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Posts Tagged ‘London’

The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin

In Art Night, Art NIght London, Dancer, Film, Gryn, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, John Snijders, London, Marriot, Nijinsky, Poppy Bowers, Uncategorized, Video on 16/10/2018 at 2:33 pm
The Nijinsky project – installation assemblage pieces:
1933 bio Nijinsky by Romona Nijinsky, cloth, acrylic, porcelain, wood, steel
IMG_5446

Romola’s love

work by Jane Bustin

Relentless Hatred

work by Jane Bustin

Dark Moods

work by Jane Bustin

Hothouse plants

photo 1

Misfortunes

The Nijinsky project – Faun

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Premiered for Artnight London 2018 at London County Hall, Southbank London

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Jane Bustin
Isaac Gryn 
John Snijders
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Installation and performance – Vimeo 
Highlights – Vimeo
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Duration:
13 minutes.
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Introduction by Poppy Bowers
In 1912, Ballet Russes premiered L’Après-midi d’un Faune at Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris. Eschewing lyrical movement in favour of geometric shapes, its avant-garde choreography and sexually explicit content divided audiences, prompting both outrage and awe. The performance, now regarded as the first modernist ballet, was choreographed and performed by Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950), senior dancer of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes, and also his lover.
An iconic dancer, Nijinsky was experimental in his combination of great technical skill with deep, sensual expression. Over recent years, the artist Jane Bustin has made work in response to Nijinsky’s extraordinary formal experimentation. Like Nijinsky, Bustin is concerned with locating emotion within the restrained forms of geometric abstraction. Her pared-down paintings juxtapose panels of oil paint alongside tactile media such as porcelain, silk, copper or latex, to give sensory understanding to historical subject matter.
Faun is a new collaborative work that pays homage to Nijinsky’s tumultuous life. The work comprises of three parts; six table-mounted assemblages made by Bustin, a musical score by composer John Snijders and a balletic performance by the young dancer Isaac Gryn. The table works create a conceptual and spatial framework for the performative components, taking as its starting point a published book of Nijinsky’s life.
Following his ascendency as one who heralded the era of modern ballet, Nijinsky met misfortune. Having secretly married a young dancer, Romola, a furious Diaghilev subsequently expelled him from the Ballet Russes. Failing to recover from the artistic and financial loss of Diaghilev’s patronage, Nijinsky was forced to abandon dance. Suffering from psychosis he spent his remaining years residing in and out of asylums, until his death in Surrey, England. The account of his success and decline is recited in Nijinsky’s biography written by Romola and published in 1933, a single copy of which forms the centrepiece of each table assemblage.
Each book is accompanied by monochrome panels of various media including cloth, porcelain, paint and wood, the fragility of which point to emotionally-sensitive moments in Nijinsky’s life. From tallest to shortest, the tables take the following titles from a chance finding of a 1933 newspaper review that chart Nijinsky’s psychological trauma; Hothouse Plants, Relentless Hatred, Dark Moods, Misfortunes, “I am an Artist” and Romola’s Love. Typical of Bustin’s work, the proportions of the tables relate to the scale of the human body. Here, the table heights correspond to particular ballet movements measured from the young male dancer’s body, who is the artist’s son.
John Snijder’s musical score, titled Afternoon, was created specifically for this project. It reworks the piano piece of the original orchestral work for L’Après-midi d’un Faune composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), employing chance operations to unravel its structural order. Developed in dialogue between Bustin and Gryn, with support from Matthew Paluch and Dance Research Studio, a 13-minute dance, made in response to the music, is performed within the parameters of the tables. Combining symmetrical formations with lessening control, Gryn’s movements mirror the untangled composure of the accompanying piano, revealing an intimacy of inner tenderness and anxiety, rather than athletic display.
Contrasting sculptural materials with a temporal performative presence, Faun grapples with the troubled pursuit for artistic perfection and speaks of the psychological vulnerability that is bound up in such ambition.
Poppy Bowers, Exhibitions Curator at the Whitworth, The University of Manchester
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John Snijders ‘Afternoon’ 2018
The composition “Afternoon” was created especially for the Nijinsky Project – Faun. I took, as base material, the piano reduction made by Leonard Borwick in 1914 of the orchestral work “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune”, composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918) in 1894. For “Afternoon” I have divided the piece into twelve sections, and chose one or two representative bars from each section. These bars were paired so that the piece now contains six structural parts, which do not always follow the original’s chronology. The order of the bars, repeated over and over again, was determined using chance operations. Arriving at a final basic structure, more chance operations were used to determine, bar by bar, if, and if yes, how many notes would be altered, going either up or down in pitch, but not altering the rhythm of the bars. This results in the material remaining recognisable, but slowly deteriorating and getting out of focus until the start of the next section, where the process will start all over again. The six parts relate to the six tables with Jane’s artworks, and the musical process mirrors Nijinsky’s slow descent into developing a more and more distorted mind.
John Snijders, Artistic Director of the Ives Ensemble, Associate Professor in Music Performance at Durham University.
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Jane Bustin, artist, lives and works in London and is represented by:
Copperfield London.
&
Fox Jensen Sydney & Fox Jensen McCrory Auckland
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The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin – Art Night London at the Marriot, London County Hall – July 7

In Art Night, Art NIght London, Dancer, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, John Snijders, London, Marriot, Nijinsky, Uncategorized on 29/06/2018 at 12:44 pm
faun landscape1 copy
The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin. 
 
Art Night London 7 July 2018
An Installation and Performance featuring dancer, Isaac Gryn & pianist and composer, John Snijders.
Book your Free place here
 
The Nijinsky project – Faun
Saturday 7 July 2018

Installation and performance 

Artist: Jane Bustin
Dancer:  Isaac Gryn
Pianist: John Snijders
Music:  Afternoon, variation of Debussy’s “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune” by John Snijders

at

King George V Room
Marriott Hotel
London County Hall

Westminster Bridge Road
Southbank
London SE1 7BP

Performances: 
6.30pm, 7.30pm, 8.30pm
Duration: 13 minutes

Introduction by Poppy Bowers
In 1912, Ballet Russes premiered L’Après-midi d’un Faune at Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris. Eschewing lyrical movement in favour of geometric shapes, its avant-garde choreography and sexually explicit content divided audiences, prompting both outrage and awe. The performance, now regarded as the first modernist ballet, was choreographed and performed by Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950), senior dancer of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes, and also his lover.
An iconic dancer, Nijinsky was experimental in his combination of great technical skill with deep, sensual expression. Over recent years, the artist Jane Bustin has made work in response to Nijinsky’s extraordinary formal experimentation. Like Nijinsky, Bustin is concerned with locating emotion within the restrained forms of geometric abstraction. Her pared-down paintings juxtapose panels of oil paint alongside tactile media such as porcelain, silk, copper or latex, to give sensory understanding to historical subject matter.
Faun is a new collaborative work that pays homage to Nijinsky’s tumultuous life. The work comprises of three parts; six table-mounted assemblages made by Bustin, a musical score by composer John Snijders and a balletic performance by the young dancer Isaac Gryn. The table works create a conceptual and spatial framework for the performative components, taking as its starting point a published book of Nijinsky’s life.
Following his ascendency as one who heralded the era of modern ballet, Nijinsky met misfortune. Having secretly married a young dancer, Romola, a furious Diaghilev subsequently expelled him from the Ballet Russes. Failing to recover from the artistic and financial loss of Diaghilev’s patronage, Nijinsky was forced to abandon dance. Suffering from psychosis he spent his remaining years residing in and out of asylums, until his death in Surrey, England. The account of his success and decline is recited in Nijinsky’s biography written by Romola and published in 1933, a single copy of which forms the centrepiece of each table assemblage.
Each book is accompanied by monochrome panels of various media including cloth, porcelain, paint and wood, the fragility of which point to emotionally-sensitive moments in Nijinsky’s life. From tallest to shortest, the tables take the following titles from a chance finding of a 1933 newspaper review that chart Nijinsky’s psychological trauma; Hothouse Plants, Relentless Hatred, Dark Moods, Misfortunes, “I am an Artist” and Romola’s Love. Typical of Bustin’s work, the proportions of the tables relate to the scale of the human body. Here, the table heights correspond to particular ballet movements measured from the young male dancer’s body, who is the artist’s son.
John Snijder’s musical score, titled Afternoon, was created specifically for this project. It reworks the piano piece of the original orchestral work for L’Après-midi d’un Faune composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), employing chance operations to unravel its structural order. Developed in dialogue between Bustin and Gryn, with support from Matthew Paluch and Dance Research Studio, a 13-minute dance, made in response to the music, is performed within the parameters of the tables. Combining symmetrical formations with lessening control, Gryn’s movements mirror the untangled composure of the accompanying piano, revealing an intimacy of inner tenderness and anxiety, rather than athletic display.
Contrasting sculptural materials with a temporal performative presence, Faun grapples with the troubled pursuit for artistic perfection and speaks of the psychological vulnerability that is bound up in such ambition.
Poppy Bowers, Exhibitions Curator at the Whitworth, The University of Manchester

John Snijders ‘Afternoon’ 2018
The composition “Afternoon” was created especially for the Nijinsky Project – Faun. I took, as base material, the piano reduction made by Leonard Borwick in 1914 of the orchestral work “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune”, composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918) in 1894. For “Afternoon” I have divided the piece into twelve sections, and chose one or two representative bars from each section. These bars were paired so that the piece now contains six structural parts, which do not always follow the original’s chronology. The order of the bars, repeated over and over again, was determined using chance operations. Arriving at a final basic structure, more chance operations were used to determine, bar by bar, if, and if yes, how many notes would be altered, going either up or down in pitch, but not altering the rhythm of the bars. This results in the material remaining recognisable, but slowly deteriorating and getting out of focus until the start of the next section, where the process will start all over again. The six parts relate to the six tables with Jane’s artworks, and the musical process mirrors Nijinsky’s slow descent into developing a more and more distorted mind. 
John Snijders, Artistic Director of the Ives Ensemble, Associate Professor in Music Performance at Durham University.

Jane Bustin, artist, lives and works in London and is represented by Copperfield London
http://www.copperfieldgallery.com/

With special thanks to: Aida Bañeres Argilés, Poppy Bowers, Richard Grimes, Isaac Gryn, Jacky Lansey – Dance Research Studio, Will Lunn, Morley College – Ceramics Dept, Matthew Paluch, Aina Pomar – Copperfield London, Zarina Rossheart – Art Night London, Thornhill Pianos, John Snijders

Daata Editions at Sunday Art Fair

In Daata Editions, David Gryn, FlucT, Frieze, Jacky Connolly, Jeremy Couillard, Lu Yang, Sue de Beer, Sunday, Toby Ziegler, Uncategorized on 22/09/2017 at 9:54 pm

Sunday Fair

DAATA EDITIONS – a new mixtape

Launching the new FlucT, The psychological thriller of Evidence artworks for Sale online.

Presenting a new compilation mixtape featuring recent artist commissions and artwork releases on Daata Editions: FlucT, Jacky Connolly, Jeremy Couillard (curated by yours, mine & ours), Sue de Beer, Lu Yang, Toby Ziegler and artists sound works in A-V curated by Amanda Schmitt featuring artists: Maria Antelman, Alexandra Drewchin, FlucT and Marina Rosenfeld. 

See the Full Press Release – Daata Editions PR

SUNDAY
5—8 October 2017
Ambika P3, 35 Marylebone Rd, London, NW1 5LS
http://www.sundayartfair.com/ 

21462308_10154641354176621_190743586917054518_n

 

 

Keren Cytter – Terrorist of Love

In Andrew Goldstein, Artspace, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Frieze, Frieze Art Fair, keren cytter, Reading Room, Terrorist of Love, Uncategorized on 04/10/2016 at 10:43 am

daataxartspace_front_a6

Daata Editions and Artspace have co-commissioned a new video work, ‘Terrorist of Love’, by artist Keren Cytter, available for Free download on the Daata Editions website!

The work continues the New York based artist’s experimental filmmaking practice that subverts cinematic tropes, layers multiple fractured narratives, and reflexively refers to the medium. Tapping into a viral strain of humour found on Tumblr and GIF-sharing sites, the video is as chuckle-worthy, as it is contemplative.

Keren Cytter has exhibited extensively nationally and internationally, including: venues such as the Hammer Museum, New Museum, Whitney Museum, Guggenheim Museum, the 53rd Venice Biennale, Kunsthal Charlottenborg – Copenhagen and Kunst Werke – Berlin.

Download ‘Terrorist of Love’ for Free here!

Frieze London, Reading Room – the Daata Editions talk features: Keren Cytter in Conversation with Andrew Goldstein, Editor-in-Chief, Artspace.

Artspace Editor-in-Chief, Andrew M. Goldstein, will be in conversation with Keren Cytter, on her new video artwork ‘Terrorist of Love‘ and her filmic artwork practice, which picks apart genre conventions and other cinematic tropes with sly, dry wit.

Frieze Reading Room, Frieze London
Friday 7 October 2016
12.30pm – 1pm
More info:
frieze.com
artspace.com

 

 

More links:

Frieze Reading Room https://frieze.com/article/reading-room-frieze-london-2016

Facebook Event Page https://www.facebook.com/events/1608517026108863/

FAD Magazine http://fadmagazine.com/2016/09/29/daata-editions/

Cultural Traffic http://culturaltraffic.com/

Daata Editions News – Frieze Art Fair Week 2016

In artie vierkant, Artspace, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, David Risley Gallery, Frieze, Frieze Art Fair, keren cytter, new contemporaries, Uncategorized on 01/10/2016 at 10:30 am

 

frieze-daata-postcard-image

DAATA EDITIONS PRESS RELEASE 
FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEK – LONDON 2016

Daata Editions will be launching new artworks online and at Frieze London in the Reading Room, featuring artists: Keren Cytter, Melanie Eckersley, Hannah Ford, Ed Fornieles, Jasmine Johnson, Scott Lyman, Scott Mason, Ariana Reines, Daniel Swan, Abri de Swardt, Artie Vierkant. 

Daata Editions is collaborating with New Contemporaries, Gutter Records, Elephant MagazinePOSTmatter / WeTransfer (featuring Saya Woolfalk), FAD, alongside a co-commission project with Artspace launching with a new video work by artist Keren Cytter called ‘Terrorist of Love’ which will be available for FREE download via both websites. A new ‘Curated’ section is now live on the platform, through which guest curators will introduce new artists’ works on the website, launching with Katherine Finerty as curator and introducing artist Phoebe Boswell to the Daata platform. New York based curator and writer Lindsay Howard has written the new foreword to the website. Daata is screening selected new artworks at Cultural Traffic, a new print publishing arts fair.

https://daata-editions.com/
http://artspace.com
https://frieze.com/article/reading-room-frieze-london-2016
http://culturaltraffic.com/
http://postmatter.com/

Art Meets Tech: The Democratisation of Art an article by Moira Benigson: http://thembsgroup.co.uk/internal/art-meets-tech-the-democratisation-of-art/

Frieze London, Reading Room
Daata Editions will be screening newly commissioned artworks at Frieze London’s Reading Room, October 6 – 9 2016, by artists Ed Fornieles, Ariana Reines, Daniel Swan, Artie Vierkant and Keren Cytter.

New Contemporaries
Daata Editions will also feature new commissioned artworks by artists selected by New Contemporaries, artists include: Melanie Eckersley, Hannah Ford, Jasmine Johnson, Scott Lyman, Scott Mason, Abri de Swardt.

 

Daata Editions & Artspace co-commission

Daata x Artspace Commissions: Keren Cytter, Terrorist of Love, 2016:                          Daata Editions and Artspace have collaborated to co-commission a video work by the artist Keren Cytter, which will be available for FREE download from Tuesday Oct 4 & Wednesday Oct 5 on both websites.

Daata Editions will host a talk at Frieze London Reading Room, on Friday 7 October, 12.30pm with artist Keren Cytter and Andrew Goldstein, Editor in Chief, Artspace, in conversation. https://www.facebook.com/events/1608517026108863/

Artspace will be screening Terrorist of Love at Sunday Art Fair, 6-9 October at Ambika P3

Frieze Art Fair, London
https://frieze.com/article/reading-room-frieze-london-2016

Artspace @ Sunday Art Fair
http://www.artspace.com
http://www.sundayartfair.com/

 

More Info
Daata Editions and Artspace are delighted to announce the offer of a new co-commissioned video work by Keren Cytter as a downloadable collectible edition, free of charge. The video entitled ‘Terrorist of Love’ continues the New York based artist’s experimental filmmaking practice that subverts cinematic tropes, layers multiple fractured narratives, and reflexively refers to the medium. Tapping into a viral strain of humour found on Tumblr and GIF-sharing sites, the video is as chuckle-worthy as it is contemplative. Using a fixed 4K camera, Cytter shot the video in one take, before devising an unconventional music video format in post-production using key framing, meme-like imagery, and an original soundtrack—an unprecedented approach to video-making in any genre.

 

Lindsay Howard a text for Daata Editions
Curator Lindsay Howard will contribute in the Foreword section of Daata Editions, presenting a text on the platform and the new artworks release. The text will become available to read online together with the launch of the new artworks during Frieze London. https://daata-editions.com/info/foreword

 

daata-x-cultural-traffic

Daata Editions at Cultural Traffic
A New Print Publishing Arts Fair

CULTURAL TRAFFIC is launched by editor, designer and collector Toby Mott who says: “CULTURAL TRAFFIC is a fascinating window into the flourishing post-digital zine scene”.
Daata will screen works by: Keren Cytter, Ed Fornieles, Ariana Reines, Daniel Swan, Artie Vierkant / New Contemporaries selects Melanie Eckersley, Hannah Ford, Jasmine Johnson, Scott Lyman, Scott Mason, Abri de Swardt (all released at Frieze London) / Larry Achiampong, Casey Jane Ellison, Rashaad Newsome, Tameka Norris, Saya Woolfalk / Gutter Records has selected Jake Chapman, Graham Dolphin, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen (all released at EXPO Chicago)

CULTURAL TRAFFIC: Friday/Saturday 7–8th October 2016.
Juju’s Bar & Stage, Old Truman Brewery, Ely’s Yard, 15 Hanbury Street, London, E1 6QR
For further info contact: culturaltraffic@gmail.com
http://www.culturaltraffic.com
New Curated section on Daata Editions website
We are excited to announce the launch of a new section on the website, titled ‘Curated’ through which Daata Editions will invite guest curators to introduce new artists’ works on the website. The curators will be asked to make a selection of Daata Editions artworks as well as present works by other artists, in a way that facilitates the artistic conversation and creates a dialogue between the platform and various contemporary art practices.

Our inaugural curator is Katherine Finerty, who presents works by Daata Editions artists Tameka Norris and Rashaad Newsome, alongside a video artwork by Phoebe Boswell. All of these works address interrogating identity politics through a digital confessional portrait of sorts, employing sound, communication and voice (from inflection and cadence to signification and representation) to challenge stereotypes, double consciousness, and modes of self expression / storytelling. The Curated section launched online during EXPO Chicago, September 22 – 25.

EXPO Chicago
Daata Editions participated at EXPO CHICAGO, the International Exposition of Contemporary & Modern Art, September 22 – 25 presenting newly commissioned artworks by Daata Editions artists: Larry Achiampong, Casey Jane Ellison, Rashaad Newsome, Tameka Norris, Saya Woolfalk.
In addition, Daata Editions has commissioned Gutter Records, a record store and label for music made by artists based at David Risley Gallery, Copenhagen, to select artists for the Daata Editions website. Gutter Records has selected Jake Chapman, Graham Dolphin, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, whose works for the platform were also presented during the fair.

The newly launched artworks were joined by other recently released artists on Daata, including: Sofie Alsbo, Thora Dolven Balke, Tracey Emin, Michael Manning, Rashaad Newsome (sound works), Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Jacolby Satterwhite, John Skoog, Katie Torn and bitforms gallery selects Sara Ludy, Jonathan Monaghan and Quayola.

 

saya-woolfalk-color-mixing-machine-6-web

Saya Woolfalk – Colour Mixing Machine

POSTmatter Collaboration
We are excited to announce our collaboration with the digital publication POSTmatter and the file sharing online platform WeTransfer, for the launch of Saya Woolfalk’s commission for Daata Editions, collectively titled ‘Color Mixing Machine’.

Saya Woolfalk’s works went online at Daata Editions on Thursday 8 September to coincide with the launch of a custom-made wallpaper created by the artist and presented by Daata Editions and POSTmatter on WeTransfer. In addition, POSTmatter presented an interview with the artist, focusing on her practice, which spans from performance to digital practices, and the Emphatics, her fictional future female species.

Saya Woolfalk’s ‘Color Mixing Machine’ series formed part of Daata Editions presentation at EXPO Chicago, September 22 – 25, with a solo screen installation in the main fair. In addition, POSTmatter will present the works in the launching party of its redesigned site and first online issue ‘New Mythologies’ in London on September 29th at Second Home London Fields.

Saya Woolfalk’s works on Daata Editions:
http://daata-editions.com

Saya Woolfalk POSTmatter interview:
http://postmatter.com

There is Much More Exciting News, Announcements & Adventures coming very soon …

Jane Bustin – Rehearsal review in Saturation Point

In Copperfield, Jane Bustin, Laurence Noga, London, Nijinsky, Saturation Point, Uncategorized on 13/05/2016 at 12:25 pm

Jane Bustin: Rehearsal at Copperfield Gallery, London

16 March – 20 May 2016

A review by Laurence Noga

http://www.saturationpoint.org.uk/

“The systems approach is compatible with the evidence that human decisions are largely based on an intuitive feeling of rightness – Rechtsgefuhl – but seeks to validate this subjective feeling by a massive information input, which stands in true correspondence with reality before being refracted through the unconscious.” Jeffrey Steele (Systems, Arts Council 1972-3)

Jane Bustin’s material approaches allow an open system, without a hierarchy. They include: fresco techniques; oil-washed aluminium; acrylic panel painting with ceramic glazes; mirrored copper with latex; polyurethane; wood; copper; silk; paper; gesso; ceramics and ready-made objects

Together, the artist’s relaxed sense of geometry evident in her idiosyncratic solo exhibition, Rehearsal, at the Copperfield Gallery, her sense of rhythm, and her distinctive handling of material through assembly and editing, effect a powerful coercion on her audience.

Bustin works with a highly fragile phenomenology in her expanded approach to painting. This sense of ‘memorial’ is interwoven with techniques that are always meaningful, and which bring together a systematic emphasis on materiality with an intuitive proportional balance. Like Donald Judd, Bustin uses pairs as a single work. She is prepared to generate, or test, arbitrary oppositions in her approach to symmetry and asymmetry, combined with her technical virtuosity in surface facture. With Bustin the relationship between the artist and the object is always equal.

Jane Bustin: Faun, acrylic, polyurethane, copper pins, balsa wood, 50cm x 100cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

The influence of the Russian ballet star Vaslav Nijinsky (1890 – 1950) underpins her decisions here, as a dancer who exceeded the limits of traditional ballet. But this is a show with a more personal edge, not only because works like Faun (2015) are hung at the same height as Bustin’s son, who is also a dancer, but through her ongoing correspondence with the painter Jeffrey Steele. That conversation, in its lucidity and recognition of significant concrete events, combined with an understanding of the intimacy of human relationships (expressed in writers like Proust) casts a spell over the exhibition.

Jane Bustin: Spectre, acrylic, oil, wood, aluminium, 30cm x 35cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

Research, collaboration, and correspondence all seem to have equal weight in Bustin’s vivid shorthand of privacy and illusion. In her work Spectre (2015), Bustin’s line of enquiry synchronises the different surface qualities. She uses two adjoining panels to register an apparition with unequal time value. The painting’s assembly and colour decisions disturb that passage of time, allowing the colour, and its spatial depth, to register in the viewer’s subconscious. The side of this work interacts with the spectator, flickering enough colour peripherally to be visible as you view the front of the work. This phosphorescence attracts your curiosity, makes you look at the sides with equal scrutiny. The small deep red rectangle at the bottom corner of the Prussian/Ultramarine blue panel has an intense registration, played off the frontal white rectangle.

The manipulation of this structure calls to mind the relief constructions of Victor Pasmore, where the painted wood and plastic (e.g. Relief Construction in White, Black and Indian Red, 1961) is handled in an instinctive manner. I get right down underneath this picture to investigate the stained surface of the red /silver panel, but it’s the light green/red lines painted down its side, with a minute red rectangle at its base, which creates that relationship between form and substance.

Jane Bustin, Nijinsky’s Window, oil, acrylic, aluminium, porcelain, oxides, 30cm x 28cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

In one of Bustin’s conversations with Steele in 2014 they talked specifically about Proust’s Remembrance of Things Past. That sense of insight feels embedded into Bustin’s operations and assemblage. Nijinsky’s Window (2015), 30 x 28 cm, oil, acrylic, aluminium, porcelain, oxides, has a bodily emphasis in the handling of the surface facture, but the power and strength of the dancer feels unbalanced, perhaps alluding to Nijinsky’s social awkwardness. The thin, slightly inflated porcelain ceramic feels torn and dysfunctional, hinting at Nijinsky’s fragile mental health just after the First World War. The in-between space has the most concentrated red/gold oxide colour which filters out into the continuous undulating surface, echoing Morris Louis’ veiled paintings such as Mem (1959), allowing the same sense of diffusion and enveloping of the viewer in the same moment.

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Jane Bustin, Rehearsal II, copper, acrylic, oxides, cloth, 80cm x 50cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

Rehearsal II (2015) is strategically persistent in its placement; the mirrored copper surface nags at our self-consciousness. This encounter catches the viewer off guard, stretching the neck adjusting their position. Nijinsky, in his score for L’Après-midi d’un faune, talks about this inclination of the head, a slight forward tilt. With Bustin we get the history (Robert Morris or Judd a reflection of polished metal) but we also experience the exhibition space or the rehearsal space. The cloths hung next to the work further extend the colour source. They pick up on the opaque colour used in tonal shifts on the side of the work. The cloths themselves are important to a more philosophical sense of system.

Jane Bustin, Nijinsky I, overall, acrylic, thule, polyurethane, wood, 28cm x 44cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

In the symmetrical work Nijinsky I , (2015) the use of opacity and transparency introduces real and virtual depth, with an internal compositional relationship. The work is sensual, psychologically charged. Bustin states that the materials include ‘thule’; this is a term used in medieval geography to denote an unknown place, beyond the borders of the known world. The light and its illusionism connect to a feeling of unreality. You start to notice the small white ceramic cloth, its connotations shifting the balance of the show, reminding me of the work of Joseph Beuys with his interest in different substances, and how they could be explored through spirituality and ecstasy.

Jane Bustin, Rose, Copper, oil acrylic, polyurethane. 30cm x 42cm, 2016. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

Rose (2015) draws our attention further towards the problems of construction. This work seems to have the greatest sense of a machine aesthetic. By this I mean that it impacts on the viewer through a sense of co-existence. Its visual power echoes both the machinery of the dancer, and the industrial impulse that drives the language of precision.

Nijinsky, like Steele, was a revolutionary. His use of symmetry and ‘sensual expression’ questioned the role of choreography, to the point where he became paranoid, even frightened of the other dancers in his company. Bustin explores this sense of vulnerability and subversive attitude by making her works objects of desire. Through a kind of dematerialisation, she invites recognition of the perceptual/ psychological/physical. The whole installation adds this extra dimension through a sensation of sound and movement. Its undulation and acceleration is dependent not only on the notion of sequence, but in its very intimate exploration of symmetry and resonance.

The strength of the show is its ability to engage us in a series of relationships which push the viewer towards a systematic/ syntagmatic order. That system has an elaborate complexity in which the conversation between language, literature, linguistics and logic combine. There is an inherent chain of reaction, which unwraps, for the spectator, a dialogue between concept and object. This multi-layered synthesis of art and life is backed up by Bustin’s understanding of a semiological approach, in which she is able simultaneously to induce a memorable sensation with a combination of generative and emotional processes in the real space.


The exhibition runs weekly, Wednesday – Saturday, 12 – 6pm until 20 May, 2016

©Copyright Patrick Morrissey and Clive Hancock.  All rights reserved.

Jane Bustin – Rehearsal at Copperfield London

In Copper, Copperfield, Jane Bustin, Nijinsky, Rehearsal, Uncategorized, Will Lunn on 28/02/2016 at 7:11 pm

 

Rehearsal II

JANE BUSTIN: REHEARSAL

Opens 16 March, 6-9pm

Runs weekly:
Wednesday – Saturday, 12-6pm until 6 May

Copperfield
6 Copperfield Street, London SE1 0EP
www.copperfieldgallery.com

+44 (0) 7845 594 549

Jane Bustin (b. 1964 Hertfordshire, UK) works within an expanded understanding of painting, mixing fresco techniques with oil washed aluminium, acrylic panel painting with ceramic and glazes, mirrored copper with latex, polyurethane and woven cotton.

Bustin’s solo exhibition Rehearsal presents a series of paintings that take Modernist Russian ballet icon Vaslav Nijinsky (1890 – 1950) as a central reference. For all the apparent poise and fragility of ballet, every worthy composition is bold in its own right, underpinned by immense strength. Similarly her paintings balance the fragility of millimetre thin ceramic, fabric and pale tones with hard edges, metal and vivid colour.

Reflection is inherent in the work due to the polished metal panels that recur in her compositions, but Bustin makes particular use of the edge of her works, reflecting light off carefully chosen colours and finishes to extend the composition onto the wall. These effects can only be appreciated by exploring the paintings in person, connecting her work with Nijinsky who only ever wanted his performances experienced first hand – never recorded.

Nijinsky pioneered a revolutionary use of symmetry and ‘sensual expression’ leading to a new era for modern ballet. In her own practice, Bustin explores the effects of balance, placement and dimension, but what intrigues her most about the dancer is his obsession with the idea that the audience ‘could feel him’. This bridges with Bustin’s eagerness to raise the emotional encounter with the artwork beyond the immediate and purportedly rational aims of Minimalism and Modernist Geometric Abstraction. In this sense, Rehearsal connects beyond Nijinsky to the wider thinking of the Belle Epoch (1870 – 1914); a new social order that favoured fresh modes of emotional expression within the arts in opposition to the ‘rational’ Enlightenment thinking.

Any reference to prior movements is critically interpreted by the artist on her own terms and the result of all this careful drawing together is work where nothing is arbitrary. Despite this, Bustin embraces a certain permeability that invites viewers to entertain their own perspectives, rather than fostering the kind of singular and absolute, dogmatic approach so often found in related Modernist movements.

click for more images

For a preview works list please email info@copperfieldgallery.com

Image: Rehearsal II (2015) cloth, acrylic, copper, oxides 100cm x 80cm overall

A Very Happy Artprojx New Year 2015

In ABMB, Art, Art Basel, Artprojx, DAA, David Gryn, Jane Bustin, Miami Beach, New York, Strangelove on 31/12/2014 at 2:57 pm
Charles Richardson - The Rehearsal

Charles Richardson’s ‘The Rehearsal’ screening in Soundscape Park at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2014

WISHING YOU

A VERY VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR

THE VERY BEST WISHES FOR A FANTASTIC NEW YEAR 2015

FROM DAVID GRYN, JANE BUSTIN, ARTPROJX …

https://davidgryn.wordpress.com

http://www.janebustin.com

https://www.artbasel.com/

http://instagram.com/davidgryn

http://instagram.com/artprojx

SHOW-OFF by LeandaKateLouise

In abstract, Art, artists, Jane Bustin, Martin Creed, Paintings, Sam Belinfante on 27/10/2014 at 5:59 pm

ShowOff_einvite_CARGO

Show-Off

Show-Off, a choreographing of artworks.

Artists:
David Batchelor, Sam Belinfante, Jane Bustin, Martin Creed, Blue Curry, Matthew Darbyshire, Rose Davey, Claire Dorsett, Iain Hales, Tess Jaray, Sam Kennedy, Rory McCartney, Bruce McLean, Zoe Mendelson, Paulina Michnowska, Lisa Milroy, Mali Morris, Rob Phillips, Heino Schmid and Tessa Whitehead, Phoebe Unwin, Vicky Wright, Sarah Kate Wilson, Rose Wylie, Joel Wyllie.

8th and 9th November, 7.30pm
Doors close 7.30pm – no late admittance.
Location: Battersea, London. Address details will be sent to you upon rsvp-ing. rsvp to info@leandakatelouise.com

Show-Off aims to mobilise sculptures, paintings, drawings and performances in front of a seated audience, physically bringing a procession of works to directly ‘meet’ the onlookers rather than the viewer activating the work through their own movements in space.

Conjuring ideas of a catwalk, cattle market, debutant ball and auction house, art handlers will carry or direct each work on stage one by one to ‘show them off’. Each work will be professionally lit and illuminated for a limited time before being carried off stage.

The stage has been conceived and made by Gary Woodley as a design for flexible living. The stage can be reconfigured in a multitude of ways. Individual plywood units can each be moved, stacked and rotated to house each artwork in a variety of ways.

Show-Off is born from a frustration with private views. Artworks provide a context for socialising which in turn obstructs the intention of artwork as viewed object.

A specially commissioned limited edition print by artist Rory McCartney will be available to purchase at the EXHIBITION PRICE of £50. A bespoke frame has been collaboratively designed by Rory McCartney and Gary Woodley. Framed prints will be available at the EXHIBITION PRICE of £250.

LeandaKateLouise present an on-going series of projects, designed to generate innovative ideas and exhibitions that challenge both LKL and the artists they work with. This exhibition is curated by Rose Davey and Sarah Kate Wilson as LKL.

http://www.leandakatelouise.com/filter/showoff

Barefoot Skank – a soundcloud reissue

In Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, David Blandy, David Gryn, Lone Pilgrim, Manasseh, Tate Britain, Whitechapel on 03/10/2014 at 1:42 pm

 

Barefoot Skank

From the Artprojx Archives – just for fun:

Artprojx Radio presents
the original soundtrack recording
Barefoot Skank
&
Barefoot Skank (Ark Dub Mix)
Produced and music by Manasseh
In Association with The Barefoot Lone Pilgrim / David Blandy
Executive Producer, David Gryn / Artprojx
2008 (Back in day)

Artprojx Dojo presents
The Barefoot Lone Pilgrim AKA David Blandy/Soul Seeker v
The Legendary Manasseh AKA Nick Manasseh/Dub Master

Live dub battle versions at: Artprojx Space, Tate Britain, Whitechapel Gallery

davidgryn.wordpress.com
www.artprojx.com