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Posts Tagged ‘Nijinsky’

The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin

In Art Night, Art NIght London, Dancer, Film, Gryn, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, John Snijders, London, Marriot, Nijinsky, Poppy Bowers, Uncategorized, Video on 16/10/2018 at 2:33 pm
The Nijinsky project – installation assemblage pieces:
1933 bio Nijinsky by Romona Nijinsky, cloth, acrylic, porcelain, wood, steel
IMG_5446

Romola’s love

work by Jane Bustin

Relentless Hatred

work by Jane Bustin

Dark Moods

work by Jane Bustin

Hothouse plants

photo 1

Misfortunes

The Nijinsky project – Faun

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Premiered for Artnight London 2018 at London County Hall, Southbank London

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Jane Bustin
Isaac Gryn 
John Snijders
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Installation and performance – Vimeo 
Highlights – Vimeo
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Duration:
13 minutes.
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Introduction by Poppy Bowers
In 1912, Ballet Russes premiered L’Après-midi d’un Faune at Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris. Eschewing lyrical movement in favour of geometric shapes, its avant-garde choreography and sexually explicit content divided audiences, prompting both outrage and awe. The performance, now regarded as the first modernist ballet, was choreographed and performed by Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950), senior dancer of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes, and also his lover.
An iconic dancer, Nijinsky was experimental in his combination of great technical skill with deep, sensual expression. Over recent years, the artist Jane Bustin has made work in response to Nijinsky’s extraordinary formal experimentation. Like Nijinsky, Bustin is concerned with locating emotion within the restrained forms of geometric abstraction. Her pared-down paintings juxtapose panels of oil paint alongside tactile media such as porcelain, silk, copper or latex, to give sensory understanding to historical subject matter.
Faun is a new collaborative work that pays homage to Nijinsky’s tumultuous life. The work comprises of three parts; six table-mounted assemblages made by Bustin, a musical score by composer John Snijders and a balletic performance by the young dancer Isaac Gryn. The table works create a conceptual and spatial framework for the performative components, taking as its starting point a published book of Nijinsky’s life.
Following his ascendency as one who heralded the era of modern ballet, Nijinsky met misfortune. Having secretly married a young dancer, Romola, a furious Diaghilev subsequently expelled him from the Ballet Russes. Failing to recover from the artistic and financial loss of Diaghilev’s patronage, Nijinsky was forced to abandon dance. Suffering from psychosis he spent his remaining years residing in and out of asylums, until his death in Surrey, England. The account of his success and decline is recited in Nijinsky’s biography written by Romola and published in 1933, a single copy of which forms the centrepiece of each table assemblage.
Each book is accompanied by monochrome panels of various media including cloth, porcelain, paint and wood, the fragility of which point to emotionally-sensitive moments in Nijinsky’s life. From tallest to shortest, the tables take the following titles from a chance finding of a 1933 newspaper review that chart Nijinsky’s psychological trauma; Hothouse Plants, Relentless Hatred, Dark Moods, Misfortunes, “I am an Artist” and Romola’s Love. Typical of Bustin’s work, the proportions of the tables relate to the scale of the human body. Here, the table heights correspond to particular ballet movements measured from the young male dancer’s body, who is the artist’s son.
John Snijder’s musical score, titled Afternoon, was created specifically for this project. It reworks the piano piece of the original orchestral work for L’Après-midi d’un Faune composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), employing chance operations to unravel its structural order. Developed in dialogue between Bustin and Gryn, with support from Matthew Paluch and Dance Research Studio, a 13-minute dance, made in response to the music, is performed within the parameters of the tables. Combining symmetrical formations with lessening control, Gryn’s movements mirror the untangled composure of the accompanying piano, revealing an intimacy of inner tenderness and anxiety, rather than athletic display.
Contrasting sculptural materials with a temporal performative presence, Faun grapples with the troubled pursuit for artistic perfection and speaks of the psychological vulnerability that is bound up in such ambition.
Poppy Bowers, Exhibitions Curator at the Whitworth, The University of Manchester
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John Snijders ‘Afternoon’ 2018
The composition “Afternoon” was created especially for the Nijinsky Project – Faun. I took, as base material, the piano reduction made by Leonard Borwick in 1914 of the orchestral work “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune”, composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918) in 1894. For “Afternoon” I have divided the piece into twelve sections, and chose one or two representative bars from each section. These bars were paired so that the piece now contains six structural parts, which do not always follow the original’s chronology. The order of the bars, repeated over and over again, was determined using chance operations. Arriving at a final basic structure, more chance operations were used to determine, bar by bar, if, and if yes, how many notes would be altered, going either up or down in pitch, but not altering the rhythm of the bars. This results in the material remaining recognisable, but slowly deteriorating and getting out of focus until the start of the next section, where the process will start all over again. The six parts relate to the six tables with Jane’s artworks, and the musical process mirrors Nijinsky’s slow descent into developing a more and more distorted mind.
John Snijders, Artistic Director of the Ives Ensemble, Associate Professor in Music Performance at Durham University.
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Jane Bustin, artist, lives and works in London and is represented by:
Copperfield London.
&
Fox Jensen Sydney & Fox Jensen McCrory Auckland

The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin – Art Night London at the Marriot, London County Hall – July 7

In Art Night, Art NIght London, Dancer, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, John Snijders, London, Marriot, Nijinsky, Uncategorized on 29/06/2018 at 12:44 pm
faun landscape1 copy
The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin. 
 
Art Night London 7 July 2018
An Installation and Performance featuring dancer, Isaac Gryn & pianist and composer, John Snijders.
Book your Free place here
 
The Nijinsky project – Faun
Saturday 7 July 2018

Installation and performance 

Artist: Jane Bustin
Dancer:  Isaac Gryn
Pianist: John Snijders
Music:  Afternoon, variation of Debussy’s “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune” by John Snijders

at

King George V Room
Marriott Hotel
London County Hall

Westminster Bridge Road
Southbank
London SE1 7BP

Performances: 
6.30pm, 7.30pm, 8.30pm
Duration: 13 minutes

Introduction by Poppy Bowers
In 1912, Ballet Russes premiered L’Après-midi d’un Faune at Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris. Eschewing lyrical movement in favour of geometric shapes, its avant-garde choreography and sexually explicit content divided audiences, prompting both outrage and awe. The performance, now regarded as the first modernist ballet, was choreographed and performed by Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950), senior dancer of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes, and also his lover.
An iconic dancer, Nijinsky was experimental in his combination of great technical skill with deep, sensual expression. Over recent years, the artist Jane Bustin has made work in response to Nijinsky’s extraordinary formal experimentation. Like Nijinsky, Bustin is concerned with locating emotion within the restrained forms of geometric abstraction. Her pared-down paintings juxtapose panels of oil paint alongside tactile media such as porcelain, silk, copper or latex, to give sensory understanding to historical subject matter.
Faun is a new collaborative work that pays homage to Nijinsky’s tumultuous life. The work comprises of three parts; six table-mounted assemblages made by Bustin, a musical score by composer John Snijders and a balletic performance by the young dancer Isaac Gryn. The table works create a conceptual and spatial framework for the performative components, taking as its starting point a published book of Nijinsky’s life.
Following his ascendency as one who heralded the era of modern ballet, Nijinsky met misfortune. Having secretly married a young dancer, Romola, a furious Diaghilev subsequently expelled him from the Ballet Russes. Failing to recover from the artistic and financial loss of Diaghilev’s patronage, Nijinsky was forced to abandon dance. Suffering from psychosis he spent his remaining years residing in and out of asylums, until his death in Surrey, England. The account of his success and decline is recited in Nijinsky’s biography written by Romola and published in 1933, a single copy of which forms the centrepiece of each table assemblage.
Each book is accompanied by monochrome panels of various media including cloth, porcelain, paint and wood, the fragility of which point to emotionally-sensitive moments in Nijinsky’s life. From tallest to shortest, the tables take the following titles from a chance finding of a 1933 newspaper review that chart Nijinsky’s psychological trauma; Hothouse Plants, Relentless Hatred, Dark Moods, Misfortunes, “I am an Artist” and Romola’s Love. Typical of Bustin’s work, the proportions of the tables relate to the scale of the human body. Here, the table heights correspond to particular ballet movements measured from the young male dancer’s body, who is the artist’s son.
John Snijder’s musical score, titled Afternoon, was created specifically for this project. It reworks the piano piece of the original orchestral work for L’Après-midi d’un Faune composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), employing chance operations to unravel its structural order. Developed in dialogue between Bustin and Gryn, with support from Matthew Paluch and Dance Research Studio, a 13-minute dance, made in response to the music, is performed within the parameters of the tables. Combining symmetrical formations with lessening control, Gryn’s movements mirror the untangled composure of the accompanying piano, revealing an intimacy of inner tenderness and anxiety, rather than athletic display.
Contrasting sculptural materials with a temporal performative presence, Faun grapples with the troubled pursuit for artistic perfection and speaks of the psychological vulnerability that is bound up in such ambition.
Poppy Bowers, Exhibitions Curator at the Whitworth, The University of Manchester

John Snijders ‘Afternoon’ 2018
The composition “Afternoon” was created especially for the Nijinsky Project – Faun. I took, as base material, the piano reduction made by Leonard Borwick in 1914 of the orchestral work “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune”, composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918) in 1894. For “Afternoon” I have divided the piece into twelve sections, and chose one or two representative bars from each section. These bars were paired so that the piece now contains six structural parts, which do not always follow the original’s chronology. The order of the bars, repeated over and over again, was determined using chance operations. Arriving at a final basic structure, more chance operations were used to determine, bar by bar, if, and if yes, how many notes would be altered, going either up or down in pitch, but not altering the rhythm of the bars. This results in the material remaining recognisable, but slowly deteriorating and getting out of focus until the start of the next section, where the process will start all over again. The six parts relate to the six tables with Jane’s artworks, and the musical process mirrors Nijinsky’s slow descent into developing a more and more distorted mind. 
John Snijders, Artistic Director of the Ives Ensemble, Associate Professor in Music Performance at Durham University.

Jane Bustin, artist, lives and works in London and is represented by Copperfield London
http://www.copperfieldgallery.com/

With special thanks to: Aida Bañeres Argilés, Poppy Bowers, Richard Grimes, Isaac Gryn, Jacky Lansey – Dance Research Studio, Will Lunn, Morley College – Ceramics Dept, Matthew Paluch, Aina Pomar – Copperfield London, Zarina Rossheart – Art Night London, Thornhill Pianos, John Snijders

The Nijinsky project – Faun by Jane Bustin – Art Night London – July 7

In Art Night, Art NIght London, BFI, Copperfield, Gallery, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, Jane Gryn, John Snijders, Marriot, Nijinsky, Uncategorized on 03/06/2018 at 4:43 pm

The Nijinsky project – Faun by Jane Bustin

A performance and installation featuring:

Dancer, Isaac Gryn

Pianist, John Snijders

Art Night London – July 7

King George V Room, Marriott, London County Hall, Westminster Bridge Rd, South Bank, London SE1 7PB

Faun is a performative installation by artist Jane Bustin, inspired by Nijinsky’s iconic work, the first modernist ballet, L’après-midi d’un faune. Bustin presents six artworks each featuring the 1933 biography of Nijinsky by his wife Romola. The live premiere performance conceived by the artist, features her son, dancer Isaac Gryn, alongside a deconstructed version of Debussy’s original composition, titled Afternoon, specially composed by pianist and artistic director of the Ives Ensemble, John Snijders, and will be played live. The installation explores themes of structure and geometry found within relationships of nature and nurture, perfection and failure. Alongside a publication text by curator Poppy Bowers.

Performances at: 6.30pm, 7.30pm and 8.30pm
running time: 13 minutes

Pre-registration required/walk-ins will be admitted depending on capacity

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-nijinsky-project-faun-by-jane-bustin-tickets-47239788479

http://2018.artnight.london/projects/jane-bustin/

http://www.copperfieldgallery.com/jane-bustin.html

https://www.marriott.co.uk |

Instagram @janebustin

Jane Bustin – Rehearsal at Copperfield London

In Copper, Copperfield, Jane Bustin, Nijinsky, Rehearsal, Uncategorized, Will Lunn on 28/02/2016 at 7:11 pm

 

Rehearsal II

JANE BUSTIN: REHEARSAL

Opens 16 March, 6-9pm

Runs weekly:
Wednesday – Saturday, 12-6pm until 6 May

Copperfield
6 Copperfield Street, London SE1 0EP
www.copperfieldgallery.com

+44 (0) 7845 594 549

Jane Bustin (b. 1964 Hertfordshire, UK) works within an expanded understanding of painting, mixing fresco techniques with oil washed aluminium, acrylic panel painting with ceramic and glazes, mirrored copper with latex, polyurethane and woven cotton.

Bustin’s solo exhibition Rehearsal presents a series of paintings that take Modernist Russian ballet icon Vaslav Nijinsky (1890 – 1950) as a central reference. For all the apparent poise and fragility of ballet, every worthy composition is bold in its own right, underpinned by immense strength. Similarly her paintings balance the fragility of millimetre thin ceramic, fabric and pale tones with hard edges, metal and vivid colour.

Reflection is inherent in the work due to the polished metal panels that recur in her compositions, but Bustin makes particular use of the edge of her works, reflecting light off carefully chosen colours and finishes to extend the composition onto the wall. These effects can only be appreciated by exploring the paintings in person, connecting her work with Nijinsky who only ever wanted his performances experienced first hand – never recorded.

Nijinsky pioneered a revolutionary use of symmetry and ‘sensual expression’ leading to a new era for modern ballet. In her own practice, Bustin explores the effects of balance, placement and dimension, but what intrigues her most about the dancer is his obsession with the idea that the audience ‘could feel him’. This bridges with Bustin’s eagerness to raise the emotional encounter with the artwork beyond the immediate and purportedly rational aims of Minimalism and Modernist Geometric Abstraction. In this sense, Rehearsal connects beyond Nijinsky to the wider thinking of the Belle Epoch (1870 – 1914); a new social order that favoured fresh modes of emotional expression within the arts in opposition to the ‘rational’ Enlightenment thinking.

Any reference to prior movements is critically interpreted by the artist on her own terms and the result of all this careful drawing together is work where nothing is arbitrary. Despite this, Bustin embraces a certain permeability that invites viewers to entertain their own perspectives, rather than fostering the kind of singular and absolute, dogmatic approach so often found in related Modernist movements.

click for more images

For a preview works list please email info@copperfieldgallery.com

Image: Rehearsal II (2015) cloth, acrylic, copper, oxides 100cm x 80cm overall

The London Open 2015 – a FAD Q&A with Jane Bustin.

In abstract, Art, Artist, FAD, Gallery, Jane Bustin, London Open, LondonOpen2015, Magazine, Minimal, painting, Whitechapel on 21/07/2015 at 12:34 pm
photo 3

Tabitha’s Cape 2014 by Jane Bustin

The London Open 2015 Q&A with artist Jane Bustin. A FAD Magazine Interview

The London Open Whitechapel Gallery’s triennial exhibition has just opened. 48 of the most dynamic and exciting artists have been chosen from an entry of over 2100 and this online interview comes from FAD Magazine …

1. Have you always felt yourself an artist?
Probably after the first week of art school when I realised you could actually just paint all day.

2. Can you tell us more about your work and what are the main ideas you would like to express?
I make abstract formal compositions reflecting on modernism and materiality. & I take influences from 14th century frescos, 15th century Dutch painting, iconography, modernist architecture and design, French modernist literature, dance, fabrics, books, hardware stores, Japanese ceramics, neon signs, cosmetics, sweet wrappers …

My main interest is to create a resonance within the work that goes beyond its material properties.

3. How do you start the process of making work?
The start of the work is always through the choice of materials.

4. Do you consider the viewer, when making your work?
Always and never, since I am primarily the viewer.

5. Name 3 artists that have inspired your work.
Masaccio

Vermeer

Rothko

6. What defines something as a work of art?
When you need to look again and again and something stirs in the pit of your stomach.

7. How was it finding out you had been chosen as part of The London Open?
Satisfying

8. How have you found working with the Whitechapel Gallery on the exhibition?
The curators and assistants have been superb, I have never before as an Artist in a large open exhibition felt so considered, involved and appreciated.

9. What plans do you have to continue to pursue your art career in 2015?
I am looking forward to exhibiting in November at the Ingleby Gallery, Edinburgh in a show ‘Resistance and Persistence’ based on an essay by Sean Scully on Giorgio Morandi, including works from both artists.

10. Final Question – if you had £49,000 to buy art who would you invest it in?
Women Artists over the age of 49!

www.janebustin.com

Get more details on The London Open: HERE

Whitechapel Gallery

77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Tube: Aldgate East 

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/

T +44 (0)20 7522 7888 

E info@whitechapelgallery.org

Twitter 

Facebook 

The London Open 2015

Galleries 1, 8 & 9

Mon: Closed

Tues, Weds, Fri, Sat, Sun: 11am–6pm

Thurs: 11am–9pm

The London Open 2015 at the Whitechapel Gallery

In abstraction, artists, East End, Jane Bustin, London, LondonOpen2015, Minimal, painting, The London Open, Whitechapel Gallery on 11/07/2015 at 9:13 am
Nijinsky's Window, 2015 by Jane Bustin

Nijinsky’s Window, 2015 by Jane Bustin

The London Open 2015

Whitechapel Gallery

15 Jul – 6 Sep 2015

The London Open 2015 is the Whitechapel Gallery’s triennial exhibition. Sculpture, painting, performance, moving image, photography, printmaking and many other media and practices, showcase some of the most dynamic work being made across the capital in 2015.

Artists: Rebecca Ackroyd, Holly Antrum, Ryuji Araki, Salvatore Arancio, Zehra Arslan, Alex Baczynski-Jenkins, Sam Belinfante, Karl Bielik, Isha Bohling, Jane Bustin, Jodie Carey, Ben Cove, Sam Curtis, Nelmarie Du Preez, Alexander Duncan, Tim Ellis, Adham Faramawy, Gaia Fugazza, Marco Godoy, Lothar Götz, Athene Greig, Buster Grimes, Mark Harris, Emma Hart, Dominic Hawgood, Mary Hurrell, Lucy Joyce, Dominic Kennedy, Sophie Mackfall, Damian Meade, Guy Patton, The Grantchester Pottery, Heather Power, Mary Ramsden, Sarah Roberts, Julie Roch-Cuerrier, Mitra Saboury, Lizi Sanchez, Laura Santamaria, Frances Scott, Eva Stenram, Tim Stoner, Roy Voss, Caroline Walker, Dominic Watson, Demelza Watts, Ben Woodeson, Madalina Zaharia.

From a record number of 2,133 applicants, these 48 artists were selected by a panel of art world figures, including writer and critic Ben Luke, artist Angela de la Cruz, collector Nicoletta Fiorucci, The Approach gallerist Jake Miller and Whitechapel Gallery curators Daniel Herrmann, Eisler Curator and Head of Curatorial Studies and Poppy Bowers, Assistant Curator.

Whitechapel Gallery

77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Tube: Aldgate East 

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/

T +44 (0)20 7522 7888 

E info@whitechapelgallery.org

Twitter 

Facebook 

The London Open 2015

Galleries 1, 8 & 9

Mon: Closed

Tues, Weds, Fri, Sat, Sun: 11am–6pm

Thurs: 11am–9pm

Other works in The London Open 2015 by Jane Bustin include: Tabitha’s Cape, Nijinsky 1

Jane Bustin currently has artworks in the RA Summer Show and at The Dot Project, 94 Fulham Rd, London