David Gryn blog

Posts Tagged ‘Ed Fornieles’

i-D: daata editions and digital art’s commercial future

In Uncategorized on 28/01/2016 at 12:00 pm

iD

Felix Petty 28 January, 2016

We speak to David Gryn of Daata Editions about creating a viable vehicle for selling art online, as the platform releases its newest collection of artworks to the public.

Ed Fornieles, Sitting

The art market can easily feel over blown, over hyped, over saturated, stuffed full of money, and of course that’s partly true, though not if you’re an artist or gallery dealing in digital work. As a recent exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery, Electronic Superhighway, shows, computer and internet technology has been having an impact on the art world since the mid 60s, but critical acclaim and visionary work doesn’t always open up the high end art of the market, if it finds a market at all.

This is where Daata Editions come in, an online platform featuring the work of 18 artists, with work commissioned specifically for sale over the internet. The first series of works features artists as diverse, talented and striking as Ilit Azoulay, David Blandy, Ed Fornieles, Jon Rafman, Amalia Ulman, Takeshi Murata, Hannah Perry and Chloe Wise. Existing somewhere between eCommerce platform and online gallery, Daata is a new solution to a problems as old as the internet itself ; how to commodify the intangible and create a distribution model that helps artists get paid for the work they do.

Amalia Ulman, White Flag Emoji

What made you want to start Daata?
What we’re trying to do is make Daata as a model for selling digital art, not the model. I wanted Daata to be about how the internet works, how you go into a website and look at art. If you go to an art fair there are 250 galleries. They don’t operate in identical ways but they all do something very similar. They sell art, they show art, and often they represent the artists really well. We aren’t a gallery, we don’t represent artists, but we function somewhat similarly. Daata grew from the logic of a market place for digital forms of artwork, we want to commission artists to make artwork so that artists can get paid.

We need lots of galleries to have a market place. You need thousands of artists to have an art world, you need lots of museums, but when it’s digital everyone wants to be the dominant model, to have the next .com sensation. Daata is simply a model that allows us commission artists to produce work and actually pay them for it. It’s a niche entity, we aren’t trying to be all things too all people.

I want it to be easy. For me the internet seems to be an easy solution not a complicated problem, but I don’t think most of the art world has arrived there yet. The art world still seems to want to resist it because it seems quite complicated.

David Blandy, Moon

Why do you think the art world has been so resistant to the digital art market?
Well I think it’s resistant because in contemporary art there’s a traditional process to things. We know how to buy and sell a good and therefore, we want to carry on buying and selling a good — that makes sense. But if things are online, suddenly a gallery or an artist feels they have less control. To me digital is just another medium, I don’t see it as being any different to oil paintings, or sculptures. But people seem to want to know how it all works or how you fit it into the techno-modern age. But this is the age we’re in, I think the art world’s coming round to it. The digital is a real, natural language now amongst almost everybody making art. But I think the marketplace has to take it seriously, and they struggle with that, because it doesn’t hit the high prices yet. You know you can sell a painting for a million pounds, but digital work sells for a few hundred.

Hannah Perry, The Worse You Feel The Better I Look

What draws you to the artists you work with?
Many of the artists when I was commissioning them, I said I want you to feel that you can experiment and do what you will with the platform, but at least experiment as best as you can. But partly it’s about working with artists who get it. Jon Rafman and Ed Fornieles are two artists who actually gave us a lot of advice when we were setting Daata up, and we commissioned works from them. Chloe Wise is a really passionate advocate of it, she’s up for promoting herself, her work, those artists to me are very special. Not all artists can be and are like that but it’s very helpful. And many artists have to gone on to use the work we commissioned in their future projects and exhibitions.

Chloe Wise, Should I Add An Emoji?

Is it about finding a piece of work that can exist beyond the digital?
To be honest, I kind of go to the artist as opposed to the artwork. We commissioned artists who we trust. The only brief was that it couldn’t be more than three minutes long. But not every artist I know would be right for it and some artists have different ways of working — some artists don’t want their work to be sold, some artists don’t want to make money, some artists do. I wanted to go to people who are rated as artists first.

Florian Meisenberg, Rghwori

What do you think the future of Daata will end up being?
The future is indeterminable, which is nice, because we are evolving. I mean my aim is that this becomes sort of a service a bit like Netflix or Spotify. However, within its own niche, there are other ways to make money out of those things, maybe it’s sponsored? Maybe it’s supported by philanthropy? Maybe it’s connected to museums? We want the work to be available to everybody, not just those who can buy it. I think the digital world is becoming just part of our natural consciousness.

Takeshi Murata, Pumpjack Popeye

Do you think that will only increase as young people, who’ve grown up using computers, become larger parts or the art world and art market?
There are artists who just work using digital as some artists might use paint. There are artists, like Rachel Rose or Ian Cheng, who just treat is as a natural language and medium and I think that’s when it starts looking like artwork, you start believing in it as art, as opposed to you just being wowed by the technical mastery the artist possesses.

I still feel that there’s a resistance though, and I’ve seen it in quite a few art schools where you have video artists being encouraged by their art departments to put their videos into sculptural installations to give it some kind of marketable commodity and I think that’s disappointing. It feels like saying ‘let’s make the work look more complicated and buyable by making it into a sculpture’ than actually just saying, ‘well that work was good enough.’

The fourth set of Season One artworks are released 28 January and can be purchased online at daata-editions.com

CreditsText Felix Petty
All images courtesy the artists and Daata Editions
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Loreta Lamargese text on Daata Editions

In Art, Art Basel, Art Fair, Chloe Wise, Daata, Digital, Frieze, Gryn, Hammer, NADA, Online, Rafman, Sound, Stoschek, Video, Zabludowicz on 19/10/2015 at 10:54 am
Chloe Wise, should I add an emoji, 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Chloe Wise, should I add an emoji, 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Loreta Lamargese on Daata Editions

Daata Editions offers a novel platform to solve a longstanding concern: how to commodify, collect, and distribute intangible and already-networked digital artwork. Probing this question reveals a nested paradox: while we’ve become increasingly reliant upon and enthralled by the digital, artworks that employ new media are thought of as being positioned outside the art market. It is becoming more and more difficult to disentangle ourselves from the digital web and artists – like all those included in the three artwork releases from Daata Editions Season One – are using its medial language to engage with their surroundings. At the same time, it is inane to think that we don’t rely heavily on the market – one that has thus far been thought to absorb only singular and static objects – and that the market isn’t a chief harbinger controlling which artworks and artists receive visibility and clout. And yet, many artists who reject a tradition of trading solely in tangible and discrete art objects, who use digitality as both a site that needs mining and as a material to be manipulated, are visible and powerful contenders in the current contemporary art arena.

What makes Daata Editions particularly significant at our present moment is that it fuses the seeming discord between the market and digital material, organizing artists’ video, sound, and web-based work and having that work available online as editions. In fact, Daata makes clear that these two apparently dissonant entities depend on similar structures, relying on a rapid and seamless transition of information; both are, after all, networked and global. The artists presented in Daata Editions are producing works that operate beyond the sanctified walls of galleries and are experimenting with the fungibility of concepts that fit diverse media and operate on these diverse platforms simultaneously. Similarly, while Daata is primarily stationed online, it does not limit itself to the borderless web, involving additional presentations at art fairs such as a recent collaboration with NADA New York.

Now with its third artwork release, it is safe to say the initial hypothesis that launched the platform is true: that when given an intuitive mode to consume and sell digital artwork – when given the opportunity to purchase new media on indigenous soil- collectors would take ownership. Editions by artists such as Amalia Ulman, Chloe Wise, Ed Fornieles, Jon Rafman, and Leo Gabin made available through Daata Editions are now housed in preeminent international collections including the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, The Zabludowicz Collection, London, and The Julia Stoschek Collection in Dusseldorf. And while private collectors and institutions alike fold moving images and sound works into their collections, artists continue to expand the limits of contemporary art practices, renegotiating our reliance on any particular medium or site.

While I’m hesitant to stress the intrinsically utopic qualities of digital art, its malleability with place and material affords it distance from hermeneutic singularity or ontological fixity. The dynamic chain of reformatting that these digital works undergo lends them to active and multifarious meanings and concepts. For example, Chloe Wise’s series created for Daata Editions, Do You Really Think He Fingered Her?, sees the artist subverting the notion of determined and legible identification. In this collection of videos, we find a friend and collaborator of the artist, Robyn Fox, reciting overheard phrases and the Twitter feeds of Art Basel Miami Beach attendees and friends of the artist. Because Fox is costumed in Wise’s clothes and because Wise often uses her own image in her artwork, we are compelled to read Fox as Wise, collapsing barriers of individualization normally fixed to bodies. And why shouldn’t we? If the video itself, as well as the material from social media that Fox recites, proliferates on multiple channels and in different formats at overlapping intervals, then why should identities and meaning be fixed and contained rather than performed and adaptable?

Since its emergence, artists working with video have struggled to monetize their practice while making hefty contributions to the history of art, changing our modes of perceiving and altering our relationship to objects and images. The current generation of young artists working in new media, including those presented in Daata Editions, is widening the net of possibilities under which image creation and circulation can exist. They are entering the conversation at a vital moment, one in which new economic platforms attempt to keep up with them, finding original means to sell and distribute migrant and non-discrete objects. Daata Editions is an early contributor to this new economy, which not only considers but also focuses and exists within the digital realm. Now entering its third artwork release, Daata Editions has tested these murky waters, shedding light on the possibilities of nurturing and distributing artwork that gains dynamism through circulation – through the very media it takes from.

Loreta Lamargese is a curator and researcher based in Montreal, Canada and works at Galerie Division

Galerie Division http://www.galeriedivision.com/montreal/

Daata Editions http://daata-editions.com

Collecting on the Cloud, a digital exchange with David Gryn of Daata by Sylvia Wu, SCREEN

In Art, Art Basel, Daata Editions, Digital, Frieze, SCREEN, Sound, Video, Web, Zabludowicz on 10/10/2015 at 7:55 pm

photo: David Gryn by Jane Bustin

Sylvia Wu’s conversation with David Gryn, director of Daata Editions, On New Models of Selling Digital Art, is now live on SCREEN, a New York-based bilingual platform aiming to redefine media art.

http://www.onscreentoday.com/conversation/art-collecting-in-the-air

With the fall coming up, the relatively quiet holiday season will burst into a kaleidoscope of exhibitions and events. Alongside the physical world, several online sales platforms are also making their voices heard. Daata Editions, created by Art Basel’s Curator of Film, David Gryn, and collector Anita Zabludowicz, is among the most active. Launched in May this year, Daata Editions has made some great sales of its artist commissioned video, sound and web art editions, and perhaps more importantly, it has established a fresh model for selling and buying digital art. On its website, Daata Editions has currently two releases from “Season 1” of artist commissioned works including a collaboration between Martti Kalliala and Daniel Keller, and videos by Takeshi Murata. To figure out more about Daata’s language and concepts, SCREEN was in conversation with David Gryn, who previously said “We need to believe that, in the same way we easily buy music and films online via the likes of iTunes or Amazon, we can buy art via digital files and not have to [physically] possess an object to give a work its validation”1

SCREEN: We know that you curate Art Basel’s film sector where you can observe the market for digital art. But how exactly did the initial idea of creating Daata Editions come to you?

David Gryn: I worked with Art Basel for five years, and before that with various major other art fairs. It was obvious that galleries really don’t think about bringing films, videos, sound and other digital media to art fairs because they haven’t found a way to sell them. It dawned to me that something needs to be done about this, not just by one person but by many. I’ve never been a big believer in the market place per se, but I do believe that you need to have a market place where artists who make good digital artworks can be supported.

So our model of creating Daata Editions is the idea to start commissioning artists, paying them and giving them royalties, marketing the process and what they create, and I came together with these thoughts with collector and philanthropist Anita Zabludowicz, whom I’ve known for a long time. We came from different spectrums of the art world, me working with the art directly and not involved in the market place, while Anita collecting art passionately but also supporting artists and students. She believes in the ecosystem of the art world like I do, and the evolving concept of Daata was something we mutually agreed with.

S: What differs Daata Editions from other online sales platforms?

DG: We are not trying to be different. What we are building is our own bespoke, boutique model. I’m not looking at this being reinventing the wheel, but that we’ve created Daata Editions to present artists who make artworks with digital media, video, web, sound works. It works for that medium as well as we can possibly do within a finite model. Where it may differ from others is that we are very restricted to what we are focused on doing—we are commissioning, any one time, currently 18 artists per “season”. We pay the artists upfront to make the works, which is quite unusual in the art world. They also receive a royalty, which is also quite unusual.

A snapshot of the “Artists” page on the Daata Editions website. The background picture is a frame from Leo Gabin’s “Write Your Name”.

I hope that there are many models, and we are one of many. My view is that we’ll do it very well and hopefully other people will also do well. Just like you need many good galleries in an art fair, and you need many of them in a neighborhood to make it an art center that people might travel to visit. One good thing doesn’t form a market place, but often dominance. What often happens with digital business in the art world is that there’s a desire to be dominant because of the idea of monopoly. You could be the next big thing, the next Facebook or the next Twitter. We are not trying to be that. We are trying to put artists at the center of what we are doing, representing mediums that are actually very much commonplace amongst artists. Really commonplace. It’s almost ridiculous that most artists use digital media even if they are painters, to some degree to research or to communicate. But somehow the art market hasn’t found a way to reflect that yet. And galleries really find it difficult to find a business model around those works and how to find the commodified market place. We are working with art forms that are still finding their feet in that area but we are also working with them because we believe that those are true artists, not some freak shows. All the artists we work with are artists that are emerging and somehow emerged—simply talented artists and digital media is just the way they work.

S: But you seem to have a different language or vocabulary for the components within your model? What’s different about the works in the category “Web”? What’s a “season” (it easily reminds people of TV shows on websites like Netflix)?

DG: A lot of things are about semantics here. It’s trying to find a way to describe what we are doing. You might have noticed that we call everything artists’ video, artists’ sound, artists’ web, because what we see is that artists make the works. It’s not just video art, sounds art or web art—sometimes these are quite old and clumsy terms. The category “Web” is still an amorphous area of different forms of artworks, maybe a website, a video, or GIFs, but it’s enabling us to have different technologies within a section. Right now it’s probably ostensibly things that you could call video in our video section, but they are just made by slightly more emerging artists. With the “seasons”, it is a way of defining what each cycle is. As we were launching, we wanted to give a flavor that Season 1 is the first commissioning cycle. Like on Netflix, you might have a second season, which is a new cycle. What I think of the languages of Netflix is that you go back to Season 1 and Season 2 when you are on Season 10, but are still delighted to look at those seasons. You don’t think of them any less just because they are “older”, and in some cases you realize you have to look at those first.

A snapshot of the “Art” page on the Daata Editions website, where artworks are categorized as “Video”, “Sound” and “Web”.

S: How do you select the artists for each season? How does the collaboration work?

DG: It goes back to what I mentioned as an ecosystem. The artists all have a pretty good aura around them. A few of them recently graduated, like Helen Benigson, Matt Copson, Lina Lapelyte and Charles Richardson. And then there’s others that we have been working with for years and are well known. David Blandy has done a lot of works about gaming and sound cultures. Ed Fornieles and Jon Rafman are both advisors to our project. Leo Gabin, for instance, produce video and film works, but for Daata they have also made sound works for the first time. It’s therefore exciting to commission something that these artists haven’t focused on before. We show them online, but they can be purchased and shown offline. In other words, they are not solely dependent on the online platform. We commission the artists without saying what they should make for us, only that the work should be around 3 minutes or less. The idea is that the works will be fresh, quick and spontaneous. We limit what we do but we never judge the works. There’s no sending back to the artists or saying that we don’t like the works. That’s risky but it’s the way we wanted it to be—trust the artists to deliver. Our business model is a self-sustaining company. The aim is that each cycle is paid for from the previous one, but the artists get paid upfront regardless of sales.

Takeshi Murata, OM Passenger, HD Video, mp4, 0:40 mins ( artwork page on Daata https://daata-editions.com/art/video/takeshi-murata-om-passenger )

S: What about the choice of the website design?

DG: We did something similar with the designer of the website. Studio Scasascia, the company we worked with designed the website of a favorite record company of mine. As I’m comfortable buying music online, I hope to use this model to sell artists’ works as well. My brief to the designers was that we wanted the artists to be the center of the website. We wanted it to be an aesthetically pleasing and also simple platform, doing not more than showing and selling 18 artists’ commissioned works. We commissioned 6 works from each artist, plus one by Jon Rafman, which is free for downloading from the website. Meanwhile all the works can be viewed without registration or payment.

Jon Rafman, Oh the Humanity, HD Video, mp4, 3:00 mins, Unlimited edition.

A certificate for Jon Rafman’s “Oh the Humanity”.

S: Now that the works can be fully accessed on the website, what marks the difference between viewing and owning the works? What do you think drives a collector to purchase something non-physical?

DG: For one artwork, there’s 15 editions for sale. When you purchase one work you can download the high resolution file and own an edition of that work. The price goes up by $100 (in web and sound) or $200 (in video) after each edition sells. The price of a final artwork, for instance in video, can be $5600, which in my view, is probably closest to what the artwork is actually worth. In this way, we want to make it transparent and accessible, so that the works become affordable for many more people. Of course not everyone buys an artwork of $100, but this price is quite cheap for a quality artwork. So we are talking about people who believe in art. We are not trying to convince people who think it’s not worth it, because they might say the same thing about Picasso and Matisse. But still we want those people to be able to watch the works. Unlike Youtube where you find millions of videos and sounds, we are an artist based platform and we show artworks. What drives the collectors is their wish to own artworks, similar to how they come into a gallery or an auction house to buy artworks of other media. I think a collector can do both.

S: How is Daata Editions and your artists doing so far?

DG: We have made some major sales to major art collectors and collections. We will be announcing those in October when we launch the third release. It is in fact magical for us because these are the biggest collectors of this kind of media. It’s also brilliant for the artists because they are now in those big collections. Some of them will truly start their career from this, which could have taken more years for their works to be found or purchased via galleries. Actually, many of the artists on our site don’t have galleries yet. For those who do, several galleries are keen for us to show their artists, because evolving a market for any artist is difficult. So we see what we do as a supportive act. We promote the artists but don’t actually represent them.

Lina Lapelyte, Hunky Bluff ACT2 – Never was a shade, CD Quality sound, wav, 2:57 mins, ( artwork page on Daata https://daata-editions.com/art/sound/lina-lapelyte-hunky-bluff-act2-never-was-a-shade )

S: What’s the sales agreement between Daata Editions and its customers? Do you have something like customer service? What happens if a file is damaged or lost?

DG: If the file on your computer is damaged or lost, you can download again from the website. We won’t make it a problem, since the collectors own the file and their names are on the certificate. If they want to give it to another person and transfer the ownership, they go to the website and change the certificate and then download it in the new owner’s name. Also the collectors can always log in their accounts on our website and view their purchased items online. If a different operating system exists, we will adjust the files to make sure the works play well on it. We want to make the whole process simple and friendly instead of making a prison contract that you enter into. You buy an artwork, and you can view it on whatever platform, and within reason, you can show it in your home and in your office. Of course if you want to show it publicly, the artist owns the intellectual property, and we need to go back to the artist. But we operate based on the trust in the buyer. The art world I operate in is all about good will and credibility, and this world should believe in itself. We don’t want to make the buying of digital art a problem before it’s happened.

S: Did you set a goal of any sort?

DG: We are working with artists, whose natural language is digital and online. We set up this platform with the goal that in the near future people are happy to buy, play and show artworks digitally on their devices. If a gallery can’t sell digital artworks or any time-based media easily, then the artists become compelled to make paintings, sculptures, installations that are easier to commodify. I see digital media equally to the traditional mediums such as painting and sculpture. I hope they can be seen equally by all. With most artists touching upon digital media in some way, we anticipate there will be a real market and audiences will have the confidence to engage with it.

S: Are you confident about creating a “virtual” market for artists and collectors?

DG: Yes. I do think it’s a natural development. It’s not a contrived market because I do believe we are getting to the point where real artists are making really good artworks with digital means. Technology, as their tools, are being used brilliantly. It’s no longer a romanticism of digital media. But again we don’t want to be the only platform to show artists working with digital media. Currently we can’t do more than 18 artists in a season because obviously we, as a small team, are limited. I’d love to think galleries can look at what we are doing and similar companies like ours can copy us, because I believe galleries are the ultimate and best placed curator of the artists they represent. However, many galleries can’t think of doing it, because perhaps they can’t do it properly or still lack the desire. That’s why I think we have to evolve different market places. Not all artworks are sold in the same way. There should be different sales or rental models, but what bonds them, makes them co-exist and move forward together are dialogues and communications. Hopefully we are a powerful voice and I do believe that we are empowering the market place by making people believe they can buy what we have commissioned from the artists and create various commercial relationships.

1 See ANNY SHAW, “Collectors join forces to co-commission digital art”, THE ART NEWSPAPER, 18 June 2015, http://theartnewspaper.com/reports/156860/

Daata Editions 3rd Artwork Released on 12 Oct

In Artprojx, Charles Richardson, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Frieze, Frieze Art Fair, Jon Rafman, Salon 94, Sound, Takeshi Murata, Video, Web on 28/09/2015 at 2:00 pm
Takeshi Murata, Plant Whisperer (2015). Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions.

Takeshi Murata, Plant Whisperer (2015). Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions.

Daata Editions, the online platform for the sale of commissioned artist video, sound and web editions, is pleased to announce the third artwork release for Season One. The artworks will be available at http://daata-editions.com from 5pm on Monday 12 October with a special release event at the Daata Editions Lounge at the Zabludowicz Collection. The release coincides with the Jon Rafman and Charles Richardson shows opening at the Zabludowicz Collection.

Daata Editions was developed to enable audiences to view contemporary artists who are working in digital mediums, showing artworks made for, and therefore best viewable on, laptops, iPads, iPhones, screens and even cinemas. This new and innovative way to collect art is designed specifically to be a native platform to a new generation of artists who work with moving image and sound, and to empower artists, audiences and the marketplace in an area of artistic practice that remains underrepresented within traditional art market models.

For Season One, Daata Editions has commissioned 18 artists to create six new artworks each in editions of 20, with 15 going on sale to the public via the website and five others automatically put aside for philanthropy. All artworks last no longer than approximately three minutes and are made in ways that challenge traditional modes of exhibition, reception and, therefore, of collecting as well. Daata Editions artists commissioned for the Season One are: Ilit Azoulay, Helen Benigson, David Blandy, Matt Copson, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Daniel Keller & Martti Kalliala, Lina Lapelyte, Rachel Maclean, Florian Meisenberg, Takeshi Murata, Hannah Perry, Jon Rafman, Charles Richardson, Amalia Ulman, Stephen Vitiello, Chloe Wise.

David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions, said: “It is important that while we continue to find new artists whose work pushes the definition of contemporary art, we also develop formats through which such work can be best accessed and understood. We also need far more competition from similar platforms that commission, show and sell digitally made art online to empower artists, audiences and the marketplace alike.”

In addition to the commissions available for purchase, all subscribers to the platform receive a free Jon Rafman artwork, made specifically for Daata Editions.

To watch the trailer for the third artwork release, please click here.

Event

Daata Editions 3rd Artwork Release Launch
Monday 12 October, 5 – 6pm
Daata Editions Lounge @ the Zabludowicz Collection
176 Prince of Wales Road
London NW5 3PT
RSVP to hannah@suttonpr.com

Artworks in Daata Editions 3rd Release (Season One)

Video
Ed Fornieles – Climbing
Leo Gabin – Ain’t Gon Do It
Daniel Keller & Martti Kalliala – Exitscape 3
Florian Meisenberg – hihihihihihihihih
Takeshi Murata – Plant Whisperer
Amalia Ulman – White Flag Emoji 3

Sound
Ilit Azoulay – Object #3
Matt Copson – Booty Call
Leo Gabin – Aliens
Lina Lapelyte – Hunky Bluff Act 3
Hannah Perry – sick off smoke
Stephen Vitiello – In The Woods (after Tana French)

Web
Helen Benigson – Cluck, Cluck, Cluck 3
David Blandy – Mist
Rachel Maclean – Let It Go Part 3
Hannah Perry – the worse you feel the better I look
Charles Richardson – Extra
Chloe Wise – should i add an emoji

(All works are 2015)

Press Information

Hannah Gompertz, SUTTON
+44 (0)207 813 3577 | hannah@suttonpr.com

Making it rain ! Selected works from Daata Editions Season One at TIFF

In Daata, Daata Editions, film festival, Takeshi Murata, The Drake Hotel, TIFF, Toronto International Film Festival on 10/09/2015 at 3:44 pm
Takeshi Murata OM Making it rain

Takeshi Murata, Making It Rain (2015). Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions

Toronto International Film Festival: Wavelengths

September 10-19, 2015

Making it rain !

Selected works from Daata Editions Season One

Featuring selected Daata Editions artists: Jon Rafman, David Blandy, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Daniel Keller & Martti Kalliala, Rachel Maclean, Florian Meisenberg, Takeshi Murata, Hannah Perry, Charles Richardson, Chloe Wise. 

Selected by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions and Curator of Film, Art Basel in Miami Beach.

For TIFF’s 2015 offsite program, the Drake is thrilled to collaborate with Daata Editions to present a program of digital works by 12 international artists. This program is designed to invite viewers to consider the moving image outside of formal exhibition spaces and bring new media more directly into our environments.

The program will be screened at the Queen West Hotel on screens throughout and nightly on the façade of hotel’s downtown location, Drake One Fifty. In addition, the entire programme will be screened with sound in the Hotel’s private dining room, on September 12 and 13, noon-5pm offering a more cinematic experience.

Making it rain ! 

List of Daata Editions artworks

Jon Rafman – Oh the humanity
David Blandy – Ice
Ed Fornieles – Bathing
Leo Gabin – Girlhood
Daniel Keller and Martti Kalliala – Exitscape 1
Rachel Maclean – Let It Go – Part 1
Florian Meisenberg – the_tacit_one
Takeshi Murata – OM Making It Rain
Hannah Perry – aahhhhhh
Charles Richardson – Carramesh
Chloe Wise – she’s so talented
David Blandy – Ruin
Ed Fornieles – Falling
Leo Gabin – Write your name
Daniel Keller and Martti Kalliala – Exitscape 2
Rachel Maclean – Let It Go – Part 2
Florian Meisenberg – somewhere_sideways
Takeshi Murata – OM Passenger
Hannah Perry – Useless
Charles Richardson – 27th March
Chloe Wise – do you really think he fingered her

Location:

Drake Hotel

1150 Queen Street West

Toronto, ON M6J 1J3

&

Drake One Fifty

150 York St

Toronto, ON M5H 3S5

More information:

daata-editions.com

thedrakehotel.ca

tiff.net

Daata Editions and Monegraph Grow Online Marketplace for Digital Art – Art in America

In Art in America, Art Market, artists, Daata Editions, Digital, Internet, Monegraph, Moving Image, Online, Sound, Video, Web on 18/08/2015 at 10:47 am
Ed Fornieles Falling 2015

Ed Fornieles, Falling 2015, Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions

Daata Editions and Monegraph Grow Online Marketplace for Digital Art

Art in America

by Whitney Mallett

The art market continues to grow, with spring auction house sales totalling a record-breaking $2.6 billion this year. But video and new media works make up a fraction of the works sold, and are only represented in 10 percent of collections. Although more artists than ever are working digitally, many of them find it difficult to monetize their work and have expanded their practices to include more easily commodifiable objects. The problem of selling new media works, of course, is not new. Since video art emerged in the 1960s and ‘70s, new media artists have struggled to earn a living comparable to their colleagues working in more traditional forms like painting and sculpture. Our recent shift to digital, though, rather than being another source of the problem, just might lead us toward a solution.

Two companies are working to develop new systems for selling intangible work and getting artists paid. David Gryn, a curator and consultant based in London, launched Daata Editions in May with support from collector Anita Zabludowicz. The digital platform is devoted to selling select video, Web-based and sound works commissioned from artists with gallery representation. Artist and professor Kevin McCoy’s platform Monegraph, which launches in September, is more democratic. The service offers an online marketplace as well as a licensing system based on similar encryption technology used by Bitcoin and other so-called “cryptocurrencies.”

Over the last two decades Gryn has worked primarily with artists who create moving image works. During a phone interview, the Daata Editions director noted two paradoxical trends: the art market is dominated by fairs and auction houses that don’t cater to video and digital work, while digital media is ubiquitous in everyday life. “It dawns on me every time I go to an art fair that galleries don’t know how to sell moving image work and people don’t know how to look at it and buy it,” he said. In conceiving Daata Editions, he imagined an online platform as a more intuitive way for people to consume and buy these works.

The first season of commissions for Daata includes seven videos, six sound pieces and six Web-based works. Contributing video artists include Jon Rafman and Ed Fornieles (who are represented in the Zabludowicz Collection), as well as Amalia Ulman and Takeshi Murata. Chloe Wise and Charles Richardson are among the six artists tapped for Web-based commissions; Stephen Vitiello and Matt Copson are featured sound artists. All the works can be accessed on the site, with a small watermark in the corner as the only distinguishing feature from the editioned version for purchase. (For the sound pieces, there’s an equivalent aural watermark woven into the piece—a few seconds of beeps introduced about 20 seconds into the work.) Buying an edition also means the collector can download the file. Gryn envisions Daata Editions as an accessible way to “empower the market” to take ownership of digital work.

Selling reproducible digital works has been difficult in a market geared toward unique objects like paintings and sculptures. Monegraph is a platform geared primarily to establishing usage rights for digital works. “We make a distinction between the bits and the rights,” explained Monegraph co-founder and CEO McCoy when I spoke with him in New York, “and that’s a fundamental belief we’ve built the platform around.” The bits, meaning the digital information encoded in a file, can be pirated or copied. “But instead of worrying about those bits, let’s instead have clear articulable ownership and rights around the usage of media,” McCoy said.

Monegraph verifies ownership of creative works through the same system that cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin register transactions: unique alphanumeric strings of characters on a secure database that is both decentralized and a matter of public record. “All our contracts are living on the block chain in the public ledger,” said McCoy. Artists can create contracts on Monegraph’s platform without specialized technical knowledge, simply by registering the work under their name. They can also register art for sale as a unique work, a limited edition or unlimited stock media. The registrant controls whether the buyer has resale rights and whether the work can be remixed. Selecting “no remix” doesn’t change the ease at which someone can take a screen shot of the work and use it as source material, but it does specify usage so that contesting the remix no longer falls into a hazy legal zone.

While Monegraph gives artists a platform to sell work and control of the terms of sale, Daata Editions defines the contract that it offers to artists. Daata pays the artists upfront for the commissioned works and grants them a 15 percent royalty on sales, as well as two editions of the work they produce. Although the works could potentially be pirated and reproduced, Daata controls rightful ownership through a simple certificate system and maintains the value of the work through an editioning model. Each work is produced in an edition of 15, the price rising with each subsequent edition that sells. The going rate for the first edition is $100 or $200; the highest valued video works on the site are being sold for $5,600. “It can possibly give people that thrill they get at an auction,” Gryn says of the pricing system, “where they want to get the work before [the price gets] too high.”

Monegraph and Daata Editions also take different approaches to authorization. McCoy has opted for a digital verification system at Monegraph, whereas Gryn doesn’t think digital art needs a structure any more secure than those already used for other forms of art. Intellectual property attorney Andrew Gerber suggests that these different verification systems would both hold up in a court of law. “If there’s an instance of copyright infringement and the potential plaintiff had handwritten documents in crayon that clearly established ownership of the infringed work it would be, from a legal perspective, identical to a block chain that established ownership.” He added, however, that the current copyright system is antiquated, and the registry is hard to find information in. “People are excited that this new technology presents an easier way to find out who owns what.”

There’s some precedent for these contracts and systems in the world of new media art. McCoy, who creates interactive films, videos, installations and performances with his partner Jennifer McCoy, has sold and distributed work via the gallery system, as well as through independent distribution services that were established during the rise of video art in the ‘60s and ‘70s. Nonprofit archives like Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and Video Data Bank (VDB) facilitate both the sale and rentals of works in their collections. Most artists receive royalties in the form of screening fees when the works are shown at universities or museums. McCoy noted that this nonprofit model emerged alongside alternative and artist-run spaces like Anthology Film Archives, Artists Space and Printed Matter.

Video Databank, EAI and LUX [a moving image nonprofit in England] have been doing it brilliantly,” Gryn said, “but their model is ultimately an academic rental model, which doesn’t often cater toward the audience which has now emerged through the art market.” He added, “I think you need to be addressing as many voices as possible in our art ecosystem.” The global class of collectors that Gryn is addressing through Daata, able to flit from continent to continent to attend the ever-increasing number of art fairs, is a relatively new audience.

Monegraph exemplifies another recent change in the art ecosystem: the flirtation between the creative and tech industries, which has the potential to draw alternative funding sources funding like venture capital money into the arts. The business developed from McCoy and New York-based tech entrepreneur Anil Dash’s presentation at the New Museum-affiliated Internet-based arts nonprofit Rhizome’s “Seven on Seven” conference in 2014. Because of its pairing of artists with technology, Rhizome is able to lure Silicon Valley participants for the conference. Today Monegraph is a member of New Inc., the New Museum’s co-working space designed to breed these sort of start-up hybrids.

Like Kickstarter, Etsy or Vimeo, Monegraph’s model is structured around a demographic of prosumers, a demographic of creators that blur the distinction between media producers and consumers. It will take a percentage of the sales made through its platform (though one can register authorship through Monegraph and sell through other means) and will launch a subscription model similar to Vimeo’s, including features for professionals and businesses like higher usage rates. “We’ve seen the democratization of the means of production,” explains McCoy, noting that nearly everyone is a content producer in the online ecosystem. “I think the role of the artist or of the creator is more broadly distributed now.”

Monegraph aims to have a variety of works registered on its platform, from fine art to stock photos. McCoy plans to sell his own work on Monegraph and wants other artists from the gallery world to use the service, though he also relishes in the unpredictability of exactly who will relate to it. “For a long time I’ve made systems of various kinds—data-based systems, imaging systems, discourse systems—and I see this as the same thing,” said McCoy. “It’s going to be a platform people are going to use and use in strange ways. I’m just trying to get to that point.”

Both McCoy and Gryn seem to agree that a healthy online art economy depends on decentralization. McCoy says that the anti-proprietary attitude ushered in by the sharing, remixing and creative-commons era of Web 2.0 “paved the way for big aggregators to come and suck in all the content. Now we have Facebook and a couple of other centralized platforms.”

Gryn, for his part, laments the comparisons of Daata Editions to Artsy (a site that promotes and sells art in all mediums) or Sedition (a sales site for digital art). He says it suggests a mentality that people have come to expect digital monopolies, but he insists there needs to be competition between platforms for successful monetization. With Daata Editions, “it’s not trying to be dominant and take over the world. It’s trying to be a business model that can hopefully exist with many others, but there aren’t a plethora of them yet. If there were a plethora of those platforms paying artists to make work, then all of a sudden you’ve got an economy for artists.”

Article Link: http://www.artinamericamagazine.com/news-features/news/daata-editions-and-monegraph-grow-online-marketplace-for-digital-art/

Daata Editions

Monegraph

Art in America

Daata Editions featured in Elephant Magazine – Summer 2015

In Art, Art Basel, artists, Daata Editions, Elephant, Frieze, Magazine, Moving Image, NADA, Post-Internet, Video on 29/06/2015 at 12:00 pm
ed-fornieles-bathing

Ed Fornieles, Bathing (2015). Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions

Daata-Editions

Dates: Ongoing

Daata-Editions launched its online platform for the sale of video, web and sound editions at NADA, Frieze New York, Salon 94 and Soho House this spring. The simple and extremely well designed project allows collectors to easily and confidently download digital art forms that have until now been thought of as difficult to acquire.

“It’s about creating an economy for artists working in these mediums during a curious time of change” says founder David Gryn, who has been working with artists for over twenty years, including curating the film programme at Art Basel Miami Beach. “People think that online is some kind of mythological space where things happen automatically, but that’s not the case. We need to encourage artists to know that these mediums are valued.”

‘Season One’ of Daata-Editions sees 18 artists including Ed Forneiles, Leo Gabin, Chloe Wise, Florian Meisenberg, David Blandy, Hannah Perry and Ilit Azoulay commissioned to produce six works, no longer than three minutes long each, which will be released on the site regularly. The artists are commissioned and paid in full for the works, as well as receiving royalties on the sale of the editions, and are free to experiment entirely on their artworks.

You can view and buy the works at www.daata-editions.com

by Molly Taylor, Elephant Magazine

2015-04-02-Daata-FriezeQuarterPageAd-draft02-2 copy

Taken from the latest print issue of Elephant Magazine

Elephant, Issue 23, Summer 2015 – What is Post Internet Art ?

Pages 19, 29, 135, 136

Elephant and Daata image

The Digital Revolutionaries on the Salon 94 Bowery Video Wall – last few days

In ABMB, artists, Bowery, Daata, Daata Editions, LoveWins, New Museum, New York, NYC, Salon 94, Shiboogi, Video on 27/06/2015 at 11:31 am
Shiboogi

Image still: Shiboogi by Takeshi Murata, 2012

THE DIGITAL REVOLUTIONARIES

THE SHIBOOGI VERSION

With videos by artists

Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Florian Meisenberg, Takeshi Murata, Hannah Perry, Jon Rafman, Amalia Ulman, Chloe Wise

Curated by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions

ends June 30, 2015

Salon 94 is pleased to present The Digital Revolutionaries: The Shiboogi Version on the video wall at 243 Bowery.

David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions, has curated a special selection of videos for screening on the video wall (and viewable online at Salon 94). The Daata Editions screening program celebrates the launch of the new online platform http://daata-editions.com by showing a selection of recent moving image works by artists commissioned to make new works for Daata (now available online). Daata places artists at the center of the project and encourages a marketplace and means for distribution that supports artists working across digital media.

The Digital Revolutionaries is all of us. The digital realm is now our natural language and its evolution is ours. These artists make work that reflect on how we use the internet in personal and clichéd ways. What does it mean to surf and go online in our everyday experience? What are the references, inspirations and new kinds of vocabulary? Many of these works derive from public video sharing sites like Youtube, sourcing and super-cutting the accessible moments that resonate. The generation of Digital Revolutionaries make art with, for, from and about this medium, the internet.

David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions and Curator Film, Art Basel in Miami Beach

PROGRAM / ARTISTS

Ed Fornieles
Aging sucks (small), 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Leo Gabin
Hair Long, 2013
Courtesy: the artist, Peres Projects, Elizabeth Dee

Ed Fornieles
Angele short (small), 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Florian Meisenberg
Gentrified Harddrive (ultra echokinesis), 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Simone Subal, Kate MacGarry, Wentrup Gallery, Mendes Wood DM

Ed Fornieles
Boy, 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Takeshi Murata
Shiboogi, 2012
Courtesy: the artist, Salon 94, Ratio 3

Ed Fornieles
Death, 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Hannah Perry
A Little Thing, 2012
Courtesy: the artist

Ed Fornieles
Girl face (large), 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Jon Rafman
Popova-Lissitzky Office Complex, 2013
Courtesy: the artist, Feuer/Mesler, Seventeen Gallery

Ed Fornieles
Glasses, 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Amalia Ulman
Excellences & Perfections (Instagram Update 17th May 2014), 2014
Courtesy: the artist

Ed Fornieles
Mom help, 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Chloe Wise
Offer Ending Soon (petite), 2015
Courtesy: the artist, Galerie Division

Ed Fornieles
Shadow, 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Contact and location:

Salon 94 243 BOWERY NEW YORK, NY 10002 T: 212 979 0001 http://www.salon94.com

page2image384 Daata-salon94stills-additional-01

http://www.salon94.com/video-wall/the-digital-revolutionaries-the-shiboogi-version

Screen Shots Program Launch at Soho House NY with Daata Editions

In Art Fair, Daata, Daata Editions, Frieze, NADA, New Art Dealers, New York, Soho House, Video Art on 09/05/2015 at 11:04 am

SHNY_SCREEN SHOTS_Invite_May2015_02

Screen Shots is a new monthly video art program at Soho House New York, showcasing moving image work by international contemporary artists.

David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions has selected the inaugural program, The Digital Revolutionaries: The Gentrified Harddrive version. Running from May 11-June 15, it celebrates the launch of http://daata-editions.com by showing works by some of the commissioned artsits.

Participating artists: Helen Benigson, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Florian Meisenberg, Takeshi Murata, Jon Rafman, Amalia Ulman, Chloe Wise

Soho House, 29-35 9th Ave, New York, NY 10014

https://www.sohohouseny.com/

Please Note: The Monday Evening Launch event is Fully Booked via Membership at Soho House

The Digital Revolutionaries – The Shiboogi Version at Salon 94 Bowery Video Wall

In Art Basel, Artprojx, Bowery, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Frieze, NADA, New York, Salon 94, Soho House, Video Art on 02/05/2015 at 9:53 am

Daata-salon94stills-additional-01

THE DIGITAL REVOLUTIONARIES

THE SHIBOOGI VERSION

With videos by artists

Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Florian Meisenberg, Takeshi Murata, Hannah Perry, Jon Rafman, Amalia Ulman, Chloe Wise

Curated by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions

May 1 – June 30, 2015

Salon 94 is pleased to present The Digital Revolutionaries: The Shiboogi Version on the video wall at 243 Bowery.

David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions, has curated a special selection of videos for screening on the video wall (and viewable online at Salon 94). The Daata Editions screening program celebrates the launch of the new online platform http://daata-editions.com by showing a selection of recent moving image works by artists commissioned to make new works for Daata (available to view and buy from May 14). Daata places artists at the center of the project and encourages a marketplace and means for distribution that supports artists working across digital media.

The Digital Revolutionaries is all of us. The digital realm is now our natural language and its evolution is ours. These artists make work that reflect on how we use the internet in personal and clichéd ways. What does it mean to surf and go online in our everyday experience? What are the references, inspirations and new kinds of vocabulary? Many of these works derive from public video sharing sites like Youtube, sourcing and super-cutting the accessible moments that resonate. The generation of Digital Revolutionaries make art with, for, from and about this medium, the internet.

David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions and Curator Film, Art Basel in Miami Beach

PROGRAM / ARTISTS

Ed Fornieles
Aging sucks (small), 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Leo Gabin
Hair Long, 2013
Courtesy: the artist, Peres Projects, Elizabeth Dee

Ed Fornieles
Angele short (small), 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Florian Meisenberg
Gentrified Harddrive (ultra echokinesis), 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Simone Subal, Kate MacGarry, Wentrup Gallery, Mendes Wood DM

Ed Fornieles
Boy, 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Takeshi Murata
Shiboogi, 2012
Courtesy: the artist, Salon 94, Ratio 3

Ed Fornieles
Death, 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Hannah Perry
A Little Thing, 2012
Courtesy: the artist

Ed Fornieles
Girl face (large), 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Jon Rafman
Popova-Lissitzky Office Complex, 2013
Courtesy: the artist, Feuer/Mesler, Seventeen Gallery

Ed Fornieles
Glasses, 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Amalia Ulman
Excellences & Perfections (Instagram Update 17th May 2014), 2014
Courtesy: the artist

Ed Fornieles
Mom help, 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Chloe Wise
Offer Ending Soon (petite), 2015
Courtesy: the artist, Galerie Division

Ed Fornieles
Shadow, 2014
Courtesy: the artist, Carlos/Ishikawa

Daata Editions is launching at NADA New York on May 14, 2015 (until May 17)

SCREEN SHOTS Program launch with Daata Editions at Soho House, New York (May 11 – June 15). Featuring: Helen Benigson, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Florian Meisenberg, Takeshi Murata, Hannah Perry, Jon Rafman, Amalia Ulman, Chloe Wise

Contact and location:

Salon 94 243 BOWERY NEW YORK, NY 10002 T: 212 979 0001 http://www.salon94.com

page2image384

http://www.salon94.com/video-wall/the-digital-revolutionaries-the-shiboogi-version