David Gryn blog

Posts Tagged ‘SoundScape Park’

Film and Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2015

In ABMB, Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Garth Greenan, Howardina Pindell, Miami Beach, New World Symphony, SoundScape Park, Uncategorized on 25/11/2015 at 3:36 pm

 

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Howardina Pindell, Free, White and 21, 1980. Garth Greenan Gallery

Our Hidden Futures
Film at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2015
The Artists Surround Sound Project
Curated by David Gryn of Daata Editions and Artprojx
SoundScape Park, New World Center, Miami Beach
December 2-5, 2015 from 6pm

https://www.artbasel.com/miami-beach/

FREE

Dates and Schedule:

Wed, Dec 2
9am New World Symphony Insights Talk with David Gryn and artists Sofie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Jillian Mayer, Mariele Neudecker and moderated by Dennis Scholl.

6pm Surround sound work by artist Mariele Neudecker

Artist Film program
8pm Fairy Doll; 58 mins. Artists: Rineke Dijkstra, Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle, Carla Chaim, Anna K.E. & Florian Meisenberg, Anna Maria Maiolino, Howardena Pindell.

9pm Speak Easy; 78 mins. Artists: Simone Leigh & Liz Magic Laser with Alicia Hall Moran, Jumana Manna, JoAnn Verburg, Melanie Smith with Rafael Ortega, Marinella Senatore, Catherine Sullivan, Ann-Sofi Sidén in collaboration with Jonathan Bepler.

Thurs Dec 3
6pm Surround sound work by artist Sofie Alsbo

Artist Film program
9pm Afterward via Fantasia; 60 mins. Artists: Catherine Sullivan with George Lewis and Sean Griffin,

10pm Sea of Silence; 56 mins. Artists: Marnie Weber, Camille Henrot, Shirazeh Houshiary, Cauleen Smith, Minnette Vári, Tracey Emin, Nikki S. Lee.

Fri, Dec 4
6pm Surround sound work by artist Camille Norment

Artist Film program
8pm Duet; 45 mins. Artists: Janet Biggs, Zanele Muholi, Nicola Thomas, Talia Chetrit, Sue de Beer.

9pm Snow Job; 62 mins. Artists: Berna Reale, Shana Moulton, Mary Reid Kelley, Barbara Hammer, Diana Thater, Chloe Wise & Claire Christerson, Ida Applebroog, Breda Beban, Judith Hopf.

Sat, Dec 5
2pm Salon talk – The Artists Surround Sound Project
Moderator: David Gryn, artists: Sofie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker, Camille Norment

6pm Surround sound work by artist Alice Jacobs

Artist Film program
8pm Vanishing Point; 58 mins; Artist: Breda Beban, María Fernanda Cardoso, Janet Biggs, Fritzia Irizar, Suzanne Harris, Anna Barham, Guan Xiao, Susanne M. Winterling, Pia Camil, Cornelia Parker.

9pm Bikini Carwash; 52 mins; the seven works in this program will explore the great outdoors, capturing urban and rural encounters. Artists: Liz Cohen, Marnie Weber, Jaki Irvine, Micol Assaël, Kristin Oppenheim, Cauleen Smith, Milena Bonilla.

LINKS

Art Basel in Miami Beach in 2015 http://artbasel.com/miami-beach

David Gryn / Artprojx blog https://davidgryn.wordpress.com/

New World Symphony http://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/concerts/insights-artists-film-and-sound-with-david-gryn/

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Film and Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach at SoundScape Park

In ABMB, Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, Art Film, Art Video, artists, Artprojx, David Gryn, Film, Film and Video, Miami, Miami Beach, New World Center, New World Symphony, Uncategorized on 18/11/2015 at 12:37 pm
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Sue de Beer – The Blue Lenses

Our Hidden Futures

Film at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2015

and

The Artists Surround Sound Project

Curated by David Gryn of Daata Editions and Artprojx

SoundScape Park, New World Center, Miami Beach

December 2-5, 2015 from 6pm

FREE

Film 

Artists: Ida Applebroog, Micol Assaël, Anna Barham, Breda Beban, Sue de Beer, Janet Biggs, Pia Camil, María Fernanda Cardoso, Carla Chaim, Talia Chetrit, Liz Cohen, Rineke Dijkstra, Tracey Emin, Barbara Hammer, Suzanne Harris, Camille Henrot, Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle, Judith Hopf, Shirazeh Houshiary, Fritzia Irizar, Jaki Irvine, Anna K.E. & Florian Meisenberg, Nikki S. Lee, Simone Leigh & Liz Magic Laser with Alicia Hall Moran, Anna Maria Maiolino, Jumana Manna, Shana Moulton, Zanele Muholi, Kristin Oppenheim with Don Maclean, Cornelia Parker, Howardena Pindell, Berna Reale, Mary Reid Kelley, Marinella Senatore, Ann-Sofi Sidén and Jonathan Bepler, Cauleen Smith, Melanie Smith with Rafael Ortega, Catherine Sullivan with George Lewis and Sean Griffin, Diana Thater, Nicola Thomas, Minnette Vári, JoAnn Verburg, Marnie Weber, Susanne M. Winterling, Chloe Wise & Claire Christerson, Guan Xiao.

Sound

Artists: Sofie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker, Camille Norment.

Galleries 

303 Gallery, Galeria Raquel Arnaud, Arredondo \ Arozarena, Marianne Boesky Gallery, mor charpentier, Pilar Corrias, CRG Gallery, Corbett vs. Dempsey, Goodman Gallery, Marian Goodman Gallery, Garth Greenan Gallery, Gavlak Gallery, Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Sies + Höke, Jenkins Johnson Gallery, Kalfayan Galleries, Kerlin Gallery, Galerie König, KOW, Simon Lee Gallery, Pace/MacGill Gallery, Lehmann Maupin, kamel mennour, Galerie Nordenhake, OMR, One and J. Gallery, Peres Projects, Metro Pictures, kaufmann repetto, Casas Riegner, Galeria Nara Roesler, Salon 94, Sicardi Gallery, Jessica Silverman Gallery, Galerie Gregor Staiger, Stevenson, Simone Subal Gallery, Galerie Barbara Thumm, Cristin Tierney Gallery, Tilton Gallery, Hauser & Wirth, Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, ZERO…

The New World Center’s projection wall will be home to a selection of this year’s premiere program of films and videos titled “Our Hidden Futures.” Curated by Art Basel film curator David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions and London’s Artprojx, the lineup will highlight an international selection of emerging and established artists, encompassing a range of moving image works that illustrate the breadth of these various analogue and digital mediums.

Join us for these events in SoundScape Park. For detailed information about each event, please click here or click on the image for each program.

Wednesday, December 2

6pm | Sound work
Mariele Neudecker, Figure of 8 (Rainforest, Ecuador, sound recorded at height: 1.39m, 9.78m, 22.59m, 30.79m and 37.26m), 2015, Galerie Barbara Thumm

8pm and 9pm | Short Film programs 

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Rineke Dijkstra – Marianna (The Fairy Doll)

Fairy Doll; Running time approximately 58’; the 2015 Film program will open with a selection of short works in which artists focus on single portrait to reveal nuances of the human condition.

Rineke Dijkstra, Kenyatta A.C. HinkleCarla Chaim, Anna K.E. & Florian Meisenberg, Anna Maria Maiolino, Howardena Pindell.

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Marinella Senatore – Speak Easy

Speak Easy; Running time approximately 78’; Speak Easy will consider the artistic use of the creative, the audience, and the allure of the arena, the theater and the theatrical to explore the unsaid or unsayable.

Simone Leigh & Liz Magic Laser with Alicia Hall MoranJumana MannaJoAnn Verburg, Melanie Smith with Rafael Ortega, Marinella Senatore, Catherine Sullivan, Ann-Sofi Sidén in collaboration with Jonathan Bepler.

Thursday, December 3

6pm | Sound work

Sofie AlsboClose Encounter, 2015, courtesy of the artist

9pm and 10pm | Short Film programs

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Catherine Sullivan – Afterward via Fantasia

Afterward Via Fantasia; Catherine Sullivan with George Lewis and Sean Griffin, Afterword via Fantasia, 2015, 60ʹ, Metro Pictures

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Marnie Weber – Sea of Silence

Sea of Silence; Running time approximately 56’; works within Sea of Silence reflect on the poetic silence of the absent and, in so doing, create a louder and much more visceral language.

Marnie WeberCamille Henrot, Shirazeh HoushiaryCauleen SmithMinnette Vári, Tracey Emin, Nikki S. Lee.

Friday, December 4

6pm | Sound work

Camille NormentToll – Dissonant Image, (Re-mixed and mastered from 2011 version of Toll), 2015, courtesy of the artist

8pm and 9pm | Short Film programs

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Janet Biggs – Duet

Duet; Running time approximately 45’; Duet will present artworks that embody pairs, the split screen, duos and unions, which are found in the style of the film, the artistic process or within the narrative.

Janet BiggsZanele MuholiNicola ThomasTalia ChetritSue de Beer.

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Barbara Hammer – Snow Job

Snow Job; Running time approximately 62’; selected works in Snow Job use satire to communicate messages that engage and humor us.

Berna Reale, Shana Moulton, Mary Reid KelleyBarbara HammerDiana ThaterChloe Wise & Claire ChristersonIda ApplebroogBreda BebanJudith Hopf.

Saturday, December 5

6pm | Sound work

Alice JacobsThe Intent I Owe, 2015, courtesy of the artist

8pm and 9pm | Short Film programs

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Janet Biggs – Vanishing Point

Vanishing Point; Running time approximately 58’; Vanishing Point will feature a selection of artworks which employ kinetic and choreographed movement to investigate the factory, machines, and the futility of war, as well as the demise of manufacturing and its consequences.

Breda BebanMaría Fernanda Cardoso, Janet BiggsFritzia Irizar, Suzanne Harris, Anna Barham, Guan Xiao, Susanne M. Winterling, Pia Camil, Cornelia Parker.

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Bikini Carwash; Running time approximately 52’; the seven works in this program will explore the great outdoors, capturing urban and rural encounters.

Liz Cohen, Marnie WeberJaki Irvine, Micol Assaël, Kristin Oppenheim, Cauleen Smith, Milena Bonilla.

LINKS

For the full list of films featured at Art Basel in Miami Beach in 2015, please visit artbasel.com/miami-beach/film

ABMB 2015 Film Trailer https://youtu.be/aqgSICzFuuc

Artlyst http://www.artlyst.com/articles/art-basel-announces-2015-film-programme-for-miami-beach-fair

ARTnews http://www.artnews.com/2015/10/23/art-basel-miami-beach-2015-announces-film-program/

Artlyst on Talks program http://www.artlyst.com/articles/artists-and-art-professionals-lead-talks-programme-at-art-basel-miami-2015

New World Symphony Insights Talk http://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/concerts/insights-artists-film-and-sound-with-david-gryn/

Soundcloud tracks https://soundcloud.com/david-gryn/sets/the-artists-surround-sound

New World Symphony https://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/art-basel-at-soundscape-park/

The Artists Surround Sound Project – Art Basel in Miami Beach 2015

In Art Basel, Art Fair, artists, Miami, Miami Beach, New World Symphony, Sound on 03/11/2015 at 3:41 pm
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SoundScape Park during Film at Art Basel in Miami Beach curated by David Gryn (from the 2013 screening of Mickalene Thomas, Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman: A Portrait of My Mother). Image: courtesy Art Basel

The Artists Surround Sound Project

Film at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2015

Sofie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker, Camille Norment

Curated and organised by David Gryn of Daata Editions and Artprojx worldwide

SoundScape Park, New World Center, Miami Beach

December 2-5, 2015 at 6pm

FREE

Soundcloud trackshttps://soundcloud.com/david-gryn/sets/the-artists-surround-sound

New World Symphony https://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/art-basel-at-soundscape-park/

Facebook event https://www.facebook.com/events/140052276352255/

Talk at the New World Symphony – http://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/concerts/insights-artists-film-and-sound-with-david-gryn/

Wednesday, December 2: Mariele Neudecker

Thursday, December 3:  Sofie Alsbo

Friday, December 4: Camille Norment

Saturday, December 5: Alice Jacobs

Every evening at 6pm during Art Basel in Miami Beach, prior to the Film program, sound works by Sofie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker and Camille Norment will be presented at 6pm (until 8pm) on the state-of-the art surround sound system with its 160 speakers in SoundScape Park.

Nothing is going to sound quite like this …

Art Basel in Miami Beach – Talks Program

Salon talks panel (full talks program pdf)

Saturday, December 5, 2015, 2pm to 3pm

The Artists Surround Sound Project
Mariele Neudecker, Camille Norment, Sophie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs
Moderator: David Gryn, Curator of Art Basel’s Film sector and Founder of Daata Edition and Artprojx

sofiealsbo_closeEncounter

Sofie Alsbo, Close Encounter, 2015

Sofie Alsbo

Close Encounter (2015)

Close Encounter (2015) is a surround sound piece made specifically for Miami Soundscape Park as part of Surround Sound Artists Project.

Signals reaching for a wave. Roaming. Vibrations and heartbeats. Clap. A drone that bites its own tail. A circulating loop around the crowd. The body in a mass. Clap. Close Encounter enters the arena with sporadic fragments as the soundscape sway in the contrast of the physicality and transparency of the presence of sound.

Sofie Alsbo (b. 1982, Denmark) received a BA in Fine Art from Central St. Martins UAL and a Postgraduate Diploma from The Royal Academy Schools in London. Working with video, animation and sound a relationship between technology and the human body is explored as the work focuses on the pull between the internal and external space of the body and mind.

credits:

Pete Jones Music

Arge
Sound Designer
Envy Post Production

James
Producer
Envy Post Production

www.sofiealsbo.com

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Alice Jacobs, The Intent I Owe, 2015

Alice Jacobs

The Intent I Owe, 2015

Alter our fear, you frown me,

With her, with her, will feel form.

How dear and fairs, and soul, won’t be.

So kind, giving of being, inhabited here,

She laughed in dear o mourning.

For plans hath loved so grow,

For you, sigh and frown, whore again,

On hold, for hell or high, bitter end,

Alter our fear.

Alter our fear, who, bears flight,

When here, descend our endeavours,

So last, untold and shouts bear down.

Mere time near heart and first once stood,

Don’t lie, the bruise in the family,

In deed, were told fairs and cold.

Oh mother, her again, her screaming!

Oh you, frown hiding by our lost youth,

Alter our fear.

All men here, right, men now,

Dear here, it wont hurt to hold them,

One died, is how this all turned out.

Stay close, and hear the mothers womb,

Her voice still shakes, but I warned her,

The wounds, will hide across her face.

Dear you, only the holy shall save you,

Take care, this fear and thought of you,

Ave Maria!

The Intent I Owe, (2015) is based on Ave Maria by Schubert. Originally sung in German, here the lyrics have been transposed into an English poem. The harmonic sounds focus on religious notations of women, the iconic figure of Madonna and, by contrast, how in reality, men perceive the female as mother and sex object.

Alice Jacobs (b 1992, London) MA Royal Collage of Art (2017). BA (Hons) Central Saint Martins (2015). Uniwersytet Artystyczny w Poznaniu (2014). Jacobs addresses a feminist perspective to create a platform for the female gaze via performance, sound and sculptural media. She is interested in the visual representation of gender interaction as delineated by a patriarchal society.

Credits:

Theo Zeal, Sound Producer, UK

Milly Forrest, Voice, Royal Academy of Music, UK

Rodrigo Canas, Royal Collage of Art, UK

Louis Dowdeswell, Assistant Sound Engineer, UK

http://www.a-vaj.co.uk/

TiputiniTree1

Mariele Neudecker, Figure of 8 (Rainforest, Ecuador, sound recorded at height: 1.39m, 9.78m, 22.59m, 30.79m and 37.26m), for 5.1 surround, 16 minutes looped, 2015 (courtesy Galerie Barbara Thumm, Berlin, Germany) PHOTO: Laurie Lax

Mariele Neudecker

Figure of 8 (Rainforest, Ecuador, sound recorded at height: 1.39m, 9.78m, 22.59m, 30.79m and 37.26m), for 5.1 surround, 16 minutes looped, 2015 (courtesy Galerie Barbara Thumm, Berlin, Germany)

’Figure of 8’ aims to create a soundscape that is artificially collaged from 3-dimensional sound-recordings that, at the time of capture, observed and co-responded with the circadian rhythm of the place. The sound implies and animates a physical shift through a physical space and a horizontal timeline, a sound experience of ‘a night in the jungle’.  Going beyond the image, Neudecker, at times, works with classical music and ‘sound data’, exploring the pathos and evocative power of ‘audio’ that is rooted in ‘ground truth’, a term used in remote sensing to describe data collected on location. In this particular location: no image, moving or still, can possibly capture what the sound manages to convey. Tiputini Biodiversity Station [Ecuador] where these recordings were taken – for a permanent, commissioned work for the new Cancer Centre at Guy’s Hospital, London, which is due to open late 2016 – is one of the most bio-diverse forests in the world. Its sounds never stop.

Mariele Neudecker [b.1965 Germany] lives and works in Bristol, UK and uses a broad range of media including sculpture, film, photography as well as sound. Her works have been exhibited widely internationally both in group- and solo-exhibitions. Her practice investigates the formation and historical dissemination of cultural constructs around the natural world and notion of a Contemporary Sublime. Neudecker often uses technology’s virtual capabilities in order to reproduce a heightened experience of nature & landscape, thus addressing the subjective and mediated condition of any first hand encounter.

credits:

Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK

Guy’s & St Thomas’ Charity, London, UK

Futurecity, London, UK

Bath Spa University, Bath, UK

Laurie Lax and John Taylor, Bristol and Bath, UK

Jan Meinema, Creative Music Technology @ Bath Spa University, UK

Manus Pitt, BBC Natural History Unit, Bristol, UK

Tiputini Biodiversity Research Station, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador

www.marieleneudecker.co.uk

www.bthumm.de

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Camille Norment, Toll – Dissonant Image
 (Re-mixed and mastered from Toll, 2011 for 5.1 surround), 2015

Camille Norment

Toll – Dissonant Image
(Re-mixed and mastered from Toll, 2011 for 5.1 surround), 2015

Three instruments – the rare glass armonica, the Norwegian Hardanger fiddle, and the electric guitar – each, once banned for fear of the psychological, physical, or social effects they had on the body – come together in a visceral soundscape of resonance and overtone that levels beauty and noise. The title composition was influenced by Arvo Pärt’s “Fratres,” meaning ‘brotherhood,’ and puts the notion of social harmony and dissonance to question through lulling, taunting, and abrasive textures.The enveloping sonic image invokes the instruments’ relationships to notions of magic and the uncanny, hypnosis and trance, and noise as a psychological atmosphere. The powerful sonic worlds they create resonate through a tantalizing union of the instruments’ voices and their paradoxical cultural histories.

The work of artist Camille Norment guides an investigation of socio-cultural phenomena through particular instances and significations of sound and music. The aim is to produce critical artworks that are equally occupied with experiential form, and conceptual narrative.  There is a particular interest in both sonic and socio-cultural tension – parallels of dissonance – and an underlying interest in the physiological effects of sound on the body that may exceed the cultural boundaries of perception.

http://www.norment.net/

David Gryn

Curator Film and Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach

Director, Daata Editions and Artprojx

http://daata-editions.com

http://artprojx.com

http://artbasel.com

https://davidgryn.wordpress.com

Film at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2015 – Our Hidden Futures

In Art Basel, Art Fair, artists, Artprojx, Chloe Wise, Claire Christerson, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Film, Moving Image, Sound, Video Art on 24/10/2015 at 10:16 am
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Chloe Wise & Claire Christerson, Greece, 2015, 3′, courtesy of the artists

Our Hidden Futures

Film: Art Basel announces 2015 program for Miami Beach

Curated by David Gryn, Daata Editions and Artprojx

Film Trailer

– ART BASEL PRESS RELEASE MIAMI BEACH | OCTOBER 23 | 2015

From December 2 through 6, 2015, Art Basel will present a premier program of over 50 films and videos by and about artists selected under the title ‘Our Hidden Futures’. Screened on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, the program is again curated by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions and London’s Artprojx.

First-time Art Basel film curator Marian Masone, Senior Programming Advisor at the Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York has selected the feature-length film ‘Troublemakers – The Story of Land Art’ (2015) by filmmaker James Crump for a special screening at the Colony Theatre on Friday, December 4.

Gryn’s program of film and video works, drawn from the show’s participating galleries, will include work by Ida Applebroog, Anna Barham, Breda Beban, Janet Biggs, Sue de Beer, Rineke Dijkstra, Tracey Emin, Barbara Hammer, Shirazeh Houshiary, Jaki Irvine, Anna K.E. & Florian Meisenberg, Jumana Manna, Howardena Pindell, Cauleen Smith, Catherine Sullivan, and Marnie Weber.

Every evening, in addition to the Film program, sound works by Sofie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker and Camille Norment will be presented on the state-of-the arts surround sound system in SoundScape Park, curated by David Gryn. In conjunction with the outdoor film screenings, over 80 works have been selected to be shown within a designated Film Library at the Art Basel fair, whose Lead Partner is UBS.

Returning for his fifth year with Art Basel, curator David Gryn’s selection of works for Film will explore the history and future path of moving image artworks. Framed under the title ‘Our Hidden Futures’, the lineup will highlight an international selection of emerging and established artists, encompassing a range of moving image works that illustrate the breadth of these various analogue and digital mediums.

On Saturday, December 5 at 2pm, Art Basel’s Salon program will feature ‘The Artists
Surround Sound Project’ a talk between Art Basel film curator David Gryn and the artists
Sophie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker and Camille Norment. Art Basel
entry tickets include admission to the Salon.

For the full list of films featured at Art Basel in Miami Beach in 2015, please visit artbasel.com/miami-beach/film

– GENERAL INFORMATION

Daily (December 2 – 6)

Miami Beach Convention Center Film Library

In conjunction with the outdoor program, over 80 selected works will be presented on six touch-screen monitors within the Film Library at Art Basel’s show during show hours. Access with a show entrance ticket.

Nightly (December 2 – 5)

SoundScape Park Evening Film Program

Outdoor screenings will take place in SoundScape Park on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, a three-minute walk from the Miami Beach Convention Center. Admission to Film at SoundScape Park is free. Visitors are encouraged to bring blankets and lawn chairs.

Every evening from 6pm to the start of the first film screening, sound works by different artists, curated by David Gryn, will be presented in SoundScape Park: Weds, Dec 2: Mariele Neudecker / Thurs, Dec 3:  Sofie Alsbo / Fri, Dec 4: Camille Norment / Sat, Dec 5: Alice Jacobs. Free public access, seating is limited – bring a blanket or lawn chair.

– 2015 FILM PROGRAM

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

6pm | Sound work

Mariele Neudecker, Figure of 8 (Rainforest, Ecuador, sound recorded at height: 1.39m, 9.78m, 22.59m, 30.79m and 37.26m), 2015, Galerie Barbara Thumm

8pm | Short Film program | Fairy Doll

Running time approximately 58’; selected by David Gryn

The 2015 Film program will open with a selection of short works in which artists focus on a single portrait to draw out the nuances of what it means to be human.

Rineke Dijkstra, Marianna (The Fairy Doll), 2014, 19’13”, Marian Goodman Gallery

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle, The Countermand, 2014, 9’48”, Jenkins Johnson Gallery

Carla Chaim, Lua Certa, 2011, 1’03”, Galeria Raquel Arnaud

Anna K.E. & Florian Meisenberg, Late Checkout (Part II), 2015, 9’58”, Simone Subal Gallery

Anna Maria Maiolino, Um Momento, Por Favor, 1999/2004, 4’30”, Hauser & Wirth

Howardena Pindell, Free, White and 21, 1980, 12’15”, Garth Greenan Gallery

9pm | Short Film program | Speak Easy

Running time approximately 78’; selected by David Gryn

‘Speak Easy’ will consider the artistic use of the creative, the audience, and the allure of the arena, the theater and the theatrical to explore the unsaid or unsayable.

Simone Leigh & Liz Magic Laser with Alicia Hall Moran, Breakdown, 2011, 9’46”, Tilton Gallery

Jumana Manna, A Sketch of Manners (Alfred Roch’s Last Masquerade), 2013, 12′, CRG Gallery

JoAnn Verburg, Watching Trisha Brown, 2015, 2’40”, Pace/MacGill Gallery

Melanie Smith with Rafael Ortega, Aztec Stadium. Malleable Deed, 2010, 10’29”, Sicardi Gallery

Marinella Senatore, Speak Easy, 2009, 15′, Peres Projects

Catherine Sullivan, Triangle of Need (Olympian and Doves), 2007, 8’22”, Metro Pictures

Ann-Sofi Sidén in collaboration with Jonathan Bepler, Curtain Callers, 2011, 20′, Galerie Barbara Thumm

Thursday, December 3, 2015

6pm | Sound work

Sofie Alsbo, Close Encounter, 2015, , courtesy of the artist

9pm | Afterward Via Fantasia

Catherine Sullivan with George Lewis and Sean Griffin, Afterword via Fantasia, 2015, 60ʹ, Metro Pictures

Catherine Sullivan’s film, ‘Afterword Via Fantasia’, is conceived within the framework of an opera written by composer George Lewis and co-directed by Sullivan and longtime collaborator Sean Griffin. Sullivan transposes material from Lewis’s libretto into a series of scenes shot on sets for other plays with parallel and divergent social and cultural themes. The opera and film are based on Lewis’s widely-acclaimed book A Power Stronger Than Itself: The AACM (Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians) and American Experimental Music. The AACM has long played a key role in American experimental music, forging new models of black identity and social activism.

10pm | Short Film program | Sea of Silence

Running time approximately 56’; selected by David Gryn

Works within ‘Sea of Silence’ reflect on the poetic silence of the absent and, in so doing, create a louder and much more visceral language.

Marnie Weber, Sea of Silence, 2009, 14’15”, Gavlak Gallery / Simon Lee Gallery

Camille Henrot, Million Dollars Point, 2011, 5’35”, Galerie König / kamel mennour

Shirazeh Houshiary, Dust, 2011-2013, 7’08”, Lehmann Maupin

Cauleen Smith, Crow Requiem, 2015, 11′, Corbett vs. Dempsey

Minnette Vári, Quake, 2007, 6’23”, Goodman Gallery

Tracey Emin, Love Never Wanted Me, 2013, 2’48”, Lehmann Maupin

Nikki S. Lee, Yours, 2015, 8’41”, One and J. Gallery

Friday, December 4

6pm | Sound work

Camille Norment, Toll – Dissonant Image, (Re-mixed and mastered from 2011 version of Toll), 2015, courtesy of the artist

8pm | Short Film program | Duet

Running time approximately 45’; selected by David Gryn

‘Duet’ will present artworks that embody pairs, the split screen, duos and unions, which are found in the style of the film, the artistic process or within the narrative.

Janet Biggs, Duet, 2010, 6’47”, Cristin Tierney Gallery

Zanele Muholi, Ayanda & Nhlanhla Moremi’s Wedding, 2013, 11’50”, Stevenson

Nicola Thomas, S-time, 2015, 3’53”, courtesy of the artist

Talia Chetrit, Parents, 2014, 9’44, Sies + Höke, kaufmann repetto

Nicola Thomas, Julian in two parts, 2015 2’02”, courtesy of the artist

Sue de Beer, The Blue Lenses, 2014, 19’03”, Marianne Boesky Gallery

9pm | Short Film program | Snow Job

Running time approximately 62’; selected by David Gryn

Selected works in ‘Snow Job’ use satire to communicate messages that engage and humor us.

Berna Reale, Cantando na Chuva (Singing in the Rain), 2014, 4’15”, Galeria Nara Roesler

Shana Moulton, MindPlace ThoughtStream, 2014, 11’57”, Galerie Gregor Staiger

Mary Reid Kelley, Camel Toe, 2008, 1’25”, Pilar Corrias

Barbara Hammer, Snow Job: The Media Hysteria of Aids, 1986, 7’44”, KOW

Diana Thater, Male Gyr-Peregrine Falcon (Grim), 2012, 30”, Hauser & Wirth

Chloe Wise & Claire Christerson, Greece, 2015, 3′, courtesy of the artists

Ida Applebroog, It’s No Use Alberto, 1978, 9’36”, Hauser & Wirth

Breda Beban, Jason’s Dream, 1997, 10′, courtesy of the artist’s estate & Kalfayan Galleries

Mary Reid Kelley, Swinburne’s Pasiphae, 2014, 8’58’, Pilar Corrias

Judith Hopf, Lily´s Laptop, 2013, 5’29”, kaufmann repetto

8:30 pm | James Crump, Troublemakers – The Story of Land Art, 2015

Special Film Screening at Colony Theatre, 1040 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach

Running time 72ʹ; selected by Marian Masone

Troublemakers – The Story of Land Art, 2015 unearths the history of land art in the tumultuous late 1960s and early 1970s. Focused on a cadre of renegade New York artists that sought to transcend the limitations of painting and sculpture by producing earthworks on a monumental scale in the desolate desert spaces of the American southwest, the film includes rare footage and interviews with artists such as Robert Smithson (Spiral Jetty), Walter De Maria (The Lightning Field) and Michael Heizer (Double Negative). The screening is followed by a panel discussion between the movie’s Director James Crump and Art Basel Film co-curator Marian Masone.

Saturday, December 5, 2015

6pm | Sound work

Alice JacobsThe Intent I Owe, 2015, courtesy of the artist

8pm | Short Film program | Vanishing Point 

Running time approximately 58’; selected by David Gryn

‘Vanishing Point’ will feature a selection of artworks which employ kinetic and choreographed movement to investigate the factory, machines, and the futility of war, as well as the demise of manufacturing and its consequences.

Breda Beban, Let’s call it love, 2000, 7’30’’, artist’s estate, Kalfayan Galleries

María Fernanda Cardoso, On the Origins of Art: Maratus Volans, Male and Female, Artists, 2015, 3’13”, Casas Riegner

Janet Biggs, Vanishing Point, 2009, 10’32”, Cristin Tierney Gallery

Fritzia Irizar, Sin título (requiem JMAF), 2015, 4’19”, Arredondo \ Arozarena

Suzanne Harris, The Wheels / Flying Machine, 1973, 5’47”, Rhona Hoffman Gallery

Anna Barham, The squid that hid, 2015, 5’05”, Galerie Nordenhake

Guan Xiao, Hidden Track, 2015, 4’51”, Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler

Susanne M. Winterling, Immersion Vertex (Prototyp Diadem), 2’22”, 2014, Jessica Silverman Gallery

Pia Camil, No A Trio A, 2013, 7’31”, OMR

Cornelia Parker, War Machine, 2015, 9’25”, courtesy of the artist and Frith Street Gallery

9pm | Bikini Carwash

Running time approximately 52’; selected by David Gryn

The seven works in this program will explore the great outdoors, capturing urban and rural encounters.

Liz Cohen, Bikini Carwash, 2002, 5’58”, Salon 94

Marnie Weber, Songs Hurt Me, 1994, 2′, Gavlak Gallery / Simon Lee Gallery

Jaki Irvine, Se Compra: Sin é, 2014, 17’37”, Kerlin Gallery

Micol Assaël, Overstrain, 2012, 3′, ZERO…

Kristin Oppenheim, Ultramarine, 2015, 7’43”, in collaboration with Don Maclean, 303 Gallery

Cauleen Smith, H-E-L-L-O, 2014, 11′, Corbett vs. Dempsey

Milena Bonilla, Ceremony for a Homogeneous Landscape, 2009, 2’34”, mor charpentier

RELATED LINKS

New World Symphony https://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/art-basel-at-soundscape-park/

Artlyst http://www.artlyst.com/articles/art-basel-announces-2015-film-programme-for-miami-beach-fair

ARTnews http://www.artnews.com/2015/10/23/art-basel-miami-beach-2015-announces-film-program/

Artlyst on Talks program http://www.artlyst.com/articles/artists-and-art-professionals-lead-talks-programme-at-art-basel-miami-2015

Buro on Nikki S. Lee http://www.buro247.sg/culture/news/art-basel-2015-program-for-miami-beach.html

– NOTES TO EDITORS

About the Curators

David Gryn

David Gryn is the founder and director of Daata Editions, a new online platform commissioning artists video, sound and web editioned artworks and director of London’s Artprojx, screening, curating, promoting and lecturing on artists’ moving image and other art projects, working with leading contemporary artists, art galleries, museums, art fairs, art schools and film festivals worldwide.

Marian Masone

Marian Masone is a film curator, lecturer and writer based in New York. For over 20 years Masone has worked at The Film Society of Lincoln Center, America’s pre-eminent film organization. She sits on the selection committees for two of The Film Society’s most prestigious festivals: ‘The New York Film Festival’ and ‘New Directors/New Films’, a co-production with the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Masone has been a guest lecturer and curator for leading institutions such as Parsons School of Design in New York and Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid. Her writings on film and media have appeared in many leading newspapers and magazines.

About Art Basel

Art Basel stages the world’s premier art shows for Modern and contemporary works, sited in Basel, Miami Beach and Hong Kong. Defined by its host city and region, each show is unique, which is reflected in its participating galleries, artworks presented, and the content of parallel programming produced in collaboration with local institutions for each edition. In addition to ambitious stands featuring leading galleries from around the world, each show’s exhibition sectors spotlight the latest developments in the visual arts, offering visitors new ideas, new inspiration and new contacts in the art world.

Partners

UBS, global Lead Partner of Art Basel, has supported the organization for more than 20 years. As Art Basel’s global network has expanded, so too has UBS’s commitment and lead partnership, which includes all three shows in Basel, Miami Beach and Hong Kong. In addition to its support of Art Basel, UBS has a long and substantial record of engagement in contemporary art: as a holder of one of the world’s most distinguished corporate art collections, as an active partner in global contemporary art projects such as the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, and as a source of information and insights through the UBS Art Competence Center, UBS Arts Forum and its new contemporary art news-focused app, ‘Planet Art’.

Associate Partners Davidoff, the prestigious Swiss cigar brand, Audemars Piguet, the independent high-end watch manufacturer, and NetJets, the world leader in private aviation, support Art Basel across its three shows. Art Basel’s Media Partners are The Financial Times and the Miami Herald, and the VIP car service at the show is by BMW. Long-standing partner AXA ART, the international art insurance specialist, provides VIP guided tours at all shows. For further information on Art Basel’s partners, please visit artbasel.com/partners.

Important Dates for Media

Private View
Wednesday, December 2, 2015, 11am to 8pm (by invitation only)

Vernissage
Thursday, December 3, 2015, 11am to 3pm (by invitation only)

Public Days
Thursday, December 3, 2015, 3pm to 8pm
Friday, December 4, 2015, 12noon to 8pm
Saturday, December 5, 2015, 12noon to 8pm
Sunday, December 6, 2015, 12noon to 6pm

Upcoming Art Basel shows
Hong Kong, March 24 – 26, 2016
Basel, June 16 – 19, 2016

Press accreditation
Online registration for press accreditation is now open and will close on November 13, 2015. Please visit artbasel.com/accreditation.

Media information online

Media information and images can be downloaded directly from artbasel.com/press.

For the latest updates on Art Basel, visit artbasel.com, find us on Facebook at facebook.com/artbasel
or follow @artbasel on Instagram, Google+, Twitter, Weibo and Wechat.

Press Contacts

Art Basel, Dorothee Dines

Tel. +41 58 206 27 06, press@artbasel.com

PR Representatives for North and South America and the Middle East

Fitz & Co., Katrina Weber Ashour

Tel. +1 212 627 1653, katrina@fitzandco.com

PR Representatives for Florida

Garber & Goodman, Robert Goodman

Tel. +1 305 674 12 92, FLrepresentative@artbasel.com

PR Representatives for Europe

Sutton, Sarah Norton

Tel. +44 20 7183 3577, sarah@suttonpr.com

PR Representatives for Asia

Sutton, Erica Siu

Tel. +852 2528 0792, erica@suttonprasia.com

Playing with Reel Life – David Gryn interview on ArtInfo

In ABMB, Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, Art Fair, Art Video, Artprojx Cinema, Miami, Miami Beach, New World Center on 28/11/2014 at 11:32 pm
Takeshi_Murata_OM_Rider_Salon_94

Takeshi Murata and Robert Beatty, OM Rider, 2013, 11’39”, Salon 94, Ratio 3

The creative harvest at Art Basel Miami Beach (ABMB) is so colossal that picking one stand-out event is an exercise in impossibility. However, despite the enormity of the art showcase, certain sectors of the ABMB — from nine that it has been sectioned into — always reap more audience mindshare than most others. The film sector is one of those hallowed events.

The film program of the ABMB 2014 is expectedly humungous in scale with over 80 films and videos to be screened. The films and video works have been selected by David Gryn, director of London’s Artprojx, who has culled out work from ABMB’s participating galleries. The showcase also includes a tribute to Harun Farocki, the Indian-origin German filmmaker who passed away recently.

Gryn speaks to Blouin Artinfo about the films being screened at ABMB 2014.

BA. Why did you choose ‘Playfulness’ as the theme of the film section for ABMB 2014?

DG: This year, my selection for the 4th edition of Film section has been driven by the notion of ‘Playfulness’: the playfulness of Internet gaming, online action, art making, dance and performing, color, sound and music. Most art making is playful by its very nature, however I have always designed the film program to consider audience engagement; the films selected reflect an exciting range of artist works that stimulate, enliven and rivet the audience, with captivating color, sound and process. This is not about showing art that is just easy to digest, but about showing art that is inherently engaging and encourages audiences to stay for an hour or three.

BA. Could you explain the selection process in detail?

DG: We have approximately 200 artist submissions from about 150 galleries at the fair. I work closely with many galleries to encourage their submissions of their artists. Galleries are usually the experts in their artists’ outputs. I see my role as a facilitator and enabler. Some galleries submit many entries and others, very few. My challenges are the galleries who do not submit at all, although some just do not represent any artists who use moving image. But my pleasure is the galleries who send me plenty.

Usually galleries who have seen the vast scale, brilliant sound and huge and receptive crowds are very happy to reapply each year. There are some galleries that I request artists from and some emerging artists that I introduce into the program.

BA. What are the most popular subjects that artists today are making films on?

DG: The internet and the multifarious worlds it intersects is an obvious subject. Art making remains at best when it is about making art but speaks to us about the essence of the human condition, without using a sledgehammer to make its point. True artists are constantly striving for a newness in their work and with the ever growing demands of making commodities, seek to turn to areas of art practice which have a difficult relationship with finance and demand an audience that actually looks, interrogates and digests their artworks.

BA. Is there a fundamental difference in the way artists approach the art of filmmaking today than it was about two decades back?

DG: The big change is the evolution over the last 20 years of digital technology. But the great artists remain few. There is a language of the internet that didn’t exist, but it is inherently about communication and it obsessively feeds our innate appetite for information and that is all about our need to co-exist with each other. Artists are now growing up with the online world as their natural language.

BA. Somehow, films by artists largely remain in the realm of documentary. Why is it so?

DG: Film and video by artists are another distinct artist medium like painting and sculpture. Filmmakers have often other concerns, however filmmakers like John Waters, Sophia Coppola, Ingmar Bergman are great artists whose art is film.

BA. At ABMB 2014, you are also going to give the talk — ‘Playfulness: Artists as Online Gamers, Surfers, and Armchair Digital Revolutionaries’. Could you explain?

DG: The title of the talk was central to my initial thinking for this year’s film programming, with a goal to have Tabor Robak speak, as he was one of my starting points. He curated the program that includes his work and that of Oliver Laric and Jon Rafman, they are leading lights amongst artists working in the digital art making sphere. I included Harun Farocki — whom I would have added anyway, but he sadly died in the process, so his inclusion is now a tribute to such a great artist, whom I spent much time with recently at the Loop Video Art Fair in Barcelona. Rachel Rose is the other artist on the panel, and her work had been introduced to me by Chrissie Iles, the brilliant curator of ‘Film and Beyond’ at the Whitney, and I am delighted she had agreed to be the moderator.

BA. Do films by artists find patrons with deep pockets just as visual arts do or is there still a financial divide between the two? 

DG: The positive financial world of artists’ films is still an evolving process. My role in doing this work with Art Basel evolved from the belief by the art fair that we still need to encourage galleries to show artists’ moving image, even if the market is very limited. It is an ever growing practice by artists — which has yet to fully find its commercial feet. This is indeed work in progress.

BA. What films would you suggest to a lay admirer of art who wants to educate himself on the subject? What is your personal all-time favourite film in the genre?

large

RACHEL ROSE, Palisades in Palisades, 2014

DG: There is a shot in a recent Rachel Rose film ‘Palisades in Palisades’, where the camera pans in on the flesh and v-neck part of a sweater, and you see the goosebumps next to the weave and texture of the sweater, and it is just a brilliant moment of human encounter in an artists’ work. That is currently my favourite moment by an artist film.

My advice is to regard us art organisers, curators, galleries as generally a good level of quality assurance, decision making conduits and filters to often really great work. To name any one artist would be disingenuous to others. However, to give you an answer, if Philip Guston was alive and could make films like his paintings then I would be truly happy with that, perhaps with the additional choreography of dancer Michael Clark and the melancholic balletic piano sounds of Chopin.

https://davidgryn.wordpress.com/2014/11/26/film-art-basel-in-miami-beach-2014-overview/

www.artbasel.com/en/Miami-Beach

Sound by artists at Film: Art Basel in Miami Beach

In Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, Artprojx, David Gryn, Jennie C. Jones, Larry Achiampong, Raed Yassin, Stephen Vitiello on 16/11/2014 at 4:49 pm

 photo 3

Sound by artists

Larry Achiampong, Jennie C. Jones, Stephen Vitiello, Raed Yassin

at

Film: Art Basel in Miami Beach 2014. Curated by David Gryn.

From December 3 through 6, 2014, Art Basel’s Film sector will include over 80 films and videos. Outdoor Screenings are in SoundScape Park on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the Frank Gehry designed New World Center.

Every evening, sound works by different artists are presented from 6pm to the start of the first film screening in SoundScape Park: Wednesday (Stephen Vitiello, Scraped and Bowed, 2013-2014), Thursday (Larry Achiampong, The Mogya Project, 2014), Friday (Jennie C. Jones, From the Low to Higher Resonance, 2011-2014, Sikkema Jenkins), Saturday (Raed Yassin, The Deaf Oud, 2010, Kalfayan). The sound works are selected by David Gryn, Director of Artprojx worldwide, utilising the park’s fantastic surround sound system of over 160 speakers.

 photo 4

Stephen Vitiello,

Scraped and Bowed, 2013-2014,

Duration: 9:47

Performed by Stephen Vitiello and John Priestley at University of Richmond

A gently played recording, featuring instruments treated in a way beyond their normal tradition or culture. The primary sounds are of bowed gangsa from a university’s gamelan. Additional bowls and gongs are bowed, tapped and bounced off of a drum head. The ringing and beating of overtones creates an ethereal experience – perhaps like that of objects hovering in and out of focus.

In Scraped and Bowed 2013-2014, an ethereal and hovering multi-channel piece by Stephen i (performed by Vitiello and John Priestley), instruments are treated in a way beyond their normal tradition or culture. The instruments used in the performance where built by Gongsmith, Pandé Madé Sukerta of Blahbatu Village, Bali. Special thanks go to Andy McGraw at University of Richmond and American Contemporary.

from the split 7” record Sense Objects, published by Textual Records (http://www.textualrecords.com/Main/News)

a3262615638_10

Larry Achiampong

The Mogya Project (2014)

Larry Achiampong’s practice uses live performance, imagery and sound to explore representations of identity in the post digital age and the dichotomies found within a world dominated by cut-copy-paste facebook/tumblr/youtube-based cultures.

The Mogya Project represents years of research and art production in which Larry explores his audible heritage via his Ghanaian roots that resulted in the following audio projects; ‘Meh Mogya’ (2011) and ‘More Mogya’ (2012/13). For the first time these projects will be presented, one after the other in 5.1 surround sound.

https://soundcloud.com/blackph03nix

photo 1-1

Jennie C. Jones

From the Low to Higher Resonance

Audio Works:

From the Low is an audio re-composition in two movements investigating low frequency and the psychological / emotional effect of the ‘low end’. Metaphorically, addressing darkness and the notion of the ominous. Samples and ‘micro’ samples used are co-opted range from orchestral cinematic moments, to digital bass beats as well as tempo altered bass solos, from jazz legends of the sub-tonal: Charles Mingus and Ray Brown.

My intention is to carry forward the inherent emotion of the ‘Low’, the ideal of some discomfort and to include its varied forms outside of DJ culture, toward a more expansive dialogue and listening experience.

Re-mastered for Art Basel, originally at the Kitchen, NYC 2011.

From The Low (1st Movement) 1 min 44 seconds

From The Low (2nd  Movement) 1 min 47 seconds

Muhal: Slow Flute & Bells 2 min 16 seconds

http://www.jenniecjones.com/

photo 4

Raed Yassin

“The Deaf Oud”, 2010

Duration: 9 minutes

“The Deaf Oud’ is based on rare 7-inch records found by the artist, Raed Yassin, in Cairo, Egypt. The sound material of the found records has been mixed, deconstructed, reconstructed and manipulated through different effects and electronic means, to create a new Arabic minimalist piece.

https://soundcloud.com/raedyassin/the-deaf-oud

http://raedyassin.com/music.13

Other Links

https://davidgryn.wordpress.com/2014/11/11/film-art-basel-announces-2014-program-for-miami-beach/

https://www.artbasel.com/en/Miami-Beach/About-the-Show/Sectors/Film

TRAILER

http://facebook.com/artbasel

http://artbasel.com/miamibeach

https://davidgryn.wordpress.com

http://www.artprojx.com

Film program at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2014 curated by David Gryn

In ABMB, Art, Art Basel Miami Beach, ArtBasel, Artprojx, David Gryn, Film, Miami, Moving Image, New World Center, Video on 11/11/2014 at 4:52 pm
CiprianMureanUnchienandalou

Ciprian Mureşan, Un chien andalou, 2004, 51”, David Nolan Gallery

ART BASEL PRESS RELEASE
MIAMI BEACH | NOVEMBER 11 | 2014

Film: Art Basel announces 2014 program for Miami Beach

From December 3 through 7, 2014, Art Basel’s Film sector will include over 80 films and videos selected by David Gryn, director of London’s Artprojx. Gryn’s program of film and video works, drawn from the show’s participating galleries, includes work by Charles Atlas, Martin Creed, Susan Hiller, Parker Ito, Mark Leckey, Babette Mangolte, Takeshi Murata, Laure Prouvost, Alex Prager, Mark Wallinger, and a tribute to Harun Farocki, who passed away this July. In conjunction with the popular outdoor screenings in SoundScape Park on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, an extended film program will be presented within Art Basel’s newly designed film viewing room inside the Miami Beach Convention Center.

Curated around the notion of Playfulness, David Gryn’s fourth selection for Film will feature a wide array of film and video works: from Susan Hiller’s scientific Resounding (Infrared) (2014) to Atsushi Kaga’s dark and quirky 2007 series of hand-drawn animations and Hans Op de Beeck’s sublime Parade (2012). A highlight of the program will pair Charles Atlas’s 1986 film Ex Romance, and a new Miami Beach-specific edit of Parker Ito’s Wipeout XL. Artist Tabor Robak and David Gryn will co-curate a series of films addressing the unearthly reverberations of the Internet, gaming, and digital magical- realism, featuring work by younger artists Jon Rafman and Oliver Laric, alongside a tribute to the late Harun Farocki. The program will also look at dance in film with works by Dara Friedman, Rashaad Newsome and the seminal filmmaker Babette Mangolte.  FILM TRAILER

Every evening from 6pm to the start of the first film screening, surround sound works by Larry Achiampong, Jennie C. Jones, Stephen Vitiello and Raed Yassin will be presented on the state-of-the arts surround sound system in SoundScape Park.

Art Basel Film Library, has a dedicated film viewing room within the Miami Beach Convention Center’s exhibition halls. An extended selection of over 120 selected works, also curated by Gryn, will be presented for individual, viewer-directed private screening. Access is free with an entry ticket to the show. Daily Dec 3- Dec7.

On Friday, December 5, at 2pm, Art Basel’s Salon program will feature
Playfulness: artists as online gamers, surfers and armchair digital revolutionaries, a talk between David Gryn and the artists Tabor Robak and Rachel Rose, moderated by the curator Chrissie Iles. Art Basel entry tickets include admission to Salon.

For the full gallery list and extended film program, please visit: artbasel.com/miamibeach/film.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Nightly (December 3 – 6)

SoundScape Park Evening Film Program
Outdoor screenings will take place in SoundScape Park on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, a three-minute walk from the Miami Beach Convention Center. Admission to Film at SoundScape Park is free. Visitors are encouraged to bring blankets and lawn chairs.

Every evening from 6pm to the start of the first film screening, sound works by different artists will be presented in SoundScape Park: Wednesday: Stephen Vitiello, Scraped and Bowed, 2013-2014, Courtesy of the artist. Thursday: Larry Achiampong, The Mogya Project, 2014, Courtesy of the artist. Friday: Jennie C. Jones, From the Low to Higher Resonance, 2011-2014, Sikkema Jenkins & Co. Saturday: Raed Yassin, The Deaf Oud, 2010, Kalfayan Galleries.

Free public access, seating is limited – bring a blanket or lawn chair.

 FILM TRAILER

DETAILED FILM PROGRAM CURATED BY DAVID GRYN

Wednesday, December 3, 8pm

Playfulness
Running time 65′
In this program the intelligence, wit, and humor of artists such as Turner Prize winners Mark Leckey, Elizabeth Price, Martin Creed, and Laure Prouvost will be punctuated, among others, by the brief digitally animated paintings of Hayal Pozanti and the slapstick human sculptural intervention of Wood & Harrison.

Hayal Pozanti, A Lifetime of Likes, 2014, 25″, Jessica Silverman Gallery
Wood & Harrison, Board, 1993, 3’02”, Carroll / Fletcher
Alex Rodríguez, Nocturno 2, 2013, 3’59”, Casas Riegner
Hayal Pozanti, IP Overlords, 2014, 12″, Jessica Silverman Gallery
Mark Leckey, Pearl Vision, 2012, 3’10”, Gavin Brown’s enterprise, Cabinet, Galerie Buchholz
Wood & Harrison, Headstand, 1995, 1’02”, Carroll / Fletcher
Brian Bress, The Portrait Room, 2006, 4’10”, Cherry and Martin
Hayal Pozanti, Mobile Blinders, 2014, 15″, Jessica Silverman Gallery
Elizabeth Price, The Tent, 2012, 12′, MOT International
Rachel Rose, A Minute Ago, 2014, 8’43”, Courtesy of the artist
Hayal Pozanti, Virtual Diaspora, 2014, 22″, Jessica Silverman Gallery
Camille Henrot, Coupé/Décalé, 2010, 5’20”, Metro Pictures, kamel mennour
Wood & Harrison, Device, 1996, 2’45”, Carroll / Fletcher
Tomislav Gotovac, Feeling 7, 2000, 4’06”, Alexander Gray Associates, galerie frank elbaz
Hayal Pozanti, Empathy Box, 2014, 22″, 2014, 25″, Jessica Silverman Gallery
Taro Izumi, Steak House, 2009, 3’51”, Galerie Georges-Philippe & Nathalie Vallois
Laure Prouvost, For A Better Life, 2006, 1’52”, MOT International
Wood & Harrison, Three-Legged, 1997, 3’39”, Carroll / Fletcher
Martin Creed, Work No. 670 Orson and Sparky, 2007, 4’16”, Hauser & Wirth

Wednesday, December 3, 9pm

Armchair Surfers
Running time 60′
The artists in this program place a mirror in front of us – the Armchair Surfers of the 21st century – to explore the impact of an all-encompassing digitized world on humanity. In these works humor, titillation, coolness, memories, self-absorption and otherwise quirky reflections merge with our daily consumption of social media.

CAR (Conceptual Artists Research/Michelle Grabner), Pool, 1996, 3’10”, James Cohan Gallery
Saya Woolfalk, ChimaTek: Hybridization Machine, 2013, 3’40”, Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects
Chris Doyle (with music by Joe Arcidiacono), Waste_Generation, 2010-2011, 6’29”, Andrew Edlin Gallery
CAR (Conceptual Artists Research/Michelle Grabner), Egg Toss, 1996, 1’52”, James Cohan Gallery
Charles Richardson, Rehearsal (Miami edit), 2014, 4’, Courtesy of the artist
Nate Boyce, Scroll Sequence, 2014, 5’33”, Altman Siegel
Dashiell Manley, Untitled, 2011, 7’49”, Jessica Silverman Gallery
Florian Meisenberg, You are certainly entitled to this opinion, 2014, 7’40”, Wentrup
Leo Gabin, Oh Baby, 2013, 2’49”, Elizabeth Dee, Peres Projects
CAR (Conceptual Artists Research/Michelle Grabner) and David Robbins, Appleton East High School Band, 1999, 1’33”, James Cohan Gallery
Clunie Reid, Wet Dave (boom boom), 2009, 5’34”, MOT International
Saya Woolfalk, Chimera, 2013, 2’49”, Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects
Jayson Musson, Art Thoughtz with Hennessy Youngman: Beuys-Z, 2011, 5’11”,Salon 94

Wednesday, December 3, 10pm

Ex-Romance
Running time 64′
Charles Atlas has been a pioneering figure in film and video for over four decades, working with some of the most seminal, groundbreaking choreographers of our time, such as Michael Clark and the late Merce Cunningham. In this program, Atlas’s film Ex- Romance (1986) will be paired with a special 2014 Miami-edit of Wipeout XL by Parker Ito, heightening the common ground between the artists’ incongruous interests – from Tarot to foot-fetishes.

Charles Atlas, Ex Romance, 1986, 48’23”, Luhring Augustine
Parker Ito, Wipeout XL (Miami Beach), 2014 15’44”, Courtesy of the artist

Thursday, December 4, 10pm

The Digital Revolutionaries
Running time 67′
Co-curated by the artist Tabor Robak and David Gryn, this program will address the unearthly reverberations of the Internet, gaming, and digital magical-realism. The evening will conclude with a tribute to the seminal filmmaker Harun Farocki, whose work Parallel II (2012) examines the uncanny visual world-making of digital gaming.

Tabor Robak (with music by Fatima Al Qadiri), Vatican Vibes, 2011, 5’16”, team (gallery, inc.)
Jon Rafman, Popova-Lissitzky Office Complex, 2013, 2’10”, Courtesy of the artist and Zach Feuer Gallery
Jon Rafman, Juan Gris Dream House, 2013, 2′, Courtesy of the artist and Zach Feuer Gallery
Tabor Robak, 20XX, 2013, 6’43”, team (gallery, inc.)
Tabor Robak (with music by Gatekeeper), EXO (long version), 2012, 35’45”, team (gallery, inc.)
Oliver Laric, Versions 2012, 2012, 6’17”, Tanya Leighton
Harun Farocki, Parallel II, 2012, 9’, Greene Naftali Gallery, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac

Friday, December 5, 8pm

Radio Ga Ga
Running time 62′
Radio broadcasting – the audible transmission of information through radio waves – is a powerful medium that has long influenced human events. Concepts of radio and waves will be explored in this program, bookended by works that draw from broadcasts that go unnoticed, such as Bill Balaskas’ cobbled together news bulletins and Susan Hiller’s translations of radio frequencies emitted by the Big Bang.

Bill Balaskas, Info, 2011, 4’30”, Kalfayan Galleries
Frank Heath, Invasive Species, 2012, 11’30”, Simone Subal Gallery
Wagner Malta Tavares, Ondas Curtas, 2013, 8’52”, Galeria Marilia Razuk
Vartan Avakian, ShortWave / LongWave, 2009, 7’13”, Kalfayan Galleries
Susan Hiller, Resounding (Infrared), 2014, 30′, Timothy Taylor Gallery

Friday, December 5, 9pm

The Night of Forevermore

Running time 65′
The Night of Forevermore focuses on artists who employ cinematic and theatrical tropes: Ciprian Mureşan reconsiders Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí’s Surrealist classic Un Chien Andalou (1929) through the blockbuster animation Shrek (2001), while Jose Dávila applies his signature cutout method to Sergio Leone’s classic Spaghetti Western The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966).

Ciprian Mureşan, Un chien andalou, 2004, 51”, David Nolan Gallery
Tomislav Gotovac, Feeling 4, 2000, 3′, Alexander Gray Associates, galerie frank elbaz
Olaf Breuning, The Apple, 2006, 11’05”, Metro Pictures
Jose Dávila, The Stranger, the Stranger, and the Stranger, 2014, 2’56”, Galería OMR
Laure Prouvost, OWT, 2007, 3’20”, MOT International
Maya Watanabe, A-PHAN-OUSIA, 2008, 4’45”, 80m2 Livia Benavides
Tim Davis, La La Traviata, 2013, 12’05”, Van Doren Waxter
Marnie Weber, The Night of Forevermore, 2012, 14’45”, Simon Lee Gallery
Hans Op de Beeck, Parade, 2012, 11’25”, Galleria Continua
Alex Prager, Sunday, 2010, 1’08”, Lehmann Maupin

Saturday, December 6, 8pm

Rites of Spring
Running time 62′
From historical positions, such as Babette Mangolte’s 1978 collaboration with dancer Trisha Brown, to recent works such as Rashaad Newsome’s 2014 KNOT, this program will explore the radical implications of dance. Both Miami-based artist Dara Friedman and the Canadian-born Marcel Dzama were inspired by historical dance pieces: Igor Stravinsky’s ballet Rites of Spring and Oskar Schlemmer’s Triadic Ballet. Five short animations by the young Greek artist Rania Bellou will punctuate the screenings.

Rania Bellou, Punctuated Hi/stories, 2014, 2’58”, Kalfayan Galleries
Dara Friedman, Rite, 2014, 4’10”, Gavin Brown’s enterprise
Pilar Albarracín, Musical Dancing Spanish Doll, 2013, 3’25”, Galerie Georges-Philippe & Nathalie Vallois
Rania Bellou, Exercising Catching an Apple, 2008, 12”, Kalfayan Galleries
Marcel Dzama, A Game of Chess, 2011, 14’02”, Sies + Höke, David Zwirner
Ana Roldán, Construction concerned with the relationship between dissimilar emotional values in a composition with black and white, 2008, 2’12”, Instituto de visión
Rania Bellou, Tight Rope / Prison Privacy, 2008, 39”, Kalfayan Galleries
Brian Bress, Rock Your Body, 2005, 4’45”, Cherry and Martin
Rashaad Newsome, KNOT, 2014, 4′, Marlborough Gallery
Rania Bellou, Flying Go Around, 2011, 21”, Kalfayan Galleries
Dara Friedman, Ishmael and the Well of Ancient Mysteries, 2014, 12’, Gavin Brown’s enterprise
Babette Mangolte, Trisha Brown WATER MOTOR, 1978, 7’55”, Broadway 1602, Sikkema Jenkins & Co.
Rania Bellou, Trampoline / The Objectivity of Unprejudiced Witness, 2011, 22”, Kalfayan Galleries
Liu Chuang, Untitled (Dancing Partners), 5’14”, 2010, Salon 94

Saturday, December 6, 9pm

The Magic of Things
Running time 70′
This program is inspired by and will feature Mark Wallinger’s The Magic of Things (2010), a video of edited scenes from the popular 1970s TV sitcom Bewitched, in which everyday objects such as knives or glasses are magically moved by the good witch Samantha. Films with a similarly playful approach will be presented, interspersed with hand-drawn animations from the Japanese artist Atsushi Kaga.

Atsushi Kaga, Hole 1, 2007, 42”, mother’s tankstation
David Shrigley, Ones, 2009, 2’24”, Stephen Friedman Gallery
Brian Alfred, Under Thunder and Fluorescent Lights, 2014, 3′, Ameringer/McEnery/Yohe
Atsushi Kaga, Hole 2, 2007, 28”, mother’s tankstation
Hiraki Sawa, Hako, 2006, 4′, James Cohan Gallery
Takeshi Murata, OM Rider, 2013, 11’39”, Salon 94, Ratio 3
Atsushi Kaga, Hole 3, 2007, 28”, mother’s tankstation
Robin Rhode, Paper Planes, 2009, 2’40”, Lehmann Maupin
Theo Michael, The Splendour of the Heavens, 2008, 10′, Galería OMR
David Shrigley, The Artist, 2012, 2’24”, Stephen Friedman Gallery
Hiraki Sawa, Migration, 2003, 6′, James Cohan Gallery
Mark Wallinger, The Magic of Things, 2010, 10’32”, Galerie Krinzinger
Atsushi Kaga, Hole 4, 2007, 31”, mother’s tankstation
Cécile B. Evans, The Brightness, 2014, 4’48’’, Courtesy of the artist
Brent Green, To Many Men Strange Fates Are Given, 2011-2012, 10’15”, Andrew Edlin Gallery
Atsushi Kaga, Hole 5, 2007, 41”, mother’s tankstation

 FILM TRAILER

David Gryn

David Gryn is the founder and director of London’s Artprojx, screening, curating, promoting and lecturing on artists’ moving image and other art projects, working with leading contemporary artists, art galleries, museums, art fairs, art schools and charities worldwide.

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In Art, Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, Artsy, David Gryn, Film, Gryn, SoundScape Park on 20/07/2014 at 10:14 am

 

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Fantasia for Dissonant Harmonies. Film at Art Basel Miami Beach. Tonight at 10pm

In Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, David Gryn, Friedrich Kunath, Miami, Nicola Thomas, Salon 94, Takeshi Murata on 07/12/2013 at 1:28 pm
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Nicola Thomas, Dancing with Monk, 2013

FANTASIA FOR DISSONANT HARMONIES

FILM

TONIGHT – SATURDAY 7 DECEMBER 10pm

ART BASEL IN MIAMI BEACH 2013

SELECTED AND CURATED BY DAVID GRYN / ARTPROJX

AT THE

NEW WORLD CENTER

Saturday, December 7, 10pm
Fantasia for Dissonant Harmonies
In all the films in this program, the soundtrack plays a crucial role. The relationship that is developed between the visual and the audio builds a bridge to the location of the screening: the New World Center, Home of the New World Symphony, America’s Orchestral Academy.
Mahony, Los Tres Invitados, 2011, 3’03”, Galerie Emanuel Layr
Ana Gallardo, A boca de jarro, 2008, 6’36”, Ignacio Liprandi Arte Contemporáneo
Lucien Smith, I Like America and America Likes Me, 2013, 3’39″, Salon 94
Karen Kilimnik, …introducing Tabitha, 1991, 1’10”, 303 Gallery
Nicola Thomas, Dancing with Monk, 2013, 2’55”, courtesy of the artist
Takeshi Murata, Monster Movie, 2005, 4’12”, Salon 94, Ratio 3
Carlos Amorales with Julian Lede, Orellana’s Fantasia, 2013, 7′, Yvon Lambert, kurimanzutto
Tin Ojeda, Daughter, 2013, 7′, 303 Gallery
Friedrich Kunath, You Go Your Way and I’ll Go Crazy, 2012, 16’53”, Blum & Poe
Kemang Wa Lehulere, Lefu La Ntate, 2005, 3’1”, Stevenson
Avinash Veeraraghavan, Breathing charcoal soaked in a shallow forest stream, 2010, 4’20”, GallerySKE
Bill Balaskas, Parthenon Rising (II), 2011, 2’45”, Kalfayan Galleries
Pietro Roccasalva, Giocondità, 2002, 3’53”, Zero…
Bruce McLean, EARACHE: an Opera Bouffant, or ‘How Elvis’s Quiff Killed Johnnie Ray’, 2’08”, 2013, Tanya Leighton Gallery
William E. Jones, The Soviet Army Prepares for Action in Afghanistan, 2011, 2’55”, David Kordansky Gallery, The Modern Institute

Viewing Pod Selection
In addition to all the other works that have been in the outdoor Film program, the following works can be seen within the five interactive touchscreen viewing pods inside the Miami Beach Convention Center:
Adela Jušić, The Sniper, 2007, 4’09”, Alan Cristea Gallery
Kathan Brown, John Cage at Work (1978-1992), 2013, 44′, Crown Point Press
Ciprian Mureşan, Untitled (Monks), 2011, 12’13”, David Nolan Gallery
Suh Dongwook, Light on the water, 2011, 19’08”, One and J. Gallery
Song-Ming Ang, Be True to Your School, 2010, 12′, Singapore Tyler Print Institute
Raed Yassin, The New Film, 2008, 12′, Kalfayan Galleries
Carlos Amorales, Amsterdam, 2013, 21′, Yvon Lambert, kurimanzutto
Philippe Gruenberg, Domestic Landscape, 2010, 14’17”, Revolver Galería
Wiliam E. Jones, Bay of Pigs, 2012, 3’56”, David Kordansky Gallery, The Modern Institute

TRAILER

SOUNDSCAPES

www.artprojx.com

Dara Birnbaum and David Gryn in conversation

In Art, Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, Art Fair, Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, Dara Birnbaum, David Gryn, SoundScape Park on 06/12/2013 at 11:28 pm
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Arabesque by Dara Birnbaum. New World Center, SoundScape Park, Art Basel Miami Beach 2013

Dara Birnbaum and David Gryn in conversation at the Salon at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2013.

In the preceding months in advance of our talk at the Art Fair, we emailed various questions and answers to each other.

The talk will be online via Art Basel soon.

These questions and answers are probably more detailed than those in the live talk.

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Image: Dara Birnbaum, PM Magazine/Acid Rock, Marian Goodman Gallery

DB = Dara Birnbaum

DG = David Gryn

DB: Since you invited me and my work to ABMB 2013, I would be very curious as to the reasons behind your curating it in at this specific time.

DG: I had been thinking of works that I knew that would be ideal to play in the New World (Symphony) Center location, Arabesque was rooted in my thoughts, but stayed in the margins, due to its 4 screens (as seen at the South London Gallery), so your willingness to create a single screen version filled me with delight. 

DG: How does the single verses the 4 screen work for you ?

DB: But, I was willing to try and see if the component parts actually could be re-organized into the singular film frame. Of course, that frame is purposefully broken up and each of the constituent images perform in slightly different ways.

I very much had in mind this particular screening (its premiere) – of a incredibly large outdoor projection surface and the way people would be placed in relation to that screen image. I chose to make the appropriated film section larger, without being completely dominant – but regaining a declaration of “film” space. The quotations from YouTube run alongside, in their alternating pattern. When the Clara Schumann work is played, the frame is basically split in two – with the piano work composed by her via YouTube, alongside quotations from her diary.

DB: What issues and/or visual/audio enticements spurred you on, precisely now?

DG: I too am fascinated by the internet and how it and we are evolving with each other and all of its inherent languages. When I first discovered Clara Schumann, I thought I had discovered and unearthed a great mystery, as I thought her music was as or more magical than Robert Schumann’s. So I have always carried a torch for her and was always aware of the imbalance of the male/female relationship. What is it about Clara Schumann that inspires/inspired you ?

DB: I see the internet and YouTube, carried by the Internet, as two different, but interwoven, things/phenomenon. YouTube mainly being postings of performative works that people wish to have seen and/or remarkable documents, from performances to real life situations, etc.

I have respected Clara Schumann’s original musical compositions throughout the years, although they are not that well-known, or played in repertoire, etc. When I looked for the work by Clara Schumann, which I utilized in “Arabesque” I found, at the time, only one live recording of it on YouTube, yet it is a magnificent composition. Whereas, for the works of Robert Schumann there are hundreds of recordings that were made. I also “carried a torch” for Clara Schumann as she was a gifted pianist, who introduced the work of Robert Schumann to widening European audiences and fought for that music to be heard and known. Then, she had to balance a family of eight children and keep it all going while her husband was prone to mental illness, eventually taking his own life. When reading her diaries, I had mixed feelings about Clara, thinking that this maybe a woman I might not have “liked” (a nature toward an upper-class snobbery), but I definitely more than admired her strength and gifts.

DB: Of course, I know you are very supportive of “Arabesque” and its potential connection to this site-specific outdoor screening area, connected to, I believe, the Symphony Center in Miami Beach?

DG: I always try and think about the space, the place and the connections between places. So in Miami, I think about the New World Center, the Art Fair and the City of Miami and how they all relate and interact. I have a sense of broadcasting out of the wall from the music center to the art center/fair/festival. 

DB: “Arabesque” was originaly made as a large-scale installation – some 40+ feet in length and more than 6 ft. in height for the projections. The audio is treated in a most seriously and there are stereo channels/speakers for each of the 4 video channels of the work. So, you would enter into a darkened chamber of image and sound. It was meant to be an acoustical chamber as much as a visual art work. Now it is important to see how the work will respond to a different environment, one that puts it in-situ with a well established place for musical performance, The New World Center. It is like turning the inside out and directing a symbolic core out to an audience under the night sky. It will probably be like a – hopefully effective – “broadcast” but as with a broadcast, you get a secondary feeling from it. It brings you closer (through the enlarged and exaggerated image) but is still regulated to being a singular very large frame, like perhaps getting infinitely close to a painting, but without really being able to see the brushstrokes – just a large gestalt of the real.

DG: I have been fascinated by the relationship of the NWC to the Art Fair and the spaces inbetween, how audience react to the two and how one brings a city together for projects. I also see the wall of the NWC as a monitor to what goes on inside (ie the making of music) – so when I made the request to you for a single screen version of Arabesque – it was because I couldn’t imagine anything more appropriate, the focus on Clara Schumann. The projection of the inside to the outside. There is also the image of Kathryn Hepburn which brings along a Hollywood favourite too – which also has a resonance to our audience here. How did you see this all working ? and did/does it work as you hoped ?

DB: When asked to perform the work as a single-channel video, I very much had in mind the scope of the 7,000 square foot screen. Thereby, I thought to allow the film/movie image of, for example, Kathryn Hepburn, to reign larger than in the installation version of “Arabesque.” It seemed appropriate to let the captioned film segments loom slightly larger, yet not allow them to take over.

DG: As a result of thinking about you and your work and selecting older works too, I have realised that I have the hugest resource for programming film at an Art Fair … the last 40 years of moving image making by artists. The new is often limited and the old often neglected in lieu of venerating the fresh and exciting and not the experienced and acknowledged. The audience here and probably everywhere has seen so little. 

Which artists would you show and why?

DB: Let me think about this more. I would probably show a combination of early works and recent contemporary work. I like that combination. It is sometimes hard to capture a general audience with work that is “difficult,” but very exceptional and worthwhile. That is always hard to do with large audiences and continuous programs within the context of art fairs, where usually art work is looked at very quickly and then one moves on, unless they almost “trip” upon something that is profoundly to their liking (or that has gained advance publicity through the press.) Perhaps the screenings will command a necessary reparation from the fragmentation of the art fairs. It is sometimes very good to have a place to sit and allow for moving image works, in their entirety, to be absorbed, after a day of utter fragmentation.

DB: Are you also interested, culturally, as to when these works were formulated – what surrounding atmosphere and sphere of activity helped propel them forward ?

DG:  With regards to gender/feminism – what were the conditions that shaped you at the launch of your career ?. It seems that performance and video were fairly new areas to explore in the 70‘s and thus not already dominated by men – so was it that the timing was just right ? or ? It is interesting to know what made you feel the need to make Arabesque and the current status of gender balance (and hierarchies) in the art world and the wider world ?

DB: There has been much speculation that since video was a fairly new area to explore in the 70s, it was not already dominated by men. There is some truth to that, although I felt that many male artists were – and still are – seen as a predominant force. I know that I was, at first, most affected by a number of male artists using video – such as Nauman, Acconci, and Graham. Then, the grandfather of video was seen as Nam June Paik. “Radical Software,” an exceptional early magazine/journal on video was male dominated (such as Frank Gillette, Ira Schneider, and Paul Ryan.) I was less aware of the work of Joan Jonas or Carolee Schneemann, for example. I was aware of Simon Forti, or others oriented in performance and movement, such as Trisha Brown and Yvonne Rainer. But, the real use and exploration of video remained somewhat with male artists – such as Bill Viola and Gary Hill. However, the equipment started to be readily available through small post-production studios funded by grants, etc. When I first encountered video, in Florence, Italy, through the gallery, Centro Diffusione dell Grafica, many well-known artists came through and were encouraged to do video works (around 1974) by the gallery’s owner/director Maria Gloria Bicocchi. Then there were artists such as Vito Acconci, Charlemagne Palestine, and Joan Jonas. That is how I was first exposed to video as an art form. However, the main control was in the hands of a few young men, Italian and primarily studying architecture. I thought I would never get my hands on the equipment. So, I returned to NYC, where several artists coming through  Florence, told me it was very active in the arts (mid-70s.) Someone lent me a portapak and my first works were made (1975.)

“Arabesque” like many of my works from early on concentrates on the representation of women, or their stereotyping or lost identity. This begins with “Technology/ Transformation: Wonder Woman” in 1978/9 and goes through more contemporary works, such as “Erwartung” (2001), and now “Arabesque” (2011.)

Even the “Damnation of Faust Trilogy” (1983-1987) brings significance to the role of the woman (who is seen taking both the identity of “Faust” and “Marguerite/Gretchen.”) At the end of that work, social and political identity supplant singular female identity. “Canon: Taking to the Street” (1990) also delves into individual identity (especially, but not limited to, violence perpetrated on women – but also extended to men.) It relates individual identity and victimization through the strength to be found in group/societal relations.

We can, of course, talk about the need for a feminist practice in the art world – and in the world-at-large.

DG: The show curated at Wilkinson by Karen Archey, with artists such Cory Arcangel – was a celebration of your role at the helm of appropriation from TV and the internet. How was this for you ? Which younger artists to you admire and why ?

DB: Unfortunately, I was not offered to be brought over for the show by Karen Archey at Wilkinson Gallery. So, I have no real idea how it came across, although I felt honored to be put in that position. I know Cory Arcangel. We were put together by “Artforum” several years ago to do the cover story for one issue – a dialogue between us. I think you can still find it online. Not sure. I can see Cory as the next generation to me and had a great time conversing with him, as well as getting to know his work on a deeper level of understanding. Most of the artists in the show curated by Karen Archey I did not know. Nor, unfortunately have I gotten a chance to know them. I find this true of a lot of work by younger artists today. In all honesty it is hard for me to keep up. I can keep up with a generation following me, like Cory, whom I have admiration for. Other artists are the ones I know through colleagues, or people I have worked with – for example – at Electronic Arts Intermix. I know, through EAI’s collection, artists like Ryan Trecartin, Seth Price, Shana Moulton, Kalup Linzy, Antoine Catala, Michael Bell-Smith, etc. I follow at a distance the work of people like Isaac Julien. Through the Marian Goodman Gallery I know Steve McQueen’s and William Kentridge’s work in-depth. But of course they are both advanced in their careers and not younger artists. I don’t follow artists working with the internet, or that Karen Archey feels are affected by the internet.

DG: What are your current influences and driving thoughts ?

DB: I am most affected by historical positions – such as I was with the installation work “Erwartung” (re-examining a moment in time, in that case the beginning of the 20th c. and “the woman” as portrayed by Marie Pappenheim in her libretto for Schoenberg’s opera.) I have been traumatized by our political positions in the U.S., especially in relation to the wars we have carried out in the Mideast and our treatment of the environment. So, I seem to have (perhaps retreated) turned my attention on gender politics – with works such as “Tapestry: An Elergy for Donna” (2005, lesser known installation), or lately with “Arabesque” (2011.) I was recently attempting to work on another opera “La Sonnabula” by Bellini, whose main character is a woman who sleepwalks. I hit a wall and am trying to knock it down, or go around it. I seem more affected by incredible historical works than by most of the art that is happening today. The current political positions of the U.S. and the trauma of the bombing of the “World Trade Center,” which I was an eye witness to, have left a part of me speechless.

DG: Are there any outstanding events that have significantly shaped you as an artist ? 

DB: I felt that I “grew up” during the years I lived in Berkeley, California – from 1970-1974. It was a hotbed of political activity in the U.S. Those years and the philosophies of the continuance of the New Left movements from that crucible greatly affected me and are the core of what all my early works were derived from, along with a strong attention to the role of women, as portrayed through mass media. So, the earliest works like “Lesson Plans: To Keep the Revolution Alive” (1977) where from this foundation and my increasing interest in the role of dominant media (as television) within our culture. From Berkeley, as well, I became aware of the women’s movement. Then other events greatly affected me along the way – the first bombing of the World Trade Center (producing the work on terrorism, entitled “Hostage,” 1994), or the events of “Tiananmen Square” (“Tiananmen Square: Break-In Transmission,” 1990.) The Gulf War greatly affected me (“Transmission Tower: Sentinel,” 1992, commissioned by documenta IX.) Then, I let my politics emerge more through an active position with various groups (rather than through my art), such as “Care 2,” “Move On,” and many environmental and animal rights groups. I continued with my desire to investigate and re-portray the role of women within technocratic cultures, but I haven’t been able to directly take-on the vast and extraordinarily complex political situation of today. In other words, I have been “terrorized.”

DG: How has the art world environment changed since you started ? How do you see the art environment now ? My environment has changed by there being more art fairs and their dominance reigns, and over the growth of the Art Fair phenomenon, there has been incrementally less and less galleries showing video/film at Art Fairs. My view is that it remains a relative non-commodity, thus not deemed appropriate for Art Fairs, but needs to be seen by the Art (Fair) appreciating audience, which now focusses their art viewing attention on Art Fair seasons. 

DB: I feel a bit lost in the corporate values of today’s art world, from my point-of-reference. I had great admiration for the arts developed the generation before me.

I had been affected by “conceptual art” and the early works of Daniel Buren and Michael Asher, for example. Then of course by both the Pop Art movement, in my years growing up in NYC (like Warhol and Lichtenstein), and also the minimalists (like LeWitt), along with Flavin, Andre, etc. Then it was the work of Acconci and Graham that influenced me.

Unfortunately, you can see that I am only naming male artists! The women I was drawn to were more along the line of performance art – especially Trisha Brown, Yvonne Rainer, and Simone Forti. There is a great discrepancy in relation to the “value” of the work of art in what Lippard determined as “the dematerialization of the art object” and the value placed on “works” of art today. I was more interested in process than product. In video I thought that my work would be more along the lines of unlimited editions (such as with the single-channel video work, as distributed through organizations and non-profits such as EAI) and was more involved with video distribution than I was with “collection.” Now there is an attempt to control everything, in light of the edition and marketing of art works, along with the terrible concern of “ownership” (as shown through the need for proper releases and concern with copyright, etc.) I also don’t like the engagement and cross-over with the fashion industry, the entertainment industry, and the arts.

DG: How do you see the relationship between art and the commodity ? and can they really exist together ?

DB: This has been a question throughout much of our Western European-American history, especially since the Renaissance. The two have been endlessly entangled in Western European culture (and now throughout other cultures in the world, as the MidEast, Qatar, for example.) Art becomes commodified, beyond its essential existence or “soul.” Some of the best work of our culture – performances by Trisha Brown and Company are, in essence, non-commodified or not as easily commodified. Commodification limits the ability to concentrate on process and brings down the essence of the work to object nature and product. I am more a believer in the authenticity of the artistic statement, which becomes more removed the more commodification takes place. Of course there are artists who play on this edge, such as Jeff Koons and Damian Hirst.

DG: What would your advice be to a young artist with a view to empowering them ?

DB: It is hard to give great advice to younger artists. Patti Smith has tried to tell younger artists to get out of New York City, that it can no longer support the position of a real artist. David Byrne has recently done the same. When rents and living necessities are sky-high, it is hard to think clearly about one’s art. However, NYC and London, for example still service as hubs for young artists. The resources of NYC, for example, are priceless – such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Opera, and MoMA, amongst so much else. I like for younger artists to stay as independent as possible of “the hype” and to progress at their own rate. A hard thing to do now-in-days with so much pressure on them. When I came back to NYC (from Europe) in 1975, specifically to engage in the arts, my rent was $125/month for a full floor small loft in the downtown area. I was able to waitress three days a week, make my rent, and also do my art.

DG: How do you relate to our ever evolving space of the internet and the gadgets that we use to explore and utilise it ?

I use the internet for communication and for research. I haven’t been able to make art work directly inspired by it, or on it, other than using the voices of YouTube, as with “Arabesque.” I used to never use FaceBook and now find myself checking it – ever so rapidly (like speed reading) – at the end of each day. I find many postings of worthwhile articles, along with death notices that hit there before they are announced in newspapers, etc. I rapidly scan it and find what I am most interested in and need. I have about 5,000 friends and that seems to do it.

I am usually against “gadgets,” but can see things as working tools. For example, I own a iPad mini that goes almost everywhere with me. However, I still don’t own a smart phone! When I am waiting for someone, or for a meal, or in a doctor’s office I do research now. I love the instantaneous access to information and the wide breathe of it. But, one must be aware that every action is now under surveillance and that even our email is being read (such as Google looking for which ads are to be directed at us, based upon our communication.) Uncensored access to information is most important to me.

Copyright: David Gryn and Dara Birnbaum