV-arkki, David Gryn, Film and Video, Finland, Independent, Luke Fowler, New York, SVA Theatre, The Modern Institute, Timo Vaittinen, Video Art on 18/02/2012 at 10:52 am

ARTPROJX CINEMA PRESENTS
AT SVA THEATRE, NEW YORK

Friday 9 March 2012 at 8.30pm and 9.30pm
In association with The Modern Institute
A Grammar for Listening (Parts 1 – 3) & All Divided Selves by Luke Fowler

&

Saturday 10 March 2012 at 7pm and 8pm
In association with AV-arkki, The Distribution Centre For Finnish Media Art
“Mystery Show” – featuring Four Finnish Artists:
Liisa Lounila, Erkka Nissinen, Pilvi Takala, Timo Vaittinen
program 45 minutes (played twice)

at

SVA Theatre, 333 West 23rd Street (between 8th and 9th Avenues), New York, NY 10011
ENTRY IS FREE. RSVP artprojxcinema@gmail.com to reserve your seat. Mention which event and time you plan to attend.
Contact: David Gryn at david@artprojx.com and +447711127848 www.artprojx.com

MORE DETAILS:

The Modern Institute and Artprojx Cinema presents
Luke Fowler
Friday 9 March 2012 at 8.30pm and 9.30pm

A Grammar for Listening (Parts 1 – 3) 8.30pm
Silence dominated the experimental film of the 1960s. Sound or musical accompaniment was often dismissed as illustrative, manipulative or redundant. Instead, a return to experiments of early cinema concentrated on rhythm, structure and material and thereby considered film’s potential as a unique art form with its own grammar.

Prior to this tendency in film, composer John Cage had foregrounded silence within his 1953 composition ‘4’33’. Purging concerts of conventional musical content, he allowed the sounds from outside to come inside and become the focus of the audience’s attention.

These foundational ideas have led to a burgeoning music scene focused on environmental sound and field recording. Outlining some of the complexities between film and sound, Luke Fowler’s film cycle ‘A Grammar for Listening (parts 1-3)’ attempts to confront these contradictions through the possibilities afforded by 16mm film and digital sound recording devices. These three films, created in collaboration with sound artists Lee Patterson and Toshiya Tsunoda and composer Éric La Casa respectively, provide a series of collaborations and meditations on the issues raised, and propose a number of tentative navigations through.

All Divided Selves 9.30pm
The social and cultural revolutions of the 1960s were spearheaded by the charismatic, guru-like figure of Glasgow born psychiatrist R.D. Laing. In his now classic text ‘The Politics of Experience’ (1967), Laing argued that normality entailed adjusting ourselves to the mystification of an alienating and depersonalizing world. Thus, those society labels as ‘mentally ill’ are in fact ‘hyper-sane’ travelers, conducting an inner voyage through aeonic time. The film concentrates on archival representations of Laing and his colleagues as they struggled to acknowledge the importance of considering social environment and disturbed interaction in institutions as significant factors in the aetiology of human distress and suffering.

All Divided Selves reprises the vacillating responses to these radical views and the less forgiving responses to Laing’s latter career shift from well-recognized psychiatrist to celebrity poet. A dense, engaging and lyrical collage — Fowler weaves archival material with his own filmic observations — marrying a dynamic soundtrack of field recordings with recorded music by Éric La Casa, Jean-Luc Guionnet and Alasdair Roberts.

Luke Fowler
Luke Fowler (b. 1978) is an artist, filmmaker and musician based in Glasgow. His films, a collage of found footage and Fowler’s own recordings, have documented the work of British counter cultural figures including Scottish psychiatrist R. D. Laing and composer Cornelius Cardew. Through his collaboration with experimental musicians Toshia Tsunoda, Lee Patterson and Eric la Casa, he creates dynamic soundtracks of original compositions and field recordings for these works.

His new feature-length film ‘All Divided Selves’ is the third work to take up the legacy of radical psychiatrist R.D. Laing. It concentrates on archival representations of Laing and his colleagues as they struggled to acknowledge the importance of considering social environment as significant factors in human distress and suffering. The film premiered at Anthology Film Archive in New York in November 2011 and has been screened as part of the Berlin Film Festival this year.

The Modern Institute will be making a solo presentation of Luke’s new photographic prints at the Independent Fair in New York in March. His recent solo exhibitions include Inverleith House, Edinburgh; ‘All Divided Selves’, CCS Bard Galleries, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York; Serpentine Gallery, London; ‘A Grammar For Listening’, The Modern Institute, Glasgow; and ‘Warriors’, X Initiative, New York; Kunsthaus Zürich, Zürich. Forthcoming solo exhibitions include ‘The Poor Stockinger’ at The Hepworth, Wakefield. He participated in ‘Cornelius Cardew and the Freedom of Listening’, CAC Bretigny; ‘British Art Show 7: In The Days Of The Comet’, Nottingham Contemporary, Nottingham and The Hayward Gallery, London; ‘Radical Nature’, Barbican Art Gallery, London; ‘The Associates’, DCA, Dundee; ‘What You See is Where You’re At’, The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh; Kunsthaus Zürich, Zürich; and ‘Younger than Jesus’, New Museum, New York; In 2008 he received the inaugural Derek Jarman Award.

The Modern Institute
The Modern Institute has been described by Art Review as ‘a model for galleries around the world’. Since its foundation in 1998 it has played an important role in putting Glasgow on the world art map through its association with some of the most important names in contemporary art. The gallery represents 38 artists who are regularly exhibiting internationally in museums and institutions. These include four Turner Prize winners; Martin Boyce (2011), Richard Wright (2009), Simon Starling (2005), Jeremy Deller (2004) and two further nominees; Cathy Wilkes (2008) and Jim Lambie (2005). Several of the artists have exhibited at the Venice Biennale, with Martin Boyce representing Scotland with a solo presentation in 2009.

Artists represented include: Dirk Bell, Martin Boyce, Jeremy Deller, Alex Dordoy, Urs Fischer, Kim Fisher, Luke Fowler, Henrik Håkansson, Mark Handforth, Georg Herold, Thomas Houseago, Richard Hughes, Chris Johanson, Andrew Kerr, Jim Lambie, Duncan MacQuarrie, Victoria Morton, Scott Myles, Nicolas Party, Toby Paterson, Simon Periton, Manfred Pernice, Mary Redmond, Anselm Reyle, Eva Rothschild, Monika Sosnowska, Simon Starling, Katja Strunz, Tony Swain, Spencer Sweeney, Joanne Tatham & Tom O’Sullivan, Padraig Timoney, Hayley Tompkins, Sue Tompkins, Cathy Wilkes, Michael Wilkinson, Gregor Wright, Richard Wright.

The Modern Institute: Luke Fowler Solo Presentation 3rd Floor, Independent, 548 West 22nd St, New York, NY 10011. March 8-11, 2012

MODERN INSTITUTE www.themoderninstitute.com
INDEPENDENT www.independentnewyork.com/

The Modern Institute: Luke Fowler Solo Presentation 3rd Floor, Independent, 548 West 22nd St, New York, NY 10011. March 8-11, 2012

MODERN INSTITUTE
www.themoderninstitute.com

INDEPENDENT
www.independentnewyork.com/

Artprojx Cinema & AV-arkki, The Distribution Centre For Finnish Media Art presents
“Mystery Show”
Four Finnish Artists: Liisa Lounila, Erkka Nissinen, Pilvi Takala, Timo Vaittinen
Saturday 10 March 2012 at 7pm and 8pm
followed by a reception with the artists

Liisa Lounila: PLAY>> (2003)
Timo Vaittinen: In Da Club (2006)
Erkka Nissinen: Rigid Regime (2011)
Timo Vaittinen: Central Park (2012)
Pilvi Takala: Broad Sense (2012)
Liisa Lounila: GIG (2007)
Pilvi Takala: Players (2010)
Timo Vaittinen: Mystery Show (2007)

Liisa Lounila
(born 1976 in Finland) lives and works in Helsinki. She gained an MFA from Academy of Fine Arts in 2005 in Helsinki. Lounila has exhibited nationally and internationally, including at the 8th Istanbul Biennale; Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt; MAXXI, Rome; and Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma, Helsinki. She represented Finland at the 50th Venice Biennale. Lounila is currently in residency at the ISCP in New York. Her works are also featured at VOLTA NY 2012. Lounila’s main mediums are experimental film/video, photography and painting. Her works usually deal with an obscure need for change, great expectations and places of potential. Usually her pictures, both still and moving, have their background in movies, yellow papers, lifestyle magazines and pop lyrics.

Erkka Nissinen
(Born 1975 in Finland) lives and works between Helsinki, Hong Kong and Amsterdam. He studied in The Slade School of Fine Art in London and gained an MFA degree from the Academy of Fine Arts in 2001 in Helsinki. He went to Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten residency in Amsterdam in 2007. His works have been exhibited internationally, latest solo exhibitions at Ellen de Bruijne Project Space in Amsterdam, Smart Projects Space in Amsterdam, Helsinki City Art Museum’s Kluuvin Gallery and 1646 in Den Haag. He won the acclaimed Illy Prize during 2011 Rotterdam Art Fair. His latest work Rigid Regime (2011) was selected to the international competition of the Rotterdam Film Festival 2012. Erkka combines acting in an actual studio with simplified computer animations within his videos. His videos are characterized by absurdity, humor and deliberate clumsiness.

Pilvi Takala
(born 1980 in Finland) currently lives and works in Amsterdam. She received an MFA from The Academy of Fine Arts in Helsinki in 2006. She went to Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten residency in Amsterdam in 2009-10. Takala’s works have been shown in museums and film festivals worldwide. She was awarded Prix de Rome 2011 for the work Broad Sense, of which a screening version will be included in the program. Her works are narratives based on site-specific interventions and actions, sort of exceptions in everyday life. The actions aim to reveal and question unwritten rules and shared truths of the specific social setting in a subtle way. The actual artworks produced based on the actions are mostly videos, but also photographs and publications.

Timo Vaittinen
(born 1976 in Finland) lives and works in Helsinki. He has studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Helsinki and gained an MFA in 2007. Vaittinen’s works have been recently shown in Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art in Helsinki, Living Art Museum in Reykjavik, A.L.I.C.E. gallery in Brussels and Helsinki Art Museum. His latest latest solo show was held in Pori Art Museum in Finland. Timo Vaittinen works with collage and painting and turns this mixture into a moving, spatial animation. He likes to play around with the polarities of analog and digital, import painterly approaches to producing videos and confuse the material appearances of paintings.

AV-arkki
AV-arkki is the Distribution Centre for Finnish Media Art. AV-arkki’s main purpose is to distribute and promote Finnish media art to festivals, events, museums and galleries worldwide. AV-arkki has been a pioneering distributor for over 23 years and has opened up opportunities for artists to get their works recognized internationally. The activities of AV-arkki have contributed to the success that Finnish media art enjoys today. These activities are unique in both Finland and the other Nordic countries.

Supported by the Consulate General of Finland in New York, The Finnish Cultural Institute in New York and The Finnish Cultural Foundation.

AV-arkki
www.av-arkki.fi

Facebook event page: http://www.facebook.com/events/247402388675388/

Artprojx Cinema

Artprojx is a leading brand that promotes and screens artist’s film and video programs generally in the context of the cinema. Working in collaboration with galleries, artists, art museums and art fairs. Artprojx has worked with Art Basel Miami Beach, Frieze, The Armory Show, ICA, Tate, Whitney Museum, Sadie Coles HQ, Salon 94, Gavin Brown enterprise, Gagosian, White Cube, Hauser & Wirth, Victoria Miro Gallery and many more leading international contemporary art galleries and artists. www.artprojx.com davidgryn.wordpress.com