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The artwork is a digital file, yes by Pau Waelder – a new Foreword for Daata Editions

In Art Basel, Art Video, Collecting, Collector, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, NADA, Pau Waelder, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 16/11/2018 at 11:26 am

pau-waelder-2016-BN

The artwork is a digital file, yes

by Pau Waelder

A new Foreword for Daata Editions

When considering how to collect digital art, we come across two preconceptions: what an artwork must be and what digital files are worth. First, it is commonly assumed that an artwork is an object with unique attributes, original, and irreplaceable. The object routinely goes from the artist’s studio to the gallery, where it is acquired by a collector. There is no doubt that it is always the same object that trades hands, and it is finally the collector who decides where the artwork is placed and who has access to it. Conceptual and performance art has challenged this notion again and again, but the artwork always finds its way into the market and the collector’s home in the form of a more or less stable object. Thus, if an artwork (a) is not an object, (b) can be copied, (c) can be accessed or experienced beyond the control of its owner(s), and/or (c) requires a computer, software and display to be at all perceivable, some may find it “difficult,” “challenging,” or even not worth collecting. This relates to the second preconception.

Our computers, tablets and smartphones are constantly storing digital files. Most of them we have created ourselves, others we have downloaded for free or for a fee. They fill the device’s storage space and force us to either copy them to other devices, store them in the cloud or delete them. Digital files are therefore constantly moved around, copied and erased, both a necessity and a burden. In most cases, we don’t know what to do with them, they just linger in folders and hidden directories until detected by a cleanup app or simply obliterated when the device that stores them reaches the end of its service life. Digital files, therefore, tend to be considered expendable in the sense that there should always be another copy somewhere. In fact, a growing segment of the entertainment industry relies on selling access to content on digital files that we temporarily store in our devices and swiftly remove when we are done watching the film, tv series, or documentary; listening to the song or podcast; reading the book, graphic novel or magazine. Many times, the file is not even downloaded, it is streamed and thus disappears the moment it is not used anymore, without leaving a trace. When we pay for the content, we either rely on it being safely stored by the provider and always conveniently accessible or we just want to experience it and never care what happens to it afterwards, because there will always be more, newer content ready to be clicked on.

My point is that artworks and digital files seem to be incompatible, due to how we tend to conceive artworks and our daily experience with digital files. Artworks are forever, digital files are ephemeral. Artworks are unique objects, digital files are immaterial worthless copies. However, an artwork does not need to be an object. In fact, a painting is not an object, it is an image that becomes a physical object because the pigment needs to be placed on a surface and canvases make it easier than walls to create, move around and sell the images. An artwork created in a digital format (a video, sound, jpeg, gif, 3D animation, browser-based piece or what have you) is not only always a copy but also the result of a software interpreting a file on a certain display, so every time it is experienced it turns out to be, in a way, a unique performance. Of course, one has to make sure that the software works with the file and that the display shows the piece as intended, but that’s all part of the artwork being something other than a static, physical object –which would nevertheless require certain conditions of placement, lighting, humidity and so forth. Finally, the artwork may be available to others even if it is safely at home and a certificate of authenticity, kept in the safe, states that no one else owns it. Artworks have a life of their own as they are viewed in exhibitions, reproduced in photographs and videos, distributed in magazines, books and blogs. Most of the art we know and love, we have never owned and will never own – even big collectors know and love much more art than they have bought. A large part of that art we have seen through reproductions, mostly on screens. It is still part of us, and for those who were lucky, smart or powerful enough to buy it, the more people who feel that the artwork is part of them, the better. For what good is it to own something that no one else knows about, that none can appreciate, that cannot be shared?

Digital art allows us to own and at the same time share an artwork – not only its reproduction. This can raise some eyebrows and insecurities. It may be argued that if the artwork is available elsewhere or that it can be copied, it loses its value. However, in addition to what I have already stated about the nature of a digital file, let us consider what Nelson Goodman found to be the difference between an original artwork and a forgery: its history of production. A digital artwork that has been purchased from a reputable source with a valid registry of authenticity has a history of production that can be established from the artist to the collector. No matter how many copies of the artwork may circulate, only the collector – or collectors if the artwork is editioned– can claim ownership and, more importantly, become part of the history of the artwork. This is not just provenance, which will matter to the next owner, but an active involvement in the existence of the artwork, its relevance and also in supporting the work of the artist. This is where Daata Editions comes in. Daata commissions art that is sold through its online platform in limited editions. The artists are paid to produce artworks that anyone can buy with a few clicks. The buyer can download the artwork and store it in her computer, on the cloud, wherever, make copies and display them on any device she owns. The rest of us can see the same artwork – watermarked – on the platform, appreciate it, maybe feel the urge to own it too. But we won’t be part of the artwork’s history, only those who bought it do. And those who are lucky or smart enough get the first edition.

Pau Waelder is a curator, writer and researcher whose work focuses on contemporary art and new media.

https://daata-editions.com/

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The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin

In Art Night, Art NIght London, Dancer, Film, Gryn, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, John Snijders, London, Marriot, Nijinsky, Poppy Bowers, Uncategorized, Video on 16/10/2018 at 2:33 pm
The Nijinsky project – installation assemblage pieces:
1933 bio Nijinsky by Romona Nijinsky, cloth, acrylic, porcelain, wood, steel
IMG_5446

Romola’s love

work by Jane Bustin

Relentless Hatred

work by Jane Bustin

Dark Moods

work by Jane Bustin

Hothouse plants

photo 1

Misfortunes

The Nijinsky project – Faun

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Premiered for Artnight London 2018 at London County Hall, Southbank London

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Jane Bustin
Isaac Gryn 
John Snijders
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Installation and performance – Vimeo 
Highlights – Vimeo
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Duration:
13 minutes.
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Introduction by Poppy Bowers
In 1912, Ballet Russes premiered L’Après-midi d’un Faune at Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris. Eschewing lyrical movement in favour of geometric shapes, its avant-garde choreography and sexually explicit content divided audiences, prompting both outrage and awe. The performance, now regarded as the first modernist ballet, was choreographed and performed by Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950), senior dancer of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes, and also his lover.
An iconic dancer, Nijinsky was experimental in his combination of great technical skill with deep, sensual expression. Over recent years, the artist Jane Bustin has made work in response to Nijinsky’s extraordinary formal experimentation. Like Nijinsky, Bustin is concerned with locating emotion within the restrained forms of geometric abstraction. Her pared-down paintings juxtapose panels of oil paint alongside tactile media such as porcelain, silk, copper or latex, to give sensory understanding to historical subject matter.
Faun is a new collaborative work that pays homage to Nijinsky’s tumultuous life. The work comprises of three parts; six table-mounted assemblages made by Bustin, a musical score by composer John Snijders and a balletic performance by the young dancer Isaac Gryn. The table works create a conceptual and spatial framework for the performative components, taking as its starting point a published book of Nijinsky’s life.
Following his ascendency as one who heralded the era of modern ballet, Nijinsky met misfortune. Having secretly married a young dancer, Romola, a furious Diaghilev subsequently expelled him from the Ballet Russes. Failing to recover from the artistic and financial loss of Diaghilev’s patronage, Nijinsky was forced to abandon dance. Suffering from psychosis he spent his remaining years residing in and out of asylums, until his death in Surrey, England. The account of his success and decline is recited in Nijinsky’s biography written by Romola and published in 1933, a single copy of which forms the centrepiece of each table assemblage.
Each book is accompanied by monochrome panels of various media including cloth, porcelain, paint and wood, the fragility of which point to emotionally-sensitive moments in Nijinsky’s life. From tallest to shortest, the tables take the following titles from a chance finding of a 1933 newspaper review that chart Nijinsky’s psychological trauma; Hothouse Plants, Relentless Hatred, Dark Moods, Misfortunes, “I am an Artist” and Romola’s Love. Typical of Bustin’s work, the proportions of the tables relate to the scale of the human body. Here, the table heights correspond to particular ballet movements measured from the young male dancer’s body, who is the artist’s son.
John Snijder’s musical score, titled Afternoon, was created specifically for this project. It reworks the piano piece of the original orchestral work for L’Après-midi d’un Faune composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), employing chance operations to unravel its structural order. Developed in dialogue between Bustin and Gryn, with support from Matthew Paluch and Dance Research Studio, a 13-minute dance, made in response to the music, is performed within the parameters of the tables. Combining symmetrical formations with lessening control, Gryn’s movements mirror the untangled composure of the accompanying piano, revealing an intimacy of inner tenderness and anxiety, rather than athletic display.
Contrasting sculptural materials with a temporal performative presence, Faun grapples with the troubled pursuit for artistic perfection and speaks of the psychological vulnerability that is bound up in such ambition.
Poppy Bowers, Exhibitions Curator at the Whitworth, The University of Manchester
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John Snijders ‘Afternoon’ 2018
The composition “Afternoon” was created especially for the Nijinsky Project – Faun. I took, as base material, the piano reduction made by Leonard Borwick in 1914 of the orchestral work “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune”, composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918) in 1894. For “Afternoon” I have divided the piece into twelve sections, and chose one or two representative bars from each section. These bars were paired so that the piece now contains six structural parts, which do not always follow the original’s chronology. The order of the bars, repeated over and over again, was determined using chance operations. Arriving at a final basic structure, more chance operations were used to determine, bar by bar, if, and if yes, how many notes would be altered, going either up or down in pitch, but not altering the rhythm of the bars. This results in the material remaining recognisable, but slowly deteriorating and getting out of focus until the start of the next section, where the process will start all over again. The six parts relate to the six tables with Jane’s artworks, and the musical process mirrors Nijinsky’s slow descent into developing a more and more distorted mind.
John Snijders, Artistic Director of the Ives Ensemble, Associate Professor in Music Performance at Durham University.
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Jane Bustin, artist, lives and works in London and is represented by:
Copperfield London.
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Fox Jensen Sydney & Fox Jensen McCrory Auckland

Rebel Souls – A Trailer

In Art Fair, Art Rio, ArtRio, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Max Reinhardt, MIRA, Rebel Souls, Sound, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 26/09/2018 at 2:51 am

 

Rebel souls image

Rebel Souls

curated by David Gryn & Max Reinhardt

MIRA at Art Rio, 26-30 September 2018

TRAILER https://vimeo.com/291832957

Rebel Souls is the artists video and sound program for MIRA at Art Rio, curated by David Gryn, Daata Editions with sonic accompaniment from Max Reinhardt, musician, DJ and presenter of BBC Radio 3’s Late Junction.

Rebel Souls used as its artwork selection inspiration – artworks, sounds and ideas that emanated from the rebellious and radical zones of the 1970’s – from the discordant sounds and vision of the Female Punk Artists and the rhythms, anthems and spirit of Tropicalia. Like previous projects in Moscow, Miami and London, the Gryn and Reinhardt collaboration takes the form of an artist’s moving image curated compilation, using the music and sound within the artworks as a catalyst for developing a soundscape filled with music and sonic interventions that reflects on the selected artist video program.

http://artrio.art.br/mira

Artists: Adriano Motto, Alison O’Daniel, Anna Costa e Silva, Annie Bielski, Ayrson Heráclito, Bárbara Wagner & Benjamin de Burca, BasicaTV, Dora Longo Bahia, Felipe Cama, Fernando Velazquez, Gabriela Mureb, Gina Birch, Guy Oliver, Iain Forsyth & Jane Pollard, Igor Vidor, Kim Gordon, Kota Ezawa, Jeremy Couillard, Laleh Khorramian, Lenora de Barros, Maria Laet, Matt Stokes, Puck Verkade, Rä di Martino, Rosie Carr, Rosie McGinn, Thiago Martins de Melo, Thora Dolven Balke, Tin Ojeda, Tromarama, X Ray Spex

Galleries include: 303 Gallery, A Gentil Carioca / Galeria Marilia Razuk, Anita Schwartz Galeria / Millan, Cavalo, Central Galeria, Copperfield London, Daata Editions, Dürst Britt & Mayhew, Edouard Malingue, Fortes D’Aloia & Gabriel, Galeria Movimento, Kate MacGarry, Luciana Caravello Arte Contemporânea, September Gallery, Shulamit Nazarian, Galeria Superfície, UV, Vermelho, Workplace Gallery, yours mine & ours, Zipper.

Trailer/&sound by Jacob Gryn​
Image: Jeremy Couillard
http://daata-editions.com

Rebel Souls curated by David Gryn & Max Reinhardt for MIRA at Art Rio 2018

In Art Rio, Brazil, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Max Reinhardt, MIRA, Music, Rebel Souls, Sound, Uncategorized, Video on 14/09/2018 at 12:38 pm

Rebel Souls without Maria large screenshot

Rebel Souls curated by David Gryn & Max Reinhardt

MIRA at Art Rio, 27-30 September. Preview 26 September

http://artrio.art.br/

Rebel Souls is the artists video and sound program for MIRA at Art Rio, curated by David Gryn, Daata Editions with sonic accompaniment from Max Reinhardt, musician, DJ and presenter of BBC Radio 3’s Late Junction.

Rebel Souls trailer – https://vimeo.com/290254453

Rebel Souls used as its artwork selection inspiration – artworks, sounds and ideas that emanated from the rebellious and radical zones of the 1970’s – from the discordant sounds and vision of the Female Punk Artists and the rhythms, anthems and spirit of Tropicalia. Like previous projects in Moscow, Miami and London, the Gryn and Reinhardt collaboration takes the form of an artist’s moving image curated compilation, using the music and sound within the artworks as a catalyst for developing a soundscape filled with music and sonic interventions that reflects on the selected artist video program.

The collaboration is designed to add a flavour to the art fair and the city, aiming at creating a sound and visual identity for the fair whilst showcasing great artist digital, video, sound artworks.

Videos by artists include works by: Adriano Motto, Alison O’Daniel, Anna Costa e Silva, Annie Bielski, Ayrson Heráclito, Bárbara Wagner & Benjamin de Burca, BasicaTV, Dora Longo Bahia, Felipe Cama, Fernando Velazquez, Gabriela Mureb, Gina Birch, Guy Oliver, Iain Forsyth & Jane Pollard, Igor Vidor, Kim Gordon, Kota Ezawa, Jeremy Couillard, Laleh Khorramian, Lenora de Barros, Maria Laet, Matt Stokes, Puck Verkade, Rä di Martino, Rosie Carr, Rosie McGinn, Thiago Martins de Melo, Thora Dolven Balke, Tin Ojeda, Tromarama, X Ray Spex

Galleries include: 303 Gallery, A Gentil Carioca / Galeria Marilia Razuk, Anita Schwartz Galeria / Millan, Cavalo, Central Galeria, Copperfield London, Daata Editions, Dürst Britt & Mayhew, Edouard Malingue, Fortes D’Aloia & Gabriel, Galeria Movimento, Kate MacGarry, Luciana Caravello Arte Contemporânea, September Gallery, Shulamit Nazarian, Galeria Superfície, UV, Vermelho, Workplace Gallery, yours mine & ours, Zipper

A Talk: Treble Souls 
David Gryn & Max Reinhardt in conversation. Moderated by Gabriela Davies. Gryn & Reinhardt joined by Davies will discuss their collaboration between the film/video & music/sound programming.

Programmes, in order of play 

Both played on 26th
Part 1 played on 27th and 29th
Part 2 played on 28th and 30th

 

Rebel Souls – part 1 (2hrs)

Kota Ezawa – Beatles Über California

Dora Longo Bahia – Silver Session – Vermelho

Gina Birch – Feminist/Scream

Laleh Khorramian – Water Panics in the Sea – SEPTEMBER Gallery

Maria Laet – Pneuma I – Galeria Marilia Razuk

Matt Stokes – these are the days – Workplace Gallery

Puck Verkade – Bon Voyage – Dürst Britt & Mayhew

Ayrson Heráclito – senegal – Zipper

Básica TV – Parade – UV

Rosie Carr – The Fall and the British Museum

Guy Oliver – And You Thought I Was Bad?

Lenora de Barros – Calaboca – Anita Schwartz Galeria + Millan

Jeremy Couillard – Moonlight Sounds – Real Estate (Unofficial Music Video) – yours mine & ours

Anna Costa e Silva – Ofereço companhia / I offer company – Galeria Superfície

Kim Gordon – Proposal For A Dance – 303 Gallery, New York

Alison O’Daniel – The Deaf Club – Shulamit Nazarian

Annie Bielski – Trash Has Stories To Tell, Too – SEPTEMBER Gallery

 

Rebel Souls – part 2 (2hrs 20mins)

Rosie McGinn – Drums

Bárbara Wagner & Benjamin de Burca – Estás Vendo Coisas / You Are Seeing Things – Fortes D’Aloia & Gabriel

Básica TV – Bottoms Up! – UV

Felipe Cama – Imagens Surradas (Selfie) – Zipper

Gina Birch – In Love, Live

Laleh Khorramian – TITLE SONG – Bauch Bein Po – SEPTEMBER Gallery

X Ray Spex – 3 songs

Fernando Velazquez – Mindscapes#9, after Cajal – Zipper

Puck Verkade – Bang, Bang – Dürst Britt & Mayhew

Adriano Motto – Horror Horror – Cavalo

Rä di Martino – Poor Poor Jerry – Copperfield, London

Thora Dolven Balke – Simulator – Cavalo

Igor Vidor – Rio Olympics 2016 – Luciana Caravello Arte Contemporânea

Thiago Martins de Melo – Bárbara Balaclava – Cavalo

Gabriela Mureb – Sem Título – baba, mmmmm, Língua – Central Galeria

Tin Ojeda – New Age Let Down – Rio Version – Daata Editions

Iain Forsyth & Jane Pollard – File under Sacred Music – Kate MacGarry

Tromarama – Serigala Militia – Edouard Malingue Gallery

Social media:

@artrio_art

@daataeditions

@davidgryn

@imaxreinhardt

Hashtags:

#rebelsouls

#artrio

#daataeditions

#davidgryn

#maxreinhardt

http://artrio.art.br/mira

Artwork design: Jeremy Couillard with David Gryn/Daata Editions

Compilation: Andy Moss at Spike Island

Trailer: Jacob Gryn

https://vimeo.com/290254453

Phillip Birch – New Commission on Daata Editions – Office Shadow

In Art Basel, Art Video, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Lyles & King, Office Shadow, Phillip Birch, Uncategorized, Video, Video Art on 11/06/2018 at 12:46 pm

Office-Shadow-3 (Sisyphus Rock)

Daata Editions are excited to announce the release of Phillip Birch’s new commissioned artworks titled Office-Shadow (Personas). Birch has produced six short films that take place on a single floor of a computer generated office building. Each video acts as a single chapter of a longer narrative which is told through the point of view of a first person perspective.

Using this perspective, Birch (b. 1978, Detroit) is utilizing the language of video game design which allows the viewer to project themselves into the space as if they are themself the protagonist. The videos draw on Jungian psychology, the mundanity of office work, the visuals of Role Playing Games and the language of Greek mythology to create a world that is at once familiar and unfamiliar.

Birch is represented by Lyles & King and his recent solo exhibitions and performances include Milespires and Reliquaries, Lyles & King, NY; Entering God Mode, Jack Hanley, NY; The Crown of Modernity, 47 Canal, NY; The Hand of God, Essex Flowers, NY; The Chair After Its Method of Implementation, Cleopatra’s, NY.

TRAILER

Innovating the Future of Film in the Art World – David Gryn interview with Amy Tam – I AM FILM

In Amy Tam, Art Film, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Film, I AM FILM, Uncategorized, Video on 15/03/2018 at 10:03 pm
03_Krispy Kreme

Elliot Dodd, The Doctor, 2018

David Gryn is the founding director of Daata Editions, which aims to empower artists working with digital mediums, including video, sound and web via commissioning moving image and sound artworks by leading international artists. He has been the curator of the Film and Sound program at Art Basel in Miami Beach—the largest art fair in the world—for the last seven years.

For the 2018 edition of Independent New York, Sound and Video exhibiting in New York from the 8th-11th March, Gryn was selected to curate a series of artist-created video and sound experiences. The collaboration between Independent and Spring Place featured works by a range of international artists exploring digital mediums, including; Larry Achiampong, Lynda Benglis, BREYER P-ORRIDGE, Keren Cytter, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, David Lynch, Laurel Nakadate, Puppies Puppies, Torbjørn Rødland, and Saya Woolfalk.

I AM FILM Founder and CEO, Amy Tam, interviewed David to discuss Daata Editions and its unique business model, that is successfully supporting and commissioning video artists within the art world.

David, how would you describe Daata Editions (Daata)?

DG: It’s an online marketplace for moving image and sound artworks. My goal is to grow the audience and awareness for this medium, while allowing prospective buyers to access the artworks at any time, from anywhere. Daata has more than 70 artists, with over 300 artworks commissioned for the platform, and all works are released entirely online. The platform works with both leading and emerging artist talents, prominent curators, writers, collectors, art fairs, art magazines, and various art world collaborators including; Amalia Ulman, Takeshi Murata, Tracey Emin, Chloe Wise, Jon Rafman, Rashaad Newsome and many more.

 

Why did you choose to create this type of platform?

DG: Although it’s changing, the art market still tends to prefer object-based artworks. There’s a sense of resistance in galleries, auction houses, and art fairs; to normalise the type of works Daata commissions, because it’s unclear how to make them as commercial as more traditional mediums. People recognise that the industry is moving in this direction and they talk about it, but they won’t engage with it in its current position.

I’m trying to treat it as normally as a painting or sculpture now, instead of waiting for the “right moment.” It’s easy to show digital artworks online, so I started Daata as an answer to that problem. It was about how to encourage all the players—the institutions, the curators, the collectors, the audiences—to treat it more seriously. To me, the solution was the possibility of pushing forward one version of a marketplace, like you might open up a gallery, but online. It is a new way of distributing and showing artists’ moving image, sound, and web-based work. I didn’t realise I was ahead of the curve until I set it up.

How would you explain the way the Daata business model works?

DG: We pay the artists up front and then we distribute the artworks at a price, and we sell the work and give the artist a royalty. It’s inherently structured as a self-sustaining economy. Currently, it’s still philanthropic in its process, and we pay all the artists. If we haven’t paid an artist, we have an equal royalty share.

The business model is effectively saying there’s a value to this work. I’ve realised, to my chagrin, that almost everyone who treats art seriously generally does so when there’s a price point. Art that is for free is very difficult to quantify for almost everybody—other than the artist. I really do value art that isn’t necessarily commercial. But with Daata, I am trying to put forward a case that you can actually “have your cake and eat it, too.” You can have this work viewed and seen for free, and you can also collect it, buy it, and have the HD version for you to play whenever and on whatever device.

Works start at 100-200 dollars, and they go up incrementally until the maximum price of around 6000 dollars, in the video section. This method encourages early purchase, and the longer a work is for sale, the more it grows in value. We’re not trying to set up an auction model, a resale model, or a celebrity artist model. No matter how prominent the artist, the value starts out pretty flat across all parts of the site.

“I can’t base our website on the most famous, most money-making artist, because then it will start becoming a website dominated by the market forces. I wanted to make it a website dominated by the artwork and the artist.”

If you get in early, you can buy major artists and future major artists at a low price, which is exciting. With Daata, we’ve established A model, not THE model. It’s just one way of doing it.

Do you think artists or gallerists (decision-makers) have more power in the sale of art today?

DG: The power of the art fair is dominant. It’s very tilted towards the market position of what pays and drives an art fair’s business model. Galleries are trying to take things into their own hands to change it, but it’s hard. The problem with the relationship with the auction house and the art fair is; it tilts it to top dollar profit, whereas, if you’re supporting all sorts of artists in your gallery business model, you’re interested in the artist and the outcomes—it’s not always about how much money each artist makes.

It’s about how you put that work into a museum and how you grow that artist’s career. That’s often the gallery’s investment—time and costs, and that’s shattered by the art fair model, with many art fairs happening almost every month. Some galleries don’t operate with a great brain anymore, because they have to keep reacting to the next art fairs. The art world needs to alter and turn on its axis better.

Do you think the resistance in the marketplace comes from insufficient demand for these types of works or from the entities controlling what’s available—like art fairs and galleries?

DG: I think it has to be treated as a central cornerstone of an art fair, not as a hidden away sideshow. In my role as Curator of Film & Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach, I work very closely with Art Basel to try and make showing artists moving image and sound, very large and dynamic—luckily, they understand the need to empower the medium.

How does Daata fit into this context?

DG: I think there needs to be many outlets like Daata who can put their resources into supporting artists who make work, and distribute it. I keep coming across entities who want to take over the world, and I just want to take over the project I’m doing and make it the best I possibly can, within finite boundaries and borders. I don’t see what I’m doing with Daata as better or hierarchical, I just see it as being part of an art world jigsaw puzzle.

What has the demand been like in terms of sales of works?

DG: It’s great, it just needs to be more. It’s currently more sales than I’ve ever made in my part of the art world before. But to actually get to a point where there is more revenue to pay the next round of artists and not needing seed funding, it’s still got a couple of years to go. I saw the first two to three years as building and positioning within the art world. I have conversations with certain collectors repeatedly, some people are buying anonymously. There have been some people starting to buy the work more regularly that I don’t know, and they’re coming back.

How has the artist response been in terms of outcomes for the artists commissioned?

DG: The brief for making the artwork is very open and aims to enable the artist to take risk and be experimental. They have said we’ve made them feel more like they’ve been able to try out new things, and that’s been a nice challenge for some artists. They’ve said it’s informed much of their next body of work. Many of them have been shown in artist exhibitions, galleries, museums and art fairs.

As a curator, how do you get introduced to artists?

DG: We don’t have applications. We’re aware of artists in the art world, because I get to see lot of new artists and artworks from art fair prospects, art galleries, artists and so on, and I always look. I also don’t know everything, so it’s also a lot of word of mouth. In the ecosystem of artists, curators, and collectors—we trust each other’s opinions. Not all artists are the right ones for this kind of project. It isn’t a platform for a Hollywood filmmaker to dabble in making an artwork, unless they consider themselves an artist and they’re in the artist/art world ecosystem. It isn’t a platform for all.

However, there’s always room for the quirky collaboration. I have just started distributing a virtual reality project, that is working with several artists to make a composite VR artwork with several different artists in it. We’re willing to take that risk with certain people and projects —as I need to dip my toe into unchartered territories sometimes, just to keep things fresh and open to new potentials.

What would you say have been the main challenges since you started Daata?

DG: My greatest challenge is creating an understanding that this is a very normal medium, and trying to communicate that. I would say everything is a challenge, so it’s exciting. That’s why I set this up—to make a difference within a medium. I try to have a balanced program between artists who are both males and females and across backgrounds. I think about that deeply, so it’s not just a trigger reaction process of signing up the artist who put their hands up first; that’s an easier and lazy way of operating in the art world.

In terms of unexpected positive outcomes, what have you learned in the last three years?

DG: There’s lots of positive things. I don’t see my work just about how great the outcomes are for me. It’s about a project that has the best outcomes for as many people in the process as possible, and that’s always been my interest. That’s where I’m happiest. I guess it’s like I’m always looking under the stone to see what’s there, to make things better. When I work with organisations as dominant as Art Basel, I still always look to see what could make them or my project better for all parties involved. The true and integrity driven people in the art world that I work with, understand collaboration and mutual support for each other. They realise that we’re in the same game together to enhance a better world for art world artists, audience activity, and cultural pursuit.

What is working or not working about the way things work in the film industry, and how is that in contrast or comparison to Daata?

DG: I see the artwork made by an artist as an artwork and the film work made by a filmmaker is a film work. I don’t see a hybridity and a way the two work together. I still say there are many great filmmakers who are great artists—but their art is making film, whereas, the artist makes artwork. An artist will generally make an artwork without a financial position and a filmmaker will probably not make a film unless it’s got funding.

However brilliant they are as filmmakers, a film doesn’t get made because of the costs of the production, whereas an artist can often make an artwork without anyone else involved. If you’re going to make an artwork, you’ve got to make it exist to be an artist. You can’t then call yourself an artist if you haven’t got an artwork. It just doesn’t add up.

In terms of how I work with artists in Daata: I commission based on the reputation of the artist and knowledge of their past work.

“I go into the process trusting the artist to deliver the artwork as they wish. I don’t need drawing boards and proposals, as I believe in the potential of the artist to make the best decisions for their work and aim for outcome that they demand of and for their work.”
I think there are so many filmmakers who are brilliant, and to cast doubt upon them for being an artist is wrong. Usually, I’d say they’re just a great filmmaker. There are just a few that go beyond just being a great filmmaker and I believe they are genuine artists. People like Andrei Tarkovsky, David Lynch, John Waters, and Sophia Coppola. Then, there are people who successfully cross mediums like Wim Wenders and Jim Jarmusch. Sometimes, the artist becomes the Hollywood filmmaker and can lose the strength of their moving image works as an artist. I think it’s hard once you have those budgets and the media spotlight to be the same brilliant artist. The value in an artist who works alone is often in the raw edges, the roughness and the idea generation. Once that dries out and is dominated by the sheen of wealth, it can lose the interest of the greater art world.

For further information on Daata Editions visit: http://daata-editions.com. You can follow Daata Editions on Instagram and Facebook (@daataeditions).

Follow I AM FILM on Instagram (iamfilmofficial). #IAMFILM and Join their list to receive news and views by the Masters of Film. 

https://www.iam.film/press/2018/1/7/david-gryn-interview

 

Happy Happy New Year 2018

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Elliot Dodd, Internet, Jillian Mayer, Lu Yang, Post-Internet, Table.Video, Uncategorized, Video, VR on 31/12/2017 at 5:22 pm
TheDoctor_promo_crop_ElliotDodd_2018

The Doctor by Elliot Dodd, 2018

 

Wishing you the Happiest and most Successful New Year 2018

Image: The Doctor by Elliot Dodd, a new Daata Editions commission available for viewing and acquiring in a few weeks.

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LuYang Interactive Hearse by Lu Yang 2017

Daata Editions Review of 2017

2017 was a fantastic year for us at Daata with so many amazing projects, artists commissions, exhibitions, art fair, gallery and museum collaborations.

Daata was curator of Film Cologne at Art Cologne, EXPO Sound at EXPO CHICAGO and exhibited at NADA New York, Sunday Art Fair London, PHOTOFAIRS Shanghai, Art Los Angeles Contemporary, Untitled Radio, Strangelove Film Festival. David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions curated his 7th Edition of Film & Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach.

Artists released by Daata in 2018 included: Jacky Connolly, Sue de Beer, Lu Yang, Jeremy Couillard, FlucT, Toby Ziegler, along with A-V curated by Amanda Schmitt featuring sound works by Maria Antelman, Alexandra Drewchin, FlucT, Marina Rosenfeld. NAUSEA VR curated and produced by Philip Hausmeier of Metaphysics VR, with artists Eddie Peake, Florian Meisenberg, Anne de Vries, Ruben Grilo, Jack Strange and Anna K.E. Zata Banks FRSA in Daata’s poetry section curated artists: Laura Focarazzo, Kate Jessop, C.O. Moed, Julian Scordato, Susanne Wiegner, Antoinette Zwirchmayr.

Daata has presented screenings, talks and events in collaboration with citizenM Hotels, Label Dalbin, Artspace, Artsy, Artload, A—Z, Kristiansand Kunsthall Norway, ARS 17 at KIASMA Museum Helsinki, M Woods Museum Beijing, MOUart Gallery Beijing, Zuecca Projects Venice, Vanity Projects NYC and Miami, Ludlow and Soho House New York & Chicago, ACE Hotels LA & Chicago, Freud Museum London, ZAP Shop and the Zabludowicz Collection.

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Day Off 3 by Jillian Mayer

Upcoming in 2018

2018 will be Daata’s busiest year ever, with fantastic collaborations scheduled on artists technology, video & sound projects with Independent New York, NADA New York, If So, What ? (the new tech meets art & design fair in Silicon Valley, San Jose), Art Rio, EXPO CHICAGO, PHOTOFAIRS Shanghai, Untitled Radio, Dalbin and their new table.video, Rhizome, citizenM Hotels, Vanity Projects NY & Miami, DKUK in Peckham, Art Night London, ICP NY and many many more.

Alongside many projects with leading global brands and exciting developments with VR and AR technologies. Daata is releasing many new artists in 2018, starting with Elliot Dodd, new Playlists, Curated projects and much much more ….

Image: Day Off 3 by Jillian Mayer / https://daata-editions.com/art/video/day-off-3

 

 

 

 

FlucT: The psychological thriller of Evidence, now on Daata Editions

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, FlucT, Performance, Uncategorized, Video on 22/10/2017 at 12:40 pm

FlucT – The psychological thriller of Evidence 

Now available to buy on Daata Editions

The subjects of these short texts feature FlucT. The table of contents is in itself hermetic. In 6 episodes, Monica & Sigrid traverse the psychological thrill within the manipulative isolation of a game. They flaunt evidence in the effective nature of capital as it sings the absurdity of our behavior and our performitivity. They include birdcages and bitches; the underlying systems that control us, warrior tactics toward empathy and the pregnancy of their relationship. The psychological thriller of Evidence can be considered a guidebook to the incessant questioning of reality that FlucT sees as the task of performance.

Monica Mirabile and Sigrid Lauren have been performing as FlucT since 2011, presenting a hybrid collaboration of radical choreography, confrontational performance art, collaborative practice and pure magic. Before entering into a performance, each individual places a spell of protection over each other, allowing themselves to push their physicality to the max while remaining mindful of their partner’s saftey. Their dance practice has been described as “violently intimate” and their performances often confront and challenge not only the space between their bodies, but between the performers and audience. Most works involve audio tracks designed by the artists, leading to a further intimacy and connection between the performance, performers, and audience. This work, “Main Tool as a Dummy,” reflects the rhythm and nonlinear narration of their performance work.

FlucT by Whitney Mallet in Cura magazine

 

Label Dalbin presents Table.Video at Design Miami/ Basel

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Design Miami, Design Miami Basel, Label Dalbin, Table.Video, Uncategorized, Video on 07/06/2017 at 9:44 pm

TABLE

Label Dalbin is proud to present videos from Daata Editions inside Table.Video at Design Miami/ Basel. This innovative table displays videos and images conceived by artists and uploaded by the user. It combines the classic function of furniture with a « digital canvas » of still and moving images in the heart of your living or exhibition space. 

Daata Editions commissions artist video, sound, poetry and web. This new and innovative way to collect art is designed specifically to be a native platform to a new generation of artists who work with moving image and sound. Limited edition artworks can be viewed and acquired as digital downloads.

Label Dalbin produces videos, installations, and performances at the interface between music and the visual arts for cultural institutions and private collections. Label Dalbin also conceives innovative audiovisual installation for interior design.

Visit Design Miami/ Basel
Booth C9, Hall 1 Süd, Messe Basel, Switzerland

From June 13th to 18th, 2017

More Info:

https://www.table.video/daata-editions

http://basel2017.designmiami.com/

Sue de Beer on Daata Editions

In Art Basel, Barcelona, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Film, LOOP, Marianne Boesky, Sue de Beer, Uncategorized, Video on 22/05/2017 at 4:01 pm

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Daata Editions has just announced the release of four new artworks by Sue de Beer specially commissioned for the platform.

This poem is me and it’s nothing but words about you I hope you like it (1 & 2)
Make up / sound test for a were-wolf film
(1 & 2)

Sue is a recent recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and is represented by Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York. Sue de Beer’s artwork release on Daata coincides with the LOOP Fair, Barcelona and Art Basel in June.

Khary Simon, a creative director and publisher based in New York, interviewed Sue de Beer on her 4 films for Daata Editions.

Are the films intended to be presented in a specific order?

No. They are separate but connected. I do watch them in the order of 1, 2, 3, 4. I cut them in the order of 1, 2, 3, 4. The first two naturally connect, and the last two naturally connect. So do 1 and 4. So do 2 and 3.

Is beauty fragile and or dangerous?

Yes. Fragile.

What about terror can be erotic or beautiful?

Everything.

Do you cherish objects of girlhood or wish we did?

Yes.

What is the origin of titles 1 and 2?

This poem is me
and it’s nothing but
words about you
I hope you like it

It’s from a Dennis Cooper poem – one that he contributed to my first catalogue. I think it’s beautiful. Shifts around the watcher and the watched.

Sue de Beer’s work is located at the intersection between film and installation, sculpture and photography. Solo exhibitions include the Kunst Werke, Berlin, the Whitney Museum of American Art at Altria, the MuHKA Museum in Antwerp, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions in Los Angeles, The Park Avenue Armory, New York, as well as at Marianne Boesky Gallery.

The artworks start from $200. http://daata-editions.com

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