David Gryn blog

Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

Innovating the Future of Film in the Art World – David Gryn interview with Amy Tam – I AM FILM

In Amy Tam, Art Film, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Film, I AM FILM, Uncategorized, Video on 15/03/2018 at 10:03 pm
03_Krispy Kreme

Elliot Dodd, The Doctor, 2018

David Gryn is the founding director of Daata Editions, which aims to empower artists working with digital mediums, including video, sound and web via commissioning moving image and sound artworks by leading international artists. He has been the curator of the Film and Sound program at Art Basel in Miami Beach—the largest art fair in the world—for the last seven years.

For the 2018 edition of Independent New York, Sound and Video exhibiting in New York from the 8th-11th March, Gryn was selected to curate a series of artist-created video and sound experiences. The collaboration between Independent and Spring Place featured works by a range of international artists exploring digital mediums, including; Larry Achiampong, Lynda Benglis, BREYER P-ORRIDGE, Keren Cytter, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, David Lynch, Laurel Nakadate, Puppies Puppies, Torbjørn Rødland, and Saya Woolfalk.

I AM FILM Founder and CEO, Amy Tam, interviewed David to discuss Daata Editions and its unique business model, that is successfully supporting and commissioning video artists within the art world.

David, how would you describe Daata Editions (Daata)?

DG: It’s an online marketplace for moving image and sound artworks. My goal is to grow the audience and awareness for this medium, while allowing prospective buyers to access the artworks at any time, from anywhere. Daata has more than 70 artists, with over 300 artworks commissioned for the platform, and all works are released entirely online. The platform works with both leading and emerging artist talents, prominent curators, writers, collectors, art fairs, art magazines, and various art world collaborators including; Amalia Ulman, Takeshi Murata, Tracey Emin, Chloe Wise, Jon Rafman, Rashaad Newsome and many more.

 

Why did you choose to create this type of platform?

DG: Although it’s changing, the art market still tends to prefer object-based artworks. There’s a sense of resistance in galleries, auction houses, and art fairs; to normalise the type of works Daata commissions, because it’s unclear how to make them as commercial as more traditional mediums. People recognise that the industry is moving in this direction and they talk about it, but they won’t engage with it in its current position.

I’m trying to treat it as normally as a painting or sculpture now, instead of waiting for the “right moment.” It’s easy to show digital artworks online, so I started Daata as an answer to that problem. It was about how to encourage all the players—the institutions, the curators, the collectors, the audiences—to treat it more seriously. To me, the solution was the possibility of pushing forward one version of a marketplace, like you might open up a gallery, but online. It is a new way of distributing and showing artists’ moving image, sound, and web-based work. I didn’t realise I was ahead of the curve until I set it up.

How would you explain the way the Daata business model works?

DG: We pay the artists up front and then we distribute the artworks at a price, and we sell the work and give the artist a royalty. It’s inherently structured as a self-sustaining economy. Currently, it’s still philanthropic in its process, and we pay all the artists. If we haven’t paid an artist, we have an equal royalty share.

The business model is effectively saying there’s a value to this work. I’ve realised, to my chagrin, that almost everyone who treats art seriously generally does so when there’s a price point. Art that is for free is very difficult to quantify for almost everybody—other than the artist. I really do value art that isn’t necessarily commercial. But with Daata, I am trying to put forward a case that you can actually “have your cake and eat it, too.” You can have this work viewed and seen for free, and you can also collect it, buy it, and have the HD version for you to play whenever and on whatever device.

Works start at 100-200 dollars, and they go up incrementally until the maximum price of around 6000 dollars, in the video section. This method encourages early purchase, and the longer a work is for sale, the more it grows in value. We’re not trying to set up an auction model, a resale model, or a celebrity artist model. No matter how prominent the artist, the value starts out pretty flat across all parts of the site.

“I can’t base our website on the most famous, most money-making artist, because then it will start becoming a website dominated by the market forces. I wanted to make it a website dominated by the artwork and the artist.”

If you get in early, you can buy major artists and future major artists at a low price, which is exciting. With Daata, we’ve established A model, not THE model. It’s just one way of doing it.

Do you think artists or gallerists (decision-makers) have more power in the sale of art today?

DG: The power of the art fair is dominant. It’s very tilted towards the market position of what pays and drives an art fair’s business model. Galleries are trying to take things into their own hands to change it, but it’s hard. The problem with the relationship with the auction house and the art fair is; it tilts it to top dollar profit, whereas, if you’re supporting all sorts of artists in your gallery business model, you’re interested in the artist and the outcomes—it’s not always about how much money each artist makes.

It’s about how you put that work into a museum and how you grow that artist’s career. That’s often the gallery’s investment—time and costs, and that’s shattered by the art fair model, with many art fairs happening almost every month. Some galleries don’t operate with a great brain anymore, because they have to keep reacting to the next art fairs. The art world needs to alter and turn on its axis better.

Do you think the resistance in the marketplace comes from insufficient demand for these types of works or from the entities controlling what’s available—like art fairs and galleries?

DG: I think it has to be treated as a central cornerstone of an art fair, not as a hidden away sideshow. In my role as Curator of Film & Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach, I work very closely with Art Basel to try and make showing artists moving image and sound, very large and dynamic—luckily, they understand the need to empower the medium.

How does Daata fit into this context?

DG: I think there needs to be many outlets like Daata who can put their resources into supporting artists who make work, and distribute it. I keep coming across entities who want to take over the world, and I just want to take over the project I’m doing and make it the best I possibly can, within finite boundaries and borders. I don’t see what I’m doing with Daata as better or hierarchical, I just see it as being part of an art world jigsaw puzzle.

What has the demand been like in terms of sales of works?

DG: It’s great, it just needs to be more. It’s currently more sales than I’ve ever made in my part of the art world before. But to actually get to a point where there is more revenue to pay the next round of artists and not needing seed funding, it’s still got a couple of years to go. I saw the first two to three years as building and positioning within the art world. I have conversations with certain collectors repeatedly, some people are buying anonymously. There have been some people starting to buy the work more regularly that I don’t know, and they’re coming back.

How has the artist response been in terms of outcomes for the artists commissioned?

DG: The brief for making the artwork is very open and aims to enable the artist to take risk and be experimental. They have said we’ve made them feel more like they’ve been able to try out new things, and that’s been a nice challenge for some artists. They’ve said it’s informed much of their next body of work. Many of them have been shown in artist exhibitions, galleries, museums and art fairs.

As a curator, how do you get introduced to artists?

DG: We don’t have applications. We’re aware of artists in the art world, because I get to see lot of new artists and artworks from art fair prospects, art galleries, artists and so on, and I always look. I also don’t know everything, so it’s also a lot of word of mouth. In the ecosystem of artists, curators, and collectors—we trust each other’s opinions. Not all artists are the right ones for this kind of project. It isn’t a platform for a Hollywood filmmaker to dabble in making an artwork, unless they consider themselves an artist and they’re in the artist/art world ecosystem. It isn’t a platform for all.

However, there’s always room for the quirky collaboration. I have just started distributing a virtual reality project, that is working with several artists to make a composite VR artwork with several different artists in it. We’re willing to take that risk with certain people and projects —as I need to dip my toe into unchartered territories sometimes, just to keep things fresh and open to new potentials.

What would you say have been the main challenges since you started Daata?

DG: My greatest challenge is creating an understanding that this is a very normal medium, and trying to communicate that. I would say everything is a challenge, so it’s exciting. That’s why I set this up—to make a difference within a medium. I try to have a balanced program between artists who are both males and females and across backgrounds. I think about that deeply, so it’s not just a trigger reaction process of signing up the artist who put their hands up first; that’s an easier and lazy way of operating in the art world.

In terms of unexpected positive outcomes, what have you learned in the last three years?

DG: There’s lots of positive things. I don’t see my work just about how great the outcomes are for me. It’s about a project that has the best outcomes for as many people in the process as possible, and that’s always been my interest. That’s where I’m happiest. I guess it’s like I’m always looking under the stone to see what’s there, to make things better. When I work with organisations as dominant as Art Basel, I still always look to see what could make them or my project better for all parties involved. The true and integrity driven people in the art world that I work with, understand collaboration and mutual support for each other. They realise that we’re in the same game together to enhance a better world for art world artists, audience activity, and cultural pursuit.

What is working or not working about the way things work in the film industry, and how is that in contrast or comparison to Daata?

DG: I see the artwork made by an artist as an artwork and the film work made by a filmmaker is a film work. I don’t see a hybridity and a way the two work together. I still say there are many great filmmakers who are great artists—but their art is making film, whereas, the artist makes artwork. An artist will generally make an artwork without a financial position and a filmmaker will probably not make a film unless it’s got funding.

However brilliant they are as filmmakers, a film doesn’t get made because of the costs of the production, whereas an artist can often make an artwork without anyone else involved. If you’re going to make an artwork, you’ve got to make it exist to be an artist. You can’t then call yourself an artist if you haven’t got an artwork. It just doesn’t add up.

In terms of how I work with artists in Daata: I commission based on the reputation of the artist and knowledge of their past work.

“I go into the process trusting the artist to deliver the artwork as they wish. I don’t need drawing boards and proposals, as I believe in the potential of the artist to make the best decisions for their work and aim for outcome that they demand of and for their work.”
I think there are so many filmmakers who are brilliant, and to cast doubt upon them for being an artist is wrong. Usually, I’d say they’re just a great filmmaker. There are just a few that go beyond just being a great filmmaker and I believe they are genuine artists. People like Andrei Tarkovsky, David Lynch, John Waters, and Sophia Coppola. Then, there are people who successfully cross mediums like Wim Wenders and Jim Jarmusch. Sometimes, the artist becomes the Hollywood filmmaker and can lose the strength of their moving image works as an artist. I think it’s hard once you have those budgets and the media spotlight to be the same brilliant artist. The value in an artist who works alone is often in the raw edges, the roughness and the idea generation. Once that dries out and is dominated by the sheen of wealth, it can lose the interest of the greater art world.

For further information on Daata Editions visit: http://daata-editions.com. You can follow Daata Editions on Instagram and Facebook (@daataeditions).

Follow I AM FILM on Instagram (iamfilmofficial). #IAMFILM and Join their list to receive news and views by the Masters of Film. 

https://www.iam.film/press/2018/1/7/david-gryn-interview

 

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Happy Happy New Year 2018

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Elliot Dodd, Internet, Jillian Mayer, Lu Yang, Post-Internet, Table.Video, Uncategorized, Video, VR on 31/12/2017 at 5:22 pm
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The Doctor by Elliot Dodd, 2018

 

Wishing you the Happiest and most Successful New Year 2018

Image: The Doctor by Elliot Dodd, a new Daata Editions commission available for viewing and acquiring in a few weeks.

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LuYang Interactive Hearse by Lu Yang 2017

Daata Editions Review of 2017

2017 was a fantastic year for us at Daata with so many amazing projects, artists commissions, exhibitions, art fair, gallery and museum collaborations.

Daata was curator of Film Cologne at Art Cologne, EXPO Sound at EXPO CHICAGO and exhibited at NADA New York, Sunday Art Fair London, PHOTOFAIRS Shanghai, Art Los Angeles Contemporary, Untitled Radio, Strangelove Film Festival. David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions curated his 7th Edition of Film & Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach.

Artists released by Daata in 2018 included: Jacky Connolly, Sue de Beer, Lu Yang, Jeremy Couillard, FlucT, Toby Ziegler, along with A-V curated by Amanda Schmitt featuring sound works by Maria Antelman, Alexandra Drewchin, FlucT, Marina Rosenfeld. NAUSEA VR curated and produced by Philip Hausmeier of Metaphysics VR, with artists Eddie Peake, Florian Meisenberg, Anne de Vries, Ruben Grilo, Jack Strange and Anna K.E. Zata Banks FRSA in Daata’s poetry section curated artists: Laura Focarazzo, Kate Jessop, C.O. Moed, Julian Scordato, Susanne Wiegner, Antoinette Zwirchmayr.

Daata has presented screenings, talks and events in collaboration with citizenM Hotels, Label Dalbin, Artspace, Artsy, Artload, A—Z, Kristiansand Kunsthall Norway, ARS 17 at KIASMA Museum Helsinki, M Woods Museum Beijing, MOUart Gallery Beijing, Zuecca Projects Venice, Vanity Projects NYC and Miami, Ludlow and Soho House New York & Chicago, ACE Hotels LA & Chicago, Freud Museum London, ZAP Shop and the Zabludowicz Collection.

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Day Off 3 by Jillian Mayer

Upcoming in 2018

2018 will be Daata’s busiest year ever, with fantastic collaborations scheduled on artists technology, video & sound projects with Independent New York, NADA New York, If So, What ? (the new tech meets art & design fair in Silicon Valley, San Jose), Art Rio, EXPO CHICAGO, PHOTOFAIRS Shanghai, Untitled Radio, Dalbin and their new table.video, Rhizome, citizenM Hotels, Vanity Projects NY & Miami, DKUK in Peckham, Art Night London, ICP NY and many many more.

Alongside many projects with leading global brands and exciting developments with VR and AR technologies. Daata is releasing many new artists in 2018, starting with Elliot Dodd, new Playlists, Curated projects and much much more ….

Image: Day Off 3 by Jillian Mayer / https://daata-editions.com/art/video/day-off-3

 

 

 

 

FlucT: The psychological thriller of Evidence, now on Daata Editions

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, FlucT, Performance, Uncategorized, Video on 22/10/2017 at 12:40 pm

FlucT – The psychological thriller of Evidence 

Now available to buy on Daata Editions

The subjects of these short texts feature FlucT. The table of contents is in itself hermetic. In 6 episodes, Monica & Sigrid traverse the psychological thrill within the manipulative isolation of a game. They flaunt evidence in the effective nature of capital as it sings the absurdity of our behavior and our performitivity. They include birdcages and bitches; the underlying systems that control us, warrior tactics toward empathy and the pregnancy of their relationship. The psychological thriller of Evidence can be considered a guidebook to the incessant questioning of reality that FlucT sees as the task of performance.

Monica Mirabile and Sigrid Lauren have been performing as FlucT since 2011, presenting a hybrid collaboration of radical choreography, confrontational performance art, collaborative practice and pure magic. Before entering into a performance, each individual places a spell of protection over each other, allowing themselves to push their physicality to the max while remaining mindful of their partner’s saftey. Their dance practice has been described as “violently intimate” and their performances often confront and challenge not only the space between their bodies, but between the performers and audience. Most works involve audio tracks designed by the artists, leading to a further intimacy and connection between the performance, performers, and audience. This work, “Main Tool as a Dummy,” reflects the rhythm and nonlinear narration of their performance work.

FlucT by Whitney Mallet in Cura magazine

 

Label Dalbin presents Table.Video at Design Miami/ Basel

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Design Miami, Design Miami Basel, Label Dalbin, Table.Video, Uncategorized, Video on 07/06/2017 at 9:44 pm

TABLE

Label Dalbin is proud to present videos from Daata Editions inside Table.Video at Design Miami/ Basel. This innovative table displays videos and images conceived by artists and uploaded by the user. It combines the classic function of furniture with a « digital canvas » of still and moving images in the heart of your living or exhibition space. 

Daata Editions commissions artist video, sound, poetry and web. This new and innovative way to collect art is designed specifically to be a native platform to a new generation of artists who work with moving image and sound. Limited edition artworks can be viewed and acquired as digital downloads.

Label Dalbin produces videos, installations, and performances at the interface between music and the visual arts for cultural institutions and private collections. Label Dalbin also conceives innovative audiovisual installation for interior design.

Visit Design Miami/ Basel
Booth C9, Hall 1 Süd, Messe Basel, Switzerland

From June 13th to 18th, 2017

More Info:

https://www.table.video/daata-editions

http://basel2017.designmiami.com/

Sue de Beer on Daata Editions

In Art Basel, Barcelona, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Film, LOOP, Marianne Boesky, Sue de Beer, Uncategorized, Video on 22/05/2017 at 4:01 pm

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Daata Editions has just announced the release of four new artworks by Sue de Beer specially commissioned for the platform.

This poem is me and it’s nothing but words about you I hope you like it (1 & 2)
Make up / sound test for a were-wolf film
(1 & 2)

Sue is a recent recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and is represented by Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York. Sue de Beer’s artwork release on Daata coincides with the LOOP Fair, Barcelona and Art Basel in June.

Khary Simon, a creative director and publisher based in New York, interviewed Sue de Beer on her 4 films for Daata Editions.

Are the films intended to be presented in a specific order?

No. They are separate but connected. I do watch them in the order of 1, 2, 3, 4. I cut them in the order of 1, 2, 3, 4. The first two naturally connect, and the last two naturally connect. So do 1 and 4. So do 2 and 3.

Is beauty fragile and or dangerous?

Yes. Fragile.

What about terror can be erotic or beautiful?

Everything.

Do you cherish objects of girlhood or wish we did?

Yes.

What is the origin of titles 1 and 2?

This poem is me
and it’s nothing but
words about you
I hope you like it

It’s from a Dennis Cooper poem – one that he contributed to my first catalogue. I think it’s beautiful. Shifts around the watcher and the watched.

Sue de Beer’s work is located at the intersection between film and installation, sculpture and photography. Solo exhibitions include the Kunst Werke, Berlin, the Whitney Museum of American Art at Altria, the MuHKA Museum in Antwerp, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions in Los Angeles, The Park Avenue Armory, New York, as well as at Marianne Boesky Gallery.

The artworks start from $200. http://daata-editions.com

TRAILER

Daata x Vanity present Saya Woolfalk

In Art, Art Fair, Artist, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Digital, digital art, Frieze, Frieze Art Fair, Leslie Tonkonow, Miami, New York, Rita Pinto, Saya Woolfalk, Uncategorized, Vanity Projects, Video on 30/04/2017 at 7:25 am

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Daata Editions x Vanity Projects – featuring Saya Woolfalk

Colour Mixing Machine

On view in both Vanity NYC and Miami venues April 15 – May 9

Vanity Projects, 99 Chrystie St 2F, New York, NY, 10002 +16464102928

www.vanityprojectsnyc.com/ & https://daata-editions.com/

Saya Woolfalk is a New York based artist who uses science fiction and fantasy to re-imagine the world in multiple dimensions. With the multi-year projects No Place, The Empathics and ChimaTEK, Woolfalk has created the world of the Empathics, a fictional race of women who are able to alter their genetic make-up and fuse with plants. With each body of work, Woolfalk continues to build the narrative of these women’s lives, and questions the utopian possibilities of cultural hybridity. The Pollen Catchers is a continuation of ChimaTEK, in which the Empathics employ color-mixing machines to further shape shift their morphology. Sound attribution to The Hathaway Family Plot. https://daata-editions.com/artists/saya-woolfalk

“2017 promises to be an exciting year for Vanity Projects, which is partnering with Daata Editions, the British-based online art platform equally dedicated to outside-the-box experimentation. This initiative will bring a wealth of talent to both the Miami and New York venues, starting with Scott Reeder, followed by Saya Woolfalk, Ed Fornieles, Yung Jake, Jacky Connolly, Jillian Mayer, Jeremy Couillard, Rashaad Newsome and others. “A Goth Life,” a group show opening in June, cheekily brings together video that honors “our joyously soulless, self-reflective, insular, tension and angst ridden times,” just in time for the sunny summer. Key activations with art institutions will expand the project’s reach, with plans for potential events during Art Basel Miami Beach.” Text by Scott Indrisek

Vanity Projects in collaboration with Daata Editions welcomes Frieze, Vanity and Daata guests, Friday May 5, 10am-12pm for a screening of Saya Woolfalk’s work Color Mixing Machine 1-6, and complimentary nail polish manicures inspired by the artist & join Rita Pinto, David Gryn and Saya Woolfalk for drinks from 6-8pm. RSVP: contact@vanityprojectsnyc.com

Saya Woolfalk: ChimaCloud and the Pose System at Leslie Tonkonow. New works by the artist are on view through May 6th in Saya Woolfalk: ChimaCloud and the Pose System at Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, 535 West 22nd Street, New York, NY. www.tonkonow.com

Daata Editions on Artspace

In Artist, Artspace, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Digital, Online, Uncategorized, Video on 31/01/2017 at 12:25 pm

 

Daata Editions now available to purchase on Artspace

https://www.artspace.com/partn…

Artists selected:  Larry Achiampong, Casey Jane Ellison, Tracey Emin, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Scott Lyman, Takeshi Murata, Tameka Norris, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Jacolby Satterwhite, Saya Woolfalk, Zadie Xa.

Daata Editions commissions artists video, sound, poetry and web. Artworks on the website are available to view and acquire as digital downloads in a limited edition.

Daata Playlist:

Larry Achiampong, 1. The Beginning (19 Degrees), 2016

Casey Jane Ellison, Do You Seem Wonderful Casey Automated Private Test (DYSWCAPT) 1, 2016

Tracey Emin, You Must Have Hope, 2016

Ed Fornieles, Electric, 2016

Leo Gabin, Break Up, 2015

Scott Lyman, Pink Empire, 2016

Takeshi Murata, OM Making It Rain, 2015

Tameka Norris, immature tameka, 2016

Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Pink Rooms, 2016

Jacolby Satterwhite, En Plein Air Abstraction #4, 2016

Saya Woolfalk, Colour Mixing Machine 6, 2016

Zadie Xa, Deep Space Mathematics // The Transfer of Knowledge 1, 2016

 

Image: Casey Jane Ellison, Do You Seem Wonderful Casey Automated Private Test (DYSWCAPT) 1, 2016

The Best Dressed Chicken in Town – Film and Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2016 – curated by David Gryn

In Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Fair, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Film, Miami, Miami Beach, Papermag, Uncategorized, Video on 01/11/2016 at 4:30 pm
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Jillian Mayer, I am your Grandma, 2011 (courtesy the artist and David Castill0 Gallery)

Best Dressed Chicken in Town curated by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions

A compilation of artworks by Ana Mendieta, Anri Sala, Derrick Adams with Ramon Silvera, Samson Young, Kudzanai Chiurai, Edgardo Aragón, Luther Price, Catharina van Eetvelde, Ara Peterson, Matt Copson, Martin Creed, Jillian Mayer, György Kovásznai, Tromarama, Kim Gordon, Li Shurui & Li Daiguo, Adam Shecter, Brian Alfred, Dashiell Manley, Haroon Mirza, Zak Ové, Cabelo, Lena Daly, Nate Boyce, Tomislav Gotovac, Rodney Graham, Keren Cytter.

Screenings daily at 8pm on Weds Nov 30, Thurs Dec 1, Fri Dec 2, Sat Dec 3.

Film & Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2016

Soundscape Park, New World Symphony Center, Miami Beach

artbasel.com/miami-beach/film

With a title borrowed from a classic 1970s reggae song by Jamaican dj/singer Doctor Alimantado, this year’s short film program focuses on a selection of international artists who engage with music in a multitude of ways. All the films in this varied and exciting program demonstrate the power of music to attract an audience, keep it engaged, elicit suspense and tug at the heartstrings. Similar to classical symphony works, the order of the films builds up a crescendo to create an awe-inspiring magic derived from the works in their entirety.

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Tromarama, Serigala Militia, 2006 (courtesy the artists and Edouard Malingue)

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Papermag Mega Guide to Art Basel Miami Beach 2016

More info from the Art Basel Press Release:

Film: Art Basel announces details of its 2016 Film program in Miami Beach.

From November 30 through December 4, 2016, Art Basel will present a premier program of over 50 film and video works by some of today’s most exciting artists from North and South America, Europe, Asia and Africa.

Selected from the show’s participating galleries by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions and Artprojx, this year’s program will include ‘Muxima’, the first film by Chilean-born artist Alfredo Jaar, as well as a silent film about music by Christian Marclay and a new work by Liliana Porter.

The program will also include short films by Edgardo Aragón, Ain Bailey and Sonia Boyce, Cabelo, Kudzanai Chiurai, Martin Creed, Keren Cytter, Kim Gordon, Rodney Graham, György Kovásznai, Rashid Johnson, Li Daiguo, Li Shurui, Jillian Mayer, Ana Mendieta, Haroon Mirza, Ara Peterson, Alex Prager, Anri Sala, Wilhelm Sasnal, Tromarama and Samson Young among many others.

Screenings will take place both in SoundScape Park on the 7,000 square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, as well as on dedicated touchscreen monitors within the Film Library at Art Basel’s show in the Miami Beach Convention Center.

In addition, Marian Masone, New York based film consultant and strategist, has selected ‘Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back’ (2016) directed by Maura Axelrod, for a special screening at the Colony Theatre on Friday, December 2.

Returning for his sixth year, curator David Gryn presents several works that engage with music, including a set of 28 short films screened under the title ‘Best Dressed Chicken in Town’ after a classic 1970s reggae song by Jamaican singer Doctor Alimantado.

The lineup focuses on a selection of international artists who engage with music in a multitude of ways. A ‘Double Bill’ program will pair two film works that share similar themes or approaches to an intense musical score: Rita Ackermann (b. 1968) and Christian Marclay (b. 1955) on Wednesday, and Liliana Porter (b. 1941) and Alfredo Jaar (b. 1956) on Friday.

The late screening on Thursday, December 1 will feature works by sound artist and DJ Ain Bailey (b. 1963), with Sonia Boyce (b.1962), along with pieces by Anna Grenman (b. 1984), Rashid Johnson (b. 1977), Alex Prager (b. 1979) and Penny Siopis (b. 1953).

The final presentation on Saturday, December 3 will include three early films by Polish artist Wilhelm Sasnal (b. 1972), in which he added visual accompaniment to enhance the aural experience, along with a recent work, in which the score directly drives the narrative, replacing spoken words.

Every evening, directly preceding the Film program, surround sound works by Ain Bailey, Zoë Buckman, A.K. Burns, Jonathan Montague, Molly Palmer and Susannah Stark will be presented on the state-of-the-art surround system in SoundScape Park.

In conjunction with the outdoor film screenings, over 50 works have been selected to be shown exclusively within Art Basel’s designated Film Library at the Miami Beach Convention Center. Visitors will be able to individually screen over 50 works by artists such as Stephen Dean, Edith Dekyndt, Maggie Lee, Gabriel Lester, Shelly Nadashi, Sophie Nys, João Vasco Paiva, Betye Saar, Jason Simon, Su-Mei Tse and Tuo Wang. The Film Library is accessible inside the fair halls on touch-screen monitors during show hours. Access with a show entrance ticket.

On Sunday, December 4 at 2pm, Art Basel’s Salon program will feature ‘The Artist as Composer’, a talk between the artists Rachel Manson, Molly Palmer and Susannah Stark, and Kathryn Mikesell, Founder of The Fountainhead Residency and Studios in Miami. The talk will be moderated by William Simmons, author, Hyperallergic, New York, with an introduction by Film and Sound curator David Gryn.

Art Basel entry tickets include admission to Salon.

The Film sector’s Media Partner is Time Out. For the full gallery list for Film, please visit artbasel.com/miami-beach/film

Art Basel Facebook page

Time Out – Things to do at Art Basel in Miami Beach https://www.timeout.com/miami/things-to-do/art-basel-miami-2016-film

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keren Cytter on Reinventing the Rules of Filmmaking – Artspace interview by Loney Abrams

In Andrew Goldstein, Art Basel, Artspace, Daata Editions, Digital, Frieze, keren cytter, Loney Abrams, Uncategorized, Video on 13/10/2016 at 5:35 pm

 

terrorist-of-love-by-keren-cytter-2016

Image Still: Keren Cytter, Terrorist of Love, 2016 (a Free Downloadable Artwork – commissioned by Daata Editions and Artspace)

Keren Cytter on Reinventing the Rules of Filmmaking (or, How to Manipulate Your Audience) by Loney Abrams, Artspace.

It’s difficult to speak about Keren Cytter’s oeuvre holistically, only because she’s such a prolific artist that it’s almost impossible to view it all. The Israeli-born, New York-based filmmaker and writer has produced over 60 videos; published seven books that include novels, poetry, and screenplays; and is also the founder of dance company Dance International Europe Now (aka D.I.E. Now.)… and she’s hasn’t even turned 40.

Like Martin Heidegger’s famous hammer, which only reveals its true nature once it breaks or otherwise fails to function, Cytter’s films employ cliché to set up familiar reference points only to break them down—with poorly dubbed dialogue, fragmented or repetitious story-lines, and subtitles that address the viewer, for example­—and reveal the cinematic conventions that are normally invisible to us.

Cytter’s bag of tricks is chock-full of immediately identifiable tropes, from overly dramatized Hollywood mobster and thriller genre films, that have been delivered so adeptly by directors like Francis Ford Coppola, Alfred Hitchcock, and Quentin Tarantino. But Cytter’s use of these devices don’t quite fit—instead, they feel willfully clumsy and absurd. The 2014 video Rose Garden ends as a young boy is shot with a rifle after stealing a disco ball from the kind of timeless Midwestern dive bar you might expect to see in No Country for Old Men. The boy, refereed to by his bartending parents as both “Scott” and “Stock,” had shot his mother a few seconds before for no discernible reason, and the two murders (of which there are four total in the nine-minute-long film) seemed to bear no relation to one another.

Equally disorienting, the film Four Seasons (2009) starts with a shot of blood dripping onto white tile as a wounded man sits in a bathtub with snow falling around him. After the opening credit sequence, a woman enters the bathroom to ask the man to turn his music down, which she can hear from the apartment next door. The man yells twice, “Stella!” (presumably in reference to Marlon Brando‘s oft-parodied line from A Streetcar Named Desire) and the woman replies, “My name is Lucy, man,” before conversation unfolds casually as if nothing is out of the ordinary. Cytter uses clichés like cinematic readymades, using them to piece together disjointed, fragmented, often absurdist narratives. As a viewer, it sometimes feels as if, through her exaggerated use of cinematic conventions, Cytter is reminding us that we’re watching a film.

Humor, some theorists believe, is experienced when a person’s worldview is turned on its head for a split-second, and then revealed to be only temporary, a joke. Cytter’s films are funny—funny in a smart, dry way that challenges the viewer’s relationship to film. In Cytter’s Video Art Manual, the artist illustrates, quite literally, the filmic conventions and cinematic clichés that she subverts in her work.

The video begins with a young man in a suit sitting at a desk addressing the camera: “In this informal presentation I will try to unfold the great mysteries of new medias and reveal the utopian anxieties of the common man.” By then, we can already assume that this won’t be a straightforward educational film by the way the audio inexplicably changes volume mid-sentence, at times becoming unsynchronized with the actor’s lips. This scene segues into the next with a countdown that only goes from “five…” to “four…,” leading into a montage of news footage that introduces a second narrative, an impending cataclysmic solar flare event, that continues to weave in and out of the rest of the film.

Characters preparing for this imminent environmental catastrophe shift between inhabiting their roles as fictional characters and acting as actors who are playing their characters’ parts. We see one actor selling himself during a casting call, though his rehearsed speech makes it obvious that this too is an act. “You’ve got to take me, I’m multitalented. I speak three languages, sprechen sie Deutsch, y hablo Español,” the actor says before spouting off generic textbook Spanish phrases, while a superimposed subtitle reads, “The performers aren’t as concerned with their acting skills as they are representing familiar characters and situations. Subtitles help to distract the viewer from bad acting and visual mistakes.” Cytter’s films may follow some sort of narrative thrust, but the meat of the work’s content can be found on the bones—the form, the structure that is conventionally out of site but is foregrounded for Cytter. We as viewers are as aware of the off-screen editor, the director, the script writer (who are all, of course, Cytter), as we are the actors onscreen.

For an artist making self-reflexive medium-specific work, Cytter sure does work in a number of media. In 2008, Cytter expanded into the world of theater, founding her dance company, D.I.E. Now. Their first production, The True Story of John Webber and His Endless Struggle With the Table of Content was as much Samuel Beckett as it was “Disney on Ice.” Combining dance, video, music (composed by Cytter herself), and spoken text, the artist worked with non-professional performers—a trademark Cytter carried over from her video work. The production was performed at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in London in 2009.

Cytter’s most recent work is yet another departure from her cinematic mainstays. Terrorist of Love, commissioned by Artspace and Daata Editions (and available as a free download here), is a music video, and uses imagery native to the Internet—two firsts for the artist.  Using a fixed 4K camera, Cytter shot the video in one take, before devising an unconventional video format in post-production solely using key framing, meme-like imagery, and an original soundtrack—an unprecedented approach to video-making in any genre. Here, Artspace’s Loney Abrams talks to the artist about making Terrorist of Love, her self-imposed rules of production, addictive Instagram habits, and the artist’s unfulfilled desire to make her audience feel sad.

Terrorist of Love seems to be the first video you’ve made that is soundtrack driven. How did the idea come about?

I hadn’t made anything like this before. I was in Israel and I was visiting my friend who is a musician, and I asked him for songs. He had this one and I decided to work on it. Then I said, “Okay, we can replace him with performers.” So that’s what we did!

Would you consider it a music video?

I’d say it’s a music video, yeah. [Laughs.] I made up a structure to follow: I will use a very good camera and will shoot two performers on a roof, lip-syncing and casually dancing to the song, and after that, I will zoom into the frame and let the camera move to the shift of the music, on different details of the shot.

What are the lyrics?

Terrorist of Love / Turkish Delight / Search me / Search me. I think it’s a love song, using political words. I made up the choreography.

Have you used meme-type imagery before or is this new too?

On my Instagram yes, but no, never in a video. It doesn’t ever fit with a plot so I could never do it.

Can you talk about your Instagram?

I’m obsessed. I was in rehab for three weeks!

You’re addicted to Instagram?

Yeah, my friend told me I should stop. I should stop. I think I’m really neurotic so that’s why I’m doing it. Instead of biting my nails I’m posting on Instagram. I got addicted, and I’m trying to post less—that’s why I’m erasing posts all the time. Also, I decide to always have less than 1,000.

1,000 posts? 

Images in in general, yeah. Because, to me, it looks vulgar if I have a lot. I also don’t follow people who post too much. That’s why I don’t like myself so much for doing it. I’m much less exclusive when I post a lot.

Sometimes an artist’s work becomes devalued when the artist overproduces. The demand can’t keep up with supply. You talk about your Instagram as if it’s going to lose value if you over-post!

No, it’s not that—I just don’t like people that post a lot. It means they have no life, and as you can see, I have tons of life. [Laughter.] No, I don’t know, I just post images all the time because whenever I have an empty moment I start to correct images and post instead of reading or doing something constructive. Like I told Fabian [an actor in Cytter’s upcoming theater performance], “Let’s go outside and bring the book,” so we brought the book and then I just sat outside posting images.

I’ve been following your Instagram for a while, and I’ve notice you use a lot of hashtags, which become poetic in a sense because they really aren’t useful as hashtags. It seems like sometimes the images on Instagram are secondary to your comments and hashtags.

It’s a lack of confidence sometimes. I think that my images are not good enough so I try to pump them up with the right hashtags. I want to express myself but I think sometimes images are not expressing myself. And sometimes I just don’t have good images! With all the life I have, I don’t have juicy, juicy images! [Laughs.]

In your films, what is more important, the images or the language?

I think the images, generally. The images are not connected very well, so I need lots of language to pull them together. Actually, there is one thing that’s funny with Terrorist of Love. Even if I use a good-quality camera it always comes out really bad, and for this video I used a 4K. So it’s a 4K image, but because you get into the frame, the quality comes out worse than any normal camera. So I said, “Oh, I’m keeping my line of bad images!”

In the first 10 seconds of the video, I thought you were zooming in and out on a still photograph—but then I began to realize that parts of the image were animated, and it was actually a video.

Yeah, well the camera didn’t move the whole time. That was my initial plan: to do everything like voyeurism in the frame.

Yeah, it’s amazing how dynamic you were able to make it without moving the camera. There’s so much going on in the video even though there was really very little activity on set.

Yeah I think people will really enjoy watching it… I think. I like it a lot. It’s going to be cute. It’s like, all Disney.

The scenery is so New York. It’s shot on a rooftop covered in graffiti, overlooking the Manhattan skyline. This kind of scenery is kind of cliché for a certain type of music video—but Terrorist of Love is so not the type of video you’d imagine in this setting.

[Laughs.] Yeah. At first I imagined filming it with the musician who wrote the song at his place in Israel. When we used to work together we got along very well, but when I left Israel 13 years ago, we became a bit like my characters and started drifting apart. I realized I’d be happier to do it not with him, but just to give him the video in the end. So that’s why I imposed everything I planned to do in Israel just on New York. To get into the frame with the sound of the music as the goal.

Your films are really transparent about the medium. So, sure, they’re about some characters, and there’s a storyline, but they’re also about people who are acting in front of a camera, and people who are reading scripts, and people who are making a film—in a way that makes the viewer very aware that they are watching a video. And in more recent years, you’ve also started doing live performances and theater. So I’m wondering how you carry the meta-narrative onto the stage?

Actually it’s quite easy. Now I’m doing a script for a theater we’re going to do. Suzy starts saying, “You might know me from other performances as in—just kidding, I never get the roll.” So you just need to say it and it’s there. It’s just a matter of marking it. You always know that it’s an act. I didn’t invent it, you know so, it’s quite easy— you just play all the time between those worlds.

Audiences obviously have very different expectations when they’re watching film or they’re watching theater. I imagine with film you’re able, through editing, to better direct how your audiences experience the film. You probably can’t do this as easily with theater. Is your audience on your mind when you’re making your work?

I see myself as my audience. When I see a theater play, I’m judging it. So the first thing I had to do when I wrote the text for Suzy is pull one over on the audience, to shock them so that after they stop judging and get into the plot. I like to have a plot but also I like the audience not to forget that they’re watching a play, or watching a film. I hate to waste my time watching other people’s stories. I like when things are not clear to me. I also like that I can feel things—I like to get sad. But I’m not so good at making sad things, I’m better at humor. People are more attached to things if they are feeling sad, so I try to make sad things now, but it’s really embarrassing me.

So your motivation to make sad stories comes not from necessarily having sad stories to tell but wanting people to feel sad?

Yes, exactly. It’d be great if they can’t understand what the story was but they say, “It was so sad.” That would be great because it means I really manipulated them.

In Video Art Manual, the format you’ve set up is similar to a how-to video and then woven into that is this kind of absurdist narrative about an impending apocalyptic solar flare event.

Ah yes.

And then on top of that you’re also bringing the viewer into it by commenting on their experience, and so I’m wondering how you differentiate, or if you differentiate, between narrative and content?

Well for me the content is actually the structure of things, not the narrative itself. The narrative is just an excuse for the audience to keep on following. With the solar flame, I was a bit consumed by it. I read it and I was really worried for my job because they said there will be an electricity power cut, and I said “How can I make videos?” and I said “Oh, I can make drawings.”

I mentioned several times in the video the solar flame and the consequences because that will make the audience keep on watching it, and, for me, that narrative is more interesting than the history of video art. So for me the structures and the frames are much more interesting than the narrative, and the narrative is just for the audience. And it’s also a way for the images to come together so I can smash different things and it will make sense for you because there is some kind of narrative—my excuse for it.

So making a narrative is just an excuse—

To create structures, yeah.

So the narrative gives you an excuse to make a formal film. You also use many different languages in your films and I wonder if that’s an excuse to use subtitles and text as another play on form?

Yeah. Right. Also, you see an Italian movie and it’s not acted well or you don’t get the language so you just say, “Oh, it’s the Italian”—that’s what I think, “Oh, it’s the Italian, Italians are like that.” But when I was in Italy I made a movie there and I asked one of the girls to act like Anna Magnani and she knew exactly what I meant and I realized she was acting a certain way—it’s not like the way Italians act normally, so I was right.

What’s your writing process like? Would you walk us through how you get from point A to B?

It’s depressing actually, I just don’t leave the house. That’s why I’m posting a lot. I have no life so because I need to write all the time. I need to find an idea and until I have an idea I cannot write. It’s better not to write until I have the idea, and then when I start writing I write halfway through and I think it’s fine, and then I realize I cannot continue because the idea is not finished, it doesn’t have enough rules. I need to have more rules and more framing.

What do you mean by rules?

For example I made a Russian movie in Russia with naked people—lots of penises. It’s a very classic movie—the camera doesn’t move. I needed some rules… nine shots with no zoom in and no panning; three acts with three shots in each act. I was in Russia and I was googling “crazy Russians” and I found a crazy image of Russians taping up their apartment with plastic and then flooding it like a swimming pool. My backyard is really fitting for that, actually. That was in my head, that I wanted to turn my backyard into a swimming pool. So I decided to make a movie because of this image.

Because it was with Russians I could do it hardcore, and there were lots of penises and porn and stuff like that. I thought also, because it’s Russians, it’s a bit political because of the power shift I think now in the world. So there were three guys and one girl because I’m concerned about women’s rights, and then it begins actually representing minorities in general. At the end of each act, one of them dies, but keeps on living in the next act. So that was part of the rules.

Another rule was that it needed to be in Russian, and the camera doesn’t move so they need some time to lower themselves to fit into the frame. Maybe there were more things that I forgot. But I need lots of rules just in order to write.

I’m thinking about this device you’re using in Terrorist of Love where you don’t move the camera. The video is static with no cuts. It seems super contemporary, actually, in that a lot of video we’re seeing are coming directly from people’s iPhones. For example, on Facebook Live or Periscope, it’s live-streamed and you can’t make edits. We’re probably getting used to seeing more of these really long takes.

Ah, yeah, that’s cool. Actually in cinema, that’s what counts as a good thing—if the take is long. And subconsciously I think it somehow stays with you. At least it does with me in The Passenger with Jack Nicholson. The last shot is 360 degrees uncut. I like it.

Do you have anything coming up that you’re excited about?

Excited? [Laughs.]

[Laughs.] Do you have anything coming up that you are excited about or not excited about?

My book [A-Z Life Coaching] will come out in two weeks. The book’s cover designer is the designer of the poster from The Lobster, the movie. I met him once and I found his email and he agreed to do it, so it’s really cool. I like it; he invented it.

Also there will be this theater thing we are going to do. We’re going to shoot one part with Colby Keller, who’s a gay porn star, and we are going to show it in the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam in November. I don’t know if I’m excited about this, or I’m afraid. Woah, yeah, I’m not excited yet.

Get your Keren Cytter Free Download Here

https://daata-editions.com/art/video/terrorist-of-love

5 Questions with Daata Editions – Elephant Magazine

In Art Basel, Charles Richardson, Chloe Wise, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Blandy, David Gryn, Elephant, Uncategorized, Video on 21/11/2015 at 10:59 am

5 Questions with Daata Editions

http://www.elephantmag.com/5-questions-with-daata-editions/

Text by Emily Steer

Daata Editions is an online platform that commissions digital artists’ editions—mostly video-, sound- and web-based. Season One brought together eighteen artists, who each created six pieces of work, last month joining two different collections in completion; Germany’s Julia Stoschek Collection and LA’s Hammer Museum.

Season One featured the work of; Ilit Azoulay, Helen Benigson, David Blandy, Matt Copson, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Daniel Keller & Martti Kalliala, Lina Lapelyte, Rachel Maclean, Florian Meisenberg, Takeshi Murata, Hannah Perry, Jon Rafman, Charles Richardson, Amalia Ulman, Stephen Vitiello and Chloe Wise.

Here, five of the artists discuss the purpose of digital platforms in the present art world and the future of art online.

When did you start work with Daata Editions, and what do you feel online platforms can offer to digital artists?

Chloe Wise: I began working with Daata Editions for their first iteration–or season of artists I suppose–about a year ago now. For an emerging artist, especially for an artist working with digital media, it can be hard to find viewership, a consumer market, a collector base, the funds with which to produce work, and a comprehensive placement within the art world for oneself. Working with Daata Editions not only enabled the artists, including myself, to create work that otherwise may not have been made, but to circulate this work in the context of art fairs, screenings both indoors and outdoors, in a gallery setting as well as online and placing the works into great collections and institutions. This visibility and accessibility is imperative to digital work, which is in a state of growth and change, and is so easily dismissed in the constant flow of images and videos on the internet.

As a digital artist, do you consider the fit of your work on the market, or is this a secondary concern? 

Florian Meisenberg: When creating either a digital or analogue art work, I don’t start by thinking about it fitting into the market. Generally, my motivation to create art is not dependent on its degree of ‘fitability’ with anything. Although sometimes I feel embarrassed that I can’t sign my videos.

Have you felt the reception towards digital work change in any way since you began your practice?  

David Blandy: When I started exhibiting, the digital world of computing, gaming and the Internet were marginal cultural interests, the preserve of geeks like me. The Internet was dial up, computer games were making their first experiments in 3D graphics, and VHS was the standard exhibition format for video. So my work thinking about and using digital culture, using backgrounds from video games and performances inside virtual spaces, were seen as pretty alien from mainstream culture and were probably pretty mystifying to an artworld that was largely computer illiterate. Now the digital is central to our everyday visual culture–CGI on tv, adverts, films, every photo is computer manipulated, only occasional heads unbowed at train stations, contemplating the sky rather than their phone.

Do you feel that your work exists in accordance with the technology it was created for? Or is the material something that could be transferred to different tech over the years?

Matt Copson: My work exists in accordance but is not enslaved by current technology. I’m sure things would change radically with any contextual shifts, be they technological, political or financial but hopefully my work isn’t just a symptom of its time. Most of the more digital aspects of my work and installations are basic or quite a primitive use of more complex programs. I don’t care for professionalising my skills, rather I enjoy being an enthusiastic amateur with a level of distance from the technology I’m using. I like the idea of using photoshop in the same way I’d carve a sculpture with a chainsaw and sledgehammer. I see no reason why works couldn’t be transferred to different technology over the years. But my principal concern, of course, is in how they are shown/heard in the present.

What do you see being the biggest driver of digital art in the future?

Helen Benigson: I am sure the continuous and accelerating trend of the public giving up personal data to big companies will lead to some very interesting work being made. However, I also feel that as the body becomes even more exploited through medical and visceral mediation online, artists will necessarily need to drive a new concept of what intimacy, privacy and the corporeal looks like. I don’t think there has ever been more of a crucial time to bring art and technology together, than the current climate we are living in. There is increasingly a general blurring of boundaries and a development of terms such as the ‘creative’ or ‘cultural producer’, via the recruitment of artists into the technology industry which has a more general emphasis on the idea of creativity at work across many different industry sectors. Many of the concepts that have shaped the working culture in the tech industry (such as ‘play’, live-work, loft spaces and temporary contracts) are derived from artists’ working habits, like Second Home and its relationship to the Serpentine Pavilion. It is essential to understand these messy overlaps in order to try to decipher how and where art will move to as artists move away from big cities and increasingly have to work more online in order to survive.

All works: 2015, Courtesy Daata Editions