David Gryn blog

Posts Tagged ‘Hammer Museum’

Is Online Art The Future ? Aston Martin feature on Daata Editions

In Amalia Ulman, Art, Art Basel, Aston Martin, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, David Hockney, digital art, Elizabeth Dee, Julia Stoschek, Saya Woolfalk, Scott Reeder, Uncategorized, Zuecca Projects on 08/07/2016 at 10:53 am
Aston Martin Daata Editions

Image: Tracey Emin, I Lay Here, 2016 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions

 

Art transcends culture, echoes its roots and is integral
to the documentation of the human experience

For an artwork to reflect the musings of its creators, it should ideally be able to naturally adapt. While a ‘physical’ piece of art may be moved or displaced, its very form cannot. The intellectually satisfying aspect of enjoying a painting for example, will come from discovering (or rediscovering) a detail we have missed or overlooked. A brush stroke or a shaft of sunlight can add new meaning to a well-loved piece, without altering it per sae. Since the dawn of the Internet in the 1980s, artists have exploited the laws of this parallel world to create events, images, or to subvert the way we visually absorb information.
Part of the attraction is its global reach, the use of cutting-edge technology and the liberation of art from the constraints of traditional wealth-creating establishments such as commercial galleries, auction houses, private collectors and public museums. Then there’s how we as viewers actually relate to virtual or digital art and one of the most exciting features of a digital piece of art is that it is ever changing. While we may be familiar with its initial subject, it will surprise us as it moves and transforms, inviting us to engage.

Though digital pieces have found a home in some of the art world’s most heavyweight institutions, many collectors still need convincing.

Enter Daata Editions: an online gallery utterly dedicated to video, sound and web art, launched in May 2015, showcasing artists’ video, sound, web and poetry works, available to view and acquire on the website as digital downloads in limited editions. Featured on Daata Editions is Argentinian-born Spanish Artist Amalia Ulman whose series, ‘White Flag Emojis’, displays short videos that create a powerful feeling of apprehension. Ulman is also known for exploring social media in her work, Excellences and Perfections, a poignant four-month long art project in which she creates a fake persona on her Instagram page with thousands of followers. The thought-provoking series throws up important questions on the pitfalls of easily manufactured online “fame”, while, perhaps ironically, highlighting the power of digital art in doing so.

The founder of Daata Editions, David Gryn, and his team have a strong reputation worldwide for producing, curating and promoting artists’ audio visual projects and events that have consistently excited and attracted large audiences, and introduced new audiences to the arts. Gryn says that digital and downloadable art is the future, a belief confirmed by David Hockney who in 2011 began creating works to be viewed exclusively on an Ipad, thus allowing him broader perspective and freedom of adaptability when working.

Daata Editions artworks form part of the Hammer Museum Contemporary Collection, US; the Julia Stoschek Collection, Germany; KIASMA, Finland and the Zabludowicz Collection, UK. Collectors, including Robert and Renee Drake, The Netherlands, as well as galleries, including Elizabeth Dee, New York and Marc Foxx, Los Angeles, have purchased multiple artworks from the platform.

Things are moving all the time, so watch out for fresh new works Daata Editions will be launching in the next months. Artists will include the likes of Saya Woolfalk, Larry Achiampong, Scott Reeder and Tameka Norris. In addition, Daata Editions in collaboration with Zuecca Projects presents Gentrification, an exhibition with new works by artists Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, at BBAR, Bauer Hotel, Venice, to coincide with the 15th Venice Architecture Biennale.

5 Questions with Daata Editions – Elephant Magazine

In Art Basel, Charles Richardson, Chloe Wise, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Blandy, David Gryn, Elephant, Uncategorized, Video on 21/11/2015 at 10:59 am

5 Questions with Daata Editions

http://www.elephantmag.com/5-questions-with-daata-editions/

Text by Emily Steer

Daata Editions is an online platform that commissions digital artists’ editions—mostly video-, sound- and web-based. Season One brought together eighteen artists, who each created six pieces of work, last month joining two different collections in completion; Germany’s Julia Stoschek Collection and LA’s Hammer Museum.

Season One featured the work of; Ilit Azoulay, Helen Benigson, David Blandy, Matt Copson, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Daniel Keller & Martti Kalliala, Lina Lapelyte, Rachel Maclean, Florian Meisenberg, Takeshi Murata, Hannah Perry, Jon Rafman, Charles Richardson, Amalia Ulman, Stephen Vitiello and Chloe Wise.

Here, five of the artists discuss the purpose of digital platforms in the present art world and the future of art online.

When did you start work with Daata Editions, and what do you feel online platforms can offer to digital artists?

Chloe Wise: I began working with Daata Editions for their first iteration–or season of artists I suppose–about a year ago now. For an emerging artist, especially for an artist working with digital media, it can be hard to find viewership, a consumer market, a collector base, the funds with which to produce work, and a comprehensive placement within the art world for oneself. Working with Daata Editions not only enabled the artists, including myself, to create work that otherwise may not have been made, but to circulate this work in the context of art fairs, screenings both indoors and outdoors, in a gallery setting as well as online and placing the works into great collections and institutions. This visibility and accessibility is imperative to digital work, which is in a state of growth and change, and is so easily dismissed in the constant flow of images and videos on the internet.

As a digital artist, do you consider the fit of your work on the market, or is this a secondary concern? 

Florian Meisenberg: When creating either a digital or analogue art work, I don’t start by thinking about it fitting into the market. Generally, my motivation to create art is not dependent on its degree of ‘fitability’ with anything. Although sometimes I feel embarrassed that I can’t sign my videos.

Have you felt the reception towards digital work change in any way since you began your practice?  

David Blandy: When I started exhibiting, the digital world of computing, gaming and the Internet were marginal cultural interests, the preserve of geeks like me. The Internet was dial up, computer games were making their first experiments in 3D graphics, and VHS was the standard exhibition format for video. So my work thinking about and using digital culture, using backgrounds from video games and performances inside virtual spaces, were seen as pretty alien from mainstream culture and were probably pretty mystifying to an artworld that was largely computer illiterate. Now the digital is central to our everyday visual culture–CGI on tv, adverts, films, every photo is computer manipulated, only occasional heads unbowed at train stations, contemplating the sky rather than their phone.

Do you feel that your work exists in accordance with the technology it was created for? Or is the material something that could be transferred to different tech over the years?

Matt Copson: My work exists in accordance but is not enslaved by current technology. I’m sure things would change radically with any contextual shifts, be they technological, political or financial but hopefully my work isn’t just a symptom of its time. Most of the more digital aspects of my work and installations are basic or quite a primitive use of more complex programs. I don’t care for professionalising my skills, rather I enjoy being an enthusiastic amateur with a level of distance from the technology I’m using. I like the idea of using photoshop in the same way I’d carve a sculpture with a chainsaw and sledgehammer. I see no reason why works couldn’t be transferred to different technology over the years. But my principal concern, of course, is in how they are shown/heard in the present.

What do you see being the biggest driver of digital art in the future?

Helen Benigson: I am sure the continuous and accelerating trend of the public giving up personal data to big companies will lead to some very interesting work being made. However, I also feel that as the body becomes even more exploited through medical and visceral mediation online, artists will necessarily need to drive a new concept of what intimacy, privacy and the corporeal looks like. I don’t think there has ever been more of a crucial time to bring art and technology together, than the current climate we are living in. There is increasingly a general blurring of boundaries and a development of terms such as the ‘creative’ or ‘cultural producer’, via the recruitment of artists into the technology industry which has a more general emphasis on the idea of creativity at work across many different industry sectors. Many of the concepts that have shaped the working culture in the tech industry (such as ‘play’, live-work, loft spaces and temporary contracts) are derived from artists’ working habits, like Second Home and its relationship to the Serpentine Pavilion. It is essential to understand these messy overlaps in order to try to decipher how and where art will move to as artists move away from big cities and increasingly have to work more online in order to survive.

All works: 2015, Courtesy Daata Editions

Loreta Lamargese text on Daata Editions

In Art, Art Basel, Art Fair, Chloe Wise, Daata, Digital, Frieze, Gryn, Hammer, NADA, Online, Rafman, Sound, Stoschek, Video, Zabludowicz on 19/10/2015 at 10:54 am
Chloe Wise, should I add an emoji, 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Chloe Wise, should I add an emoji, 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Loreta Lamargese on Daata Editions

Daata Editions offers a novel platform to solve a longstanding concern: how to commodify, collect, and distribute intangible and already-networked digital artwork. Probing this question reveals a nested paradox: while we’ve become increasingly reliant upon and enthralled by the digital, artworks that employ new media are thought of as being positioned outside the art market. It is becoming more and more difficult to disentangle ourselves from the digital web and artists – like all those included in the three artwork releases from Daata Editions Season One – are using its medial language to engage with their surroundings. At the same time, it is inane to think that we don’t rely heavily on the market – one that has thus far been thought to absorb only singular and static objects – and that the market isn’t a chief harbinger controlling which artworks and artists receive visibility and clout. And yet, many artists who reject a tradition of trading solely in tangible and discrete art objects, who use digitality as both a site that needs mining and as a material to be manipulated, are visible and powerful contenders in the current contemporary art arena.

What makes Daata Editions particularly significant at our present moment is that it fuses the seeming discord between the market and digital material, organizing artists’ video, sound, and web-based work and having that work available online as editions. In fact, Daata makes clear that these two apparently dissonant entities depend on similar structures, relying on a rapid and seamless transition of information; both are, after all, networked and global. The artists presented in Daata Editions are producing works that operate beyond the sanctified walls of galleries and are experimenting with the fungibility of concepts that fit diverse media and operate on these diverse platforms simultaneously. Similarly, while Daata is primarily stationed online, it does not limit itself to the borderless web, involving additional presentations at art fairs such as a recent collaboration with NADA New York.

Now with its third artwork release, it is safe to say the initial hypothesis that launched the platform is true: that when given an intuitive mode to consume and sell digital artwork – when given the opportunity to purchase new media on indigenous soil- collectors would take ownership. Editions by artists such as Amalia Ulman, Chloe Wise, Ed Fornieles, Jon Rafman, and Leo Gabin made available through Daata Editions are now housed in preeminent international collections including the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, The Zabludowicz Collection, London, and The Julia Stoschek Collection in Dusseldorf. And while private collectors and institutions alike fold moving images and sound works into their collections, artists continue to expand the limits of contemporary art practices, renegotiating our reliance on any particular medium or site.

While I’m hesitant to stress the intrinsically utopic qualities of digital art, its malleability with place and material affords it distance from hermeneutic singularity or ontological fixity. The dynamic chain of reformatting that these digital works undergo lends them to active and multifarious meanings and concepts. For example, Chloe Wise’s series created for Daata Editions, Do You Really Think He Fingered Her?, sees the artist subverting the notion of determined and legible identification. In this collection of videos, we find a friend and collaborator of the artist, Robyn Fox, reciting overheard phrases and the Twitter feeds of Art Basel Miami Beach attendees and friends of the artist. Because Fox is costumed in Wise’s clothes and because Wise often uses her own image in her artwork, we are compelled to read Fox as Wise, collapsing barriers of individualization normally fixed to bodies. And why shouldn’t we? If the video itself, as well as the material from social media that Fox recites, proliferates on multiple channels and in different formats at overlapping intervals, then why should identities and meaning be fixed and contained rather than performed and adaptable?

Since its emergence, artists working with video have struggled to monetize their practice while making hefty contributions to the history of art, changing our modes of perceiving and altering our relationship to objects and images. The current generation of young artists working in new media, including those presented in Daata Editions, is widening the net of possibilities under which image creation and circulation can exist. They are entering the conversation at a vital moment, one in which new economic platforms attempt to keep up with them, finding original means to sell and distribute migrant and non-discrete objects. Daata Editions is an early contributor to this new economy, which not only considers but also focuses and exists within the digital realm. Now entering its third artwork release, Daata Editions has tested these murky waters, shedding light on the possibilities of nurturing and distributing artwork that gains dynamism through circulation – through the very media it takes from.

Loreta Lamargese is a curator and researcher based in Montreal, Canada and works at Galerie Division

Galerie Division http://www.galeriedivision.com/montreal/

Daata Editions http://daata-editions.com