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Posts Tagged ‘Poppy Bowers’

The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin

In Art Night, Art NIght London, Dancer, Film, Gryn, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, John Snijders, London, Marriot, Nijinsky, Poppy Bowers, Uncategorized, Video on 16/10/2018 at 2:33 pm
The Nijinsky project – installation assemblage pieces:
1933 bio Nijinsky by Romona Nijinsky, cloth, acrylic, porcelain, wood, steel
IMG_5446

Romola’s love

work by Jane Bustin

Relentless Hatred

work by Jane Bustin

Dark Moods

work by Jane Bustin

Hothouse plants

photo 1

Misfortunes

The Nijinsky project – Faun

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Premiered for Artnight London 2018 at London County Hall, Southbank London

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Jane Bustin
Isaac Gryn 
John Snijders
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Installation and performance – Vimeo 
Highlights – Vimeo
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Duration:
13 minutes.
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Introduction by Poppy Bowers
In 1912, Ballet Russes premiered L’Après-midi d’un Faune at Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris. Eschewing lyrical movement in favour of geometric shapes, its avant-garde choreography and sexually explicit content divided audiences, prompting both outrage and awe. The performance, now regarded as the first modernist ballet, was choreographed and performed by Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950), senior dancer of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes, and also his lover.
An iconic dancer, Nijinsky was experimental in his combination of great technical skill with deep, sensual expression. Over recent years, the artist Jane Bustin has made work in response to Nijinsky’s extraordinary formal experimentation. Like Nijinsky, Bustin is concerned with locating emotion within the restrained forms of geometric abstraction. Her pared-down paintings juxtapose panels of oil paint alongside tactile media such as porcelain, silk, copper or latex, to give sensory understanding to historical subject matter.
Faun is a new collaborative work that pays homage to Nijinsky’s tumultuous life. The work comprises of three parts; six table-mounted assemblages made by Bustin, a musical score by composer John Snijders and a balletic performance by the young dancer Isaac Gryn. The table works create a conceptual and spatial framework for the performative components, taking as its starting point a published book of Nijinsky’s life.
Following his ascendency as one who heralded the era of modern ballet, Nijinsky met misfortune. Having secretly married a young dancer, Romola, a furious Diaghilev subsequently expelled him from the Ballet Russes. Failing to recover from the artistic and financial loss of Diaghilev’s patronage, Nijinsky was forced to abandon dance. Suffering from psychosis he spent his remaining years residing in and out of asylums, until his death in Surrey, England. The account of his success and decline is recited in Nijinsky’s biography written by Romola and published in 1933, a single copy of which forms the centrepiece of each table assemblage.
Each book is accompanied by monochrome panels of various media including cloth, porcelain, paint and wood, the fragility of which point to emotionally-sensitive moments in Nijinsky’s life. From tallest to shortest, the tables take the following titles from a chance finding of a 1933 newspaper review that chart Nijinsky’s psychological trauma; Hothouse Plants, Relentless Hatred, Dark Moods, Misfortunes, “I am an Artist” and Romola’s Love. Typical of Bustin’s work, the proportions of the tables relate to the scale of the human body. Here, the table heights correspond to particular ballet movements measured from the young male dancer’s body, who is the artist’s son.
John Snijder’s musical score, titled Afternoon, was created specifically for this project. It reworks the piano piece of the original orchestral work for L’Après-midi d’un Faune composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), employing chance operations to unravel its structural order. Developed in dialogue between Bustin and Gryn, with support from Matthew Paluch and Dance Research Studio, a 13-minute dance, made in response to the music, is performed within the parameters of the tables. Combining symmetrical formations with lessening control, Gryn’s movements mirror the untangled composure of the accompanying piano, revealing an intimacy of inner tenderness and anxiety, rather than athletic display.
Contrasting sculptural materials with a temporal performative presence, Faun grapples with the troubled pursuit for artistic perfection and speaks of the psychological vulnerability that is bound up in such ambition.
Poppy Bowers, Exhibitions Curator at the Whitworth, The University of Manchester
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John Snijders ‘Afternoon’ 2018
The composition “Afternoon” was created especially for the Nijinsky Project – Faun. I took, as base material, the piano reduction made by Leonard Borwick in 1914 of the orchestral work “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune”, composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918) in 1894. For “Afternoon” I have divided the piece into twelve sections, and chose one or two representative bars from each section. These bars were paired so that the piece now contains six structural parts, which do not always follow the original’s chronology. The order of the bars, repeated over and over again, was determined using chance operations. Arriving at a final basic structure, more chance operations were used to determine, bar by bar, if, and if yes, how many notes would be altered, going either up or down in pitch, but not altering the rhythm of the bars. This results in the material remaining recognisable, but slowly deteriorating and getting out of focus until the start of the next section, where the process will start all over again. The six parts relate to the six tables with Jane’s artworks, and the musical process mirrors Nijinsky’s slow descent into developing a more and more distorted mind.
John Snijders, Artistic Director of the Ives Ensemble, Associate Professor in Music Performance at Durham University.
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Jane Bustin, artist, lives and works in London and is represented by:
Copperfield London.
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Fox Jensen Sydney & Fox Jensen McCrory Auckland

The Nijinsky project – Faun by Jane Bustin – Art Night London – July 7

In Art Night, Art NIght London, BFI, Copperfield, Gallery, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, Jane Gryn, John Snijders, Marriot, Nijinsky, Uncategorized on 03/06/2018 at 4:43 pm

The Nijinsky project – Faun by Jane Bustin

A performance and installation featuring:

Dancer, Isaac Gryn

Pianist, John Snijders

Art Night London – July 7

King George V Room, Marriott, London County Hall, Westminster Bridge Rd, South Bank, London SE1 7PB

Faun is a performative installation by artist Jane Bustin, inspired by Nijinsky’s iconic work, the first modernist ballet, L’après-midi d’un faune. Bustin presents six artworks each featuring the 1933 biography of Nijinsky by his wife Romola. The live premiere performance conceived by the artist, features her son, dancer Isaac Gryn, alongside a deconstructed version of Debussy’s original composition, titled Afternoon, specially composed by pianist and artistic director of the Ives Ensemble, John Snijders, and will be played live. The installation explores themes of structure and geometry found within relationships of nature and nurture, perfection and failure. Alongside a publication text by curator Poppy Bowers.

Performances at: 6.30pm, 7.30pm and 8.30pm
running time: 13 minutes

Pre-registration required/walk-ins will be admitted depending on capacity

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-nijinsky-project-faun-by-jane-bustin-tickets-47239788479

http://2018.artnight.london/projects/jane-bustin/

http://www.copperfieldgallery.com/jane-bustin.html

https://www.marriott.co.uk |

Instagram @janebustin

Jane Bustin, Fühler at Leslie, Berlin 22 June

In Art, Berlin, Ceramics, Copper, Copperfield, Gallery, Jane Bustin, Leslie, Paintings, Poppy Bowers, Uncategorized, Whitworth on 18/06/2017 at 11:41 am
3D work by Jane Bustin

Rehearsal II, copper, acrylic, oxides, cloth
80cm x 50 cm overall, Jane Bustin, 2015

Jane Bustin

Fühler

Opening: 22.6.17, 6 pm
Exhibition: 23.6.17 – 20.7.17

Leslie

Bergfriedstraße 20
10969 Berlin

http://lesliegallery.de/

Since the 18th century, European philosophers have distinguished our capacity to feel subjectively from our ability to think rationally. We are sentient beings. As the late neurologist and author Oliver Sacks claimed, ‘perception is never purely in the present – it has to be drawn on experience of the past’. Jane Bustin’s exhibition Fühler, to have feelers or sensors about a given subject, calls on this capacity.

Bustin’s approach to painting foregrounds a conscious experience of material surface and texture. Although abstract, her works are evocations of people and histories. They are grounded in a range of intellectual sources, primarily European modernist poetry, design and literature as well as theology and philosophy. Such concepts are given physical expression through her intuitive arrangements of materials. Oil, dyed silk, porcelain, woven cloth, polished copper, tulle and ceramic glazes are just some of the media used to give shape and feeling to philosophical ideas. Born out of the tactile, her works are Fühler; they are imbued with a sensory memory and resonate with emotion.

Four works in the show, Apres II, Nijinsky I, Nijinksy’s Windows and Rehearsal II, pay tribute to the radical Russian ballet dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinksy (1890-1950). Rising to prominence as part of the belle epoch, Nijinksy combined depth and intensity of expression with symmetry to pioneer new stylistic ideas in modern dance, echoed in the compositional balance of Bustin’s three textural diptychs.

In Après II textile becomes a stand-in for the body and the memory of its physical activity. It takes its cue from Nijinsky’s choreography of the ballet L’apres midi d’un Faun in 1912, where the movement of fabric is used as a metaphor for sexual desire and physical exhaustion. Like most of Bustin’s works the scale is of human proportions. Hung quite low, Apres II sits on the wall around the height of the artist’s heart.

Elsewhere, earlier works in the exhibition include Christina the Astonishing, part of a series referencing the iconography of female saints and Tablet I, Tablet III and Tablet IV, evoking archaic forms of communication. Combining sheets of paper from both old and new notebooks, they prompt memories of the past alongside thoughts of the future.

Refusing to be filmed during his lifetime, Nijinsky strongly believed his performances should only be experienced live. Likewise Bustin prefers her works to be encountered in real time under the honest inconsistency of natural light. Like the tip of antennae, one’s eyes should roam over surface, roll over folds, shift focus through diaphanous layers and peer into copper reflections. Her works call upon an understanding of Fühler and our capacity to feel as sentient beings. They ask us to look again.

Text by Poppy Bowers, Curator, Whitworth Gallery, Manchester

Exhibited works

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