David Gryn blog

Archive for the ‘Sound’ Category

DAATA EDITIONS on UNTITLED, RADIO at UNTITLED, SAN FRANCISCO

In Art Fair, artists, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Hannah Perry, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, John Skoog, Leo Gabin, radio, Radiooooo.com, Sound, Uncategorized, Untitled on 12/01/2017 at 10:38 am
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Leo Gabin, Break Up, 2015 (courtesy the artists and Daata Editions)

DAATA EDITIONS on UNTITLED, RADIO

UNTITLED, SAN FRANCISCO
Sunday January 15, 2017 at 12 noon (PST)
Artists: Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, Leo Gabin, John Skoog and Hannah Perry.

On Sunday January 15 at 12 noon (PST) on Untitled, Radio, Daata Editions Director, David Gryn will present sound works by artists Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, Leo Gabin, John Skoog and Hannah Perry.

UNTITLED, RADIO – A live broadcast that takes the place of the customary program of conversations and talks, offering a unique roster of interviews, performances, curated playlists, and sound-based works.

UNTITLED, RADIO is organized by Director of Programming and Development, Amanda Schmitt with San Francisco Programming and Development Advisor, Juana Berrio.

UNTITLED, ART is an international, curated art fair founded in 2012 that focuses on curatorial balance and integrity across all disciplines of contemporary art. Untitled, Art innovates the standard fair model by selecting a curatorial team to identify, and curate a selection of galleries, artist-run exhibition spaces, and non-profit institutions and organizations, in dialogue with an architecturally designed venue. Since 2014 the curatorial team has consisted of Christophe Boutin, Omar López-Chahoud and Melanie Scarciglia. The inaugural edition of UNTITLED, SAN FRANCISCO will take place at the historic Pier 70 in the Dogpatch neighborhood, January 13 – 15, 2017.

THE WATTIS INSTITUTE for Contemporary Arts will build a temporary bar on-site at the fair, inspired by the Wattis Bar – an intimate gathering place designed by the artist Oscar Tuazon. The bar will serve as the hub for Untitled, Radio, as a site to host public programs, and a meeting place throughout the course of the fair.

DAATA EDITIONS commissions artist video, sound, poetry and web. This new and innovative way to collect art is designed specifically to be a native platform to a new generation of artists who work with moving image and sound. Limited edition artworks can be viewed and acquired as digital downloads.

Artworks selected from Daata Editions are …

Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen – Bamboo Grove
Leo Gabin – The Heart Wants
Leo Gabin – Awesome
Leo Gabin – Break Up
Leo Gabin – Aliens
John Skoog – iPhone
John Skoog – Marijuana Mars
Hannah Perry – Sick off smoke
Hannah Perry – Keep the peace

These are all available to hear and acquire at http://daata-editions.com

 daata-on-untitled

The Artist as Composer – in Conversations and Salon series: Art Basel in Miami Beach 2016

In Art, Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Basel Miami Beach, Art Salon, Artists Talk, Daata, daataeditions, Miami, Miami Beach, Music, New World Center, New World Symphony, Sound, SoundScape Park, talk, Uncategorized on 16/11/2016 at 5:45 pm
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molly palmer, fountain, 2016

Conversations and Salon: Art Basel’s 2016 program in Miami Beach. Art Basel’s Conversations and Salon series will bring together celebrated artists, galleries, art historians, writers, curators, museum directors and collectors from across the globe, including Alexandre Arrechea, Wafaa Bilal, Francesco Clemente, Mark Dion, Lady Bunny, Julio Le Parc, Glenn Ligon, Tony Matelli, Jill Magid, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Damián Ortega, Bernardo Ortiz, Molly Palmer, Howardena Pindell, HE Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi, Howard Rachofsky and Sun Xun among others.

Sunday, December 4, 2016
2pm to 3pm | Artist Talk | The Artist as Composer
Molly Palmer, Artist, London; Susannah Stark, Artist, London; Kathryn Mikesell, Founder, The Fountainhead Residency and Studios, Miami; Rachel Mason, Artist, Los Angeles. Moderator: William J. Simmons, Lecturer in Art History, City College of New York, New York. With an introduction by David Gryn, Curator of Art Basel’s Film sector and Founder of Daata Editions and Artprojx, London.

The Conversations and Salon talks are programmed by Mari Spirito, Founding Director, Protocinema, Istanbul/New York.

 

info on all the talks art basel press release

notes.

The Art Basel in Miami Beach Film & Sound program in Soundscape Park will be Free to attend on Wednesday, November 30 thru Saturday, December 3. The surround sound program starts at 6pm until 8pm and repeats each of the days, this is a compilation of sound artworks, played nightly during the fair from 6pm until 8pm, featuring artists commissioned to create or reform work into surround sound installations. This year’s artists include: Molly Palmer, Sussanah Stark, Ain Bailey, Zoe Buckman, Jonathan Montague and A.K. Burns.

The Film program starts at 8pm each night with a two hour compilation, repeated daily, of 28 moving image artworks screened under the title ‘Best Dressed Chicken in Town’. Artists include: Ana Mendieta, Anri Sala, Derrick Adams with Ramon Silvera, Samson Young, Kudzanai Chiurai, Edgardo Aragón, Luther Price, Catharina van Eetvelde, Ara Peterson, Matt Copson, Martin Creed, Jillian Mayer, György Kovásznai, Tromarama, Kim Gordon, Li Shurui & Li Daiguo, Adam Shecter, Brian Alfred, Dashiell Manley, Haroon Mirza, Zak Ové, Cabelo, Lena Daly, Nate Boyce, Tomislav Gotovac, Rodney Graham, Keren Cytter.

With a title borrowed from a classic 1970s reggae song by Jamaican dj/singer Doctor Alimantado, this year’s short film program focuses on a selection of international artists who engage with music in a multitude of ways. All the films in this varied and exciting program demonstrate the power of music to attract an audience, keep it engaged, elicit suspense and tug at the heartstrings. Similar to classical symphony works, the order of the films builds up to a crescendo creating an awe-inspiring magic derived from the works in their entirety.

Each night at 10pm there are uniquely featured Film program’s including a Rita Ackermann, Christian Marclay Double Bill on Wednesday, November 30, and a Liliana Porter and Alfredo Jaar Double Bill on the Friday, December 2.

On Thursday, December 1 a feature titled New Parthenon, with works by artists: Ain Bailey & Sonia Boyce, Anna Grenman, Rashid Johnson, Alex Prager, Penny Siopis.

The final screening titled Love Songs is on Saturday, December 3 will include four short films by Polish artist Wilhelm Sasnal.

All the works have a strong relationship with music.

TIME OUT

https://www.timeout.com/miami/things-to-do/art-basel-miami-2016-film

&

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INSIGHTS: THE MUSIC in FILM & SOUND – ART BASEL in MIAMI BEACH
NEW WORLD CENTER

Tuesday, November 29, 11:00 am
New World Center, SunTrust Pavilion
Coffee, tea and light pastries will be served
Free with RSVP/ticket

Featuring David Gryn, Kathryn Mikesell, Molly Palmer and John Kieser

RSVP/Tickets: www.nws.edu/insights

David Gryn, the curator of Art Basel’s Film & Sound programming and Director of Daata Editions in conversation with Kathryn Mikesell, founder of The Fountainhead Residency & Studios, Miami, and Molly Palmer, a London based artist commissioned for the Surround Sound program and will be resident at Fountainhead. Hosted by John Kieser, Executive Vice President and Provost of the New World Symphony.

A conversation around the curation of this years Film and Sound programming for Art Basel in Miami Beach and its relationship to music, the New World Center, collaborations between the various organisations, artists, residencies, curators and future plans and aspirations. There will be a chance to join in the conversations and ask questions.

For more information on the 2016 Art Basel events in SoundScape Park: http://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/art-basel-at-soundscape-park/.

 

Surround Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2016

In A. K. Burns, Ain Bailey, Art Basel in Miami Beach, ArtBasel, artists, Callcoon Fine Arts, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Donald Hayden, Jonathan Montague, MiamiBeach, Molly Palmer, New World Symphony, Sound, SoundScape Park, Surround, Susannah Stark, Uncategorized, Zoe Buckman on 08/11/2016 at 10:31 am
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Image: Film & Sound at Soundscape Park (photo courtesy Art Basel)

The Surround Sound Program 2016

Featuring Artists:
Ain Bailey
Zoe Buckman
A.K. Burns
Jonathan Montague
Molly Palmer
Susannah Stark

Selected by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions and Curator of Film & Sound, Art Basel in Miami Beach

Soundscape Park, New World Symphony Center, Miami Beach 

FREE 6pm-8pm Daily during Art Fair days Weds/Thurs/Fri/Sat.

Soundcloud Compilation Playlist

http://daata-editions.com http://artbasel.com http://www.fountainheadresidency.com/

This compilation of sound artworks will be played nightly during the fair from 6pm until 8pm – when the Film program starts.

In addition to the program of films, this year marks the third edition of Surround Sound, a program through which we have commissioned artists to create or reform work into Surround sound installations. This year’s artists include: Molly Palmer, Sussanah Stark, Ain Bailey, Zoe Buckman, Jonathan Montague and A.K. Burns.

The Soundscape Park experience is unique in the artworld — and a well known location for Miami locals — featuring a huge 7000 sq ft screening wall, with a 160 speaker surround sound system. In the screening area Art Basel provides large beanbag cushions – several people can lounge per cushion. It provides a great calming antidote to the frenetic pace of the Art Fair in the day and the plethoras of other events and parties at night.

NSD/TSD by Ain Bailey

NSD/TSD is a work exploring the natural acoustics of the New World Symphony Centre. This will be achieved by generating audio material from the environments internal soundscape, and composing a multichannel sound work from the resulting audio for presentation on the 160 speaker Surround Sound System in Soundscape Park. The project’s genesis stems from an ongoing research project entitled ‘AGORA’ which takes as a starting point the acoustics of sites such as churches, cinemas and gallery spaces, where people come together to form transitory assemblies.

Ain Bailey is a sound artist, living and working in London, UK. Her current practice involves an exploration of architectural acoustics, live performance, as well as collaborations with performance, visual and sonic artists. Among these is performance/visual artist Jimmy Robert, who commissioned Bailey to create a composition for his 2016 show ‘Desendances du Nu’ at the CAC-Synagogue de Delme, France. Bailey has exhibited and performed both nationally and internationally, and ‘Oh Adelaide’ her collaboration with the artist Sonia Boyce, has shown in London at Tate Britain and the Whitechapel Gallery, and The Kitchen, New York, to name but a few international art spaces. Bailey is also a doctoral scholar at Birkbeck, University of London.

One Round by Zoe Buckman

The audience stand amidst the sound of a speed bag being rhythmically hit in a boxing gym. The sound of the leather hitting the wood: hard and succinct, builds to an almost aggressive quality as it is picked up in surround sound, yet the repetition of this specific sound allows for an almost hypnotic or meditative experience.

The sounds one hears in a boxing gym have a testosterone-heavy quality to them. However during the time Buckman has spent in these spaces, she has drawn parallels between the strength, endurance and confidence needed to survive there, with female-centric experiences such as childbirth.

Zoë Buckman (b.1985, Hackney, East London) is a multi-disciplinary artist working in sculpture, photography, embroidery and installation, exploring themes of feminism, mortality and equality. Buckman’s work has been shown in solo exhibitions including Every Curve at Papillion Art, Los Angeles; Present Life at Garis & Hahn Gallery, New York and group exhibitions internationally including Truth to Power, a group show at the Democratic National Convention, Philadelphia, Making and Unmaking, at Camden Arts Centre, London, curated by Duro Olowu; For Freedoms, at Jack Shainman Gallery, NYC; Game On!, at Children’s Museum of Arts, NYC; To Be Young, Gifted & Black, Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg South Africa.

Leave No Trace (Side A) by A.K. Burns (Callicoon Fine Arts)

“Leave No Trace” is an analog audio project by A.K. Burns that is a limited edition vinyl record with a custom plastic bag, a pair of nitrile gloves and a poem. The recording combines ambient environmental recordings, the artist’s own voice, sounds generated from found materials and an old electric guitar. Leave No Trace, is part of a cycle of related works that use science fiction as a point of departure to rework relationships between bodies, nature, technology, territories and resources. The title refers to wilderness ethics as well as pointing to ways one leaves a mark, is codified and recorded.

A.K. Burns (b. 1975) lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. Burns is a 2016-17 Radcliffe Fellow through the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, where she is developing an ongoing project, Negative Space, a cycle of multi-media installations. The opening episode A Smeary Spot, debuted at Participant Inc, NY in the Fall of 2015. A new iteration will be exhibited at the Portland Institute of Contemporary Art, September 2016. The work was initiated with the generous support of a Creative Capital Foundation Visual Arts Award and additional support for this work is being provided through the Education Department’s Spring 2017 Research & Development Season at the New Museum, where Burns is currently in residence. The residency will culminate with an exhibition opening January 2017.

http://www.akburns.net/projects/leave-no-trace/

Plundaphonic by Jonathan Montague

Ubik Radio Music Festival, Sound Installation, 2016
Using the narrative of the science fiction paradigm, the notion of self is questioned through sampling the audio back catalogue of my past. To then propose a future self of automated sounds in the format of a radio broadcast. Included is one selected track from the Radio show.

Using space as a material with the motion and affects of sound, I investigate the spatial narrative created via the inhabitation of the viewer, and the perception of sound. My background in Architecture informs the way in which work can inhabit a place and the spatial parameters of its context; giving insight into the way in which boundaries and intersections of spatial territory could be manipulated then occupied. Through investigation into the sonic potential properties of space and sound, conditions of an affect laden automated future, are addressed through access to a dialogue positioned in giving agency to dismantling notions of a predefined future. In my work I use my past as a material to sculpt and modulate, to create a future narrative. With reference to a speculative notion of self-identity, I generate work through a process of dis and re-association with the sampling of self.

Sirens by Molly Palmer
 (Supported by Fountainhead Residency)

There are sounds that follow you from place to place. In the cities while you wait for sleep, the sirens are a voice that makes a map – a long hand sketching lines between the buildings. This is a story and a song, but it is also a dream and a drawing. Sometimes a sound takes on a shape and lies down in your skull. An amoebic symbol stretching out from your bed to the edge of the night. The stereo version of this track uses binaural sound and benefits best from listening with headphones. 

Molly Palmer is a London-based artist who works within and between the media of music, installation, choreography and filmmaking. Using handmade props, sets and costumes to produce layered video worlds, she green-screens her protagonists into parallel places, where music, gesture and dialogue form cyclical narratives that explore the strangeness concealed within ordinary things. Palmer graduated from Royal Academy Schools this year, where she won the Gold Medal. Recent exhibitions and screenings include Berwick Film and Media Arts Festival, Berwick-Upon-Tweed, RA Schools Show 2016, Royal Academy, London, Talk So I can See You, curated by Pil & Galia for the Czech Cultural Foundation, London, Premiums, Royal Academy, London, The Fade : touring solo show at CCA, Glasgow, Enclave, London and Torna, Istanbul, and Mono 5, curated by Rafal Zajko at The Courtyard Theatre, Hoxton, Herðubreið Theater Cinema, Seyðisfjörður, Bikini Wax, Mexico City and MUPU, Oaxaca.

The Wheel (featuring Don Hay) by Susannah Stark 

The Wheel, featuring vocals by London-based artist/musician Donald Hayden, is a recording in two parts that run parallel, intersecting across each other and finally together at once and on top of each other in a sculptural experience. Low-fi effects create a sense of echo and disorientation, a technique that was used in dub tracks in the 70s to bring about a metaphoric space of freedom and change, punctuated by layers of disembodied, digitised voices, like those that occur in the contemporary urban environment. This history is revisited to expose and uncover elements of language embedded in our everyday experience. The Wheel is about slowing down, peeling away words on the surface: the language of advertisement, spam, media and public manipulation, telesales and broadcasting, highlighting the flow of things – language – traded in a capitalist marketplace, inviting people to look beyond the constraints of the work and the language that is presented to them.

Susannah Stark is a scottish artist and printmaker, working with multimedia installation and sound, incorporating or involving issues of voice, power and reappropriation. This is part of an ongoing process of exploring how much of the western identity can be constructed from diverse popular sources and how the mouth may be the modulator for such regurgitations and formations. Her work explores the slippages between objects and voices translated from digital experience, to highlight and challenge material hierarchies.

Soundcloud

Art Basel Press Release

Art Basel Facebook

Artlyst News

ABMB Film Trailer

TIME OUT

Join us for a talk at the New World Symphony

http://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/concerts/insights-the-music-in-film-sound-with-david-gryn/

http://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/art-basel-at-soundscape-park/

The Daata Editions Sound Room at Chart Art Fair, Copenhagen 26-28 Aug

In Chart Art Fair, Copenhagen, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, John Skoog, Sofie Alsbo, Sound, Thora Dolven Balke, Uncategorized on 23/08/2016 at 8:49 pm

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Daata Editions presents

The Daata Editions Sound Room at CHART Art Fair, Copenhagen.

The Sound Room will host newly launched works by

Sofie Alsbo, Thora Dolven Balke, John Skoog.

CHART Art Fair
26 – 28 August

Kunsthal Charlottenburg
Copenhagen

Friday 26 August, 4 – 8pm
Saturday 27 August, 12 – 6pm
Sunday 28 August, 12 – 5pm

More info:
chartartfair.com

daata-editions.com

 

The Artists Surround Sound Project – Art Basel in Miami Beach 2015

In Art Basel, Art Fair, artists, Miami, Miami Beach, New World Symphony, Sound on 03/11/2015 at 3:41 pm
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SoundScape Park during Film at Art Basel in Miami Beach curated by David Gryn (from the 2013 screening of Mickalene Thomas, Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman: A Portrait of My Mother). Image: courtesy Art Basel

The Artists Surround Sound Project

Film at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2015

Sofie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker, Camille Norment

Curated and organised by David Gryn of Daata Editions and Artprojx worldwide

SoundScape Park, New World Center, Miami Beach

December 2-5, 2015 at 6pm

FREE

Soundcloud trackshttps://soundcloud.com/david-gryn/sets/the-artists-surround-sound

New World Symphony https://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/art-basel-at-soundscape-park/

Facebook event https://www.facebook.com/events/140052276352255/

Talk at the New World Symphony – http://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/concerts/insights-artists-film-and-sound-with-david-gryn/

Wednesday, December 2: Mariele Neudecker

Thursday, December 3:  Sofie Alsbo

Friday, December 4: Camille Norment

Saturday, December 5: Alice Jacobs

Every evening at 6pm during Art Basel in Miami Beach, prior to the Film program, sound works by Sofie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker and Camille Norment will be presented at 6pm (until 8pm) on the state-of-the art surround sound system with its 160 speakers in SoundScape Park.

Nothing is going to sound quite like this …

Art Basel in Miami Beach – Talks Program

Salon talks panel (full talks program pdf)

Saturday, December 5, 2015, 2pm to 3pm

The Artists Surround Sound Project
Mariele Neudecker, Camille Norment, Sophie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs
Moderator: David Gryn, Curator of Art Basel’s Film sector and Founder of Daata Edition and Artprojx

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Sofie Alsbo, Close Encounter, 2015

Sofie Alsbo

Close Encounter (2015)

Close Encounter (2015) is a surround sound piece made specifically for Miami Soundscape Park as part of Surround Sound Artists Project.

Signals reaching for a wave. Roaming. Vibrations and heartbeats. Clap. A drone that bites its own tail. A circulating loop around the crowd. The body in a mass. Clap. Close Encounter enters the arena with sporadic fragments as the soundscape sway in the contrast of the physicality and transparency of the presence of sound.

Sofie Alsbo (b. 1982, Denmark) received a BA in Fine Art from Central St. Martins UAL and a Postgraduate Diploma from The Royal Academy Schools in London. Working with video, animation and sound a relationship between technology and the human body is explored as the work focuses on the pull between the internal and external space of the body and mind.

credits:

Pete Jones Music

Arge
Sound Designer
Envy Post Production

James
Producer
Envy Post Production

www.sofiealsbo.com

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Alice Jacobs, The Intent I Owe, 2015

Alice Jacobs

The Intent I Owe, 2015

Alter our fear, you frown me,

With her, with her, will feel form.

How dear and fairs, and soul, won’t be.

So kind, giving of being, inhabited here,

She laughed in dear o mourning.

For plans hath loved so grow,

For you, sigh and frown, whore again,

On hold, for hell or high, bitter end,

Alter our fear.

Alter our fear, who, bears flight,

When here, descend our endeavours,

So last, untold and shouts bear down.

Mere time near heart and first once stood,

Don’t lie, the bruise in the family,

In deed, were told fairs and cold.

Oh mother, her again, her screaming!

Oh you, frown hiding by our lost youth,

Alter our fear.

All men here, right, men now,

Dear here, it wont hurt to hold them,

One died, is how this all turned out.

Stay close, and hear the mothers womb,

Her voice still shakes, but I warned her,

The wounds, will hide across her face.

Dear you, only the holy shall save you,

Take care, this fear and thought of you,

Ave Maria!

The Intent I Owe, (2015) is based on Ave Maria by Schubert. Originally sung in German, here the lyrics have been transposed into an English poem. The harmonic sounds focus on religious notations of women, the iconic figure of Madonna and, by contrast, how in reality, men perceive the female as mother and sex object.

Alice Jacobs (b 1992, London) MA Royal Collage of Art (2017). BA (Hons) Central Saint Martins (2015). Uniwersytet Artystyczny w Poznaniu (2014). Jacobs addresses a feminist perspective to create a platform for the female gaze via performance, sound and sculptural media. She is interested in the visual representation of gender interaction as delineated by a patriarchal society.

Credits:

Theo Zeal, Sound Producer, UK

Milly Forrest, Voice, Royal Academy of Music, UK

Rodrigo Canas, Royal Collage of Art, UK

Louis Dowdeswell, Assistant Sound Engineer, UK

http://www.a-vaj.co.uk/

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Mariele Neudecker, Figure of 8 (Rainforest, Ecuador, sound recorded at height: 1.39m, 9.78m, 22.59m, 30.79m and 37.26m), for 5.1 surround, 16 minutes looped, 2015 (courtesy Galerie Barbara Thumm, Berlin, Germany) PHOTO: Laurie Lax

Mariele Neudecker

Figure of 8 (Rainforest, Ecuador, sound recorded at height: 1.39m, 9.78m, 22.59m, 30.79m and 37.26m), for 5.1 surround, 16 minutes looped, 2015 (courtesy Galerie Barbara Thumm, Berlin, Germany)

’Figure of 8’ aims to create a soundscape that is artificially collaged from 3-dimensional sound-recordings that, at the time of capture, observed and co-responded with the circadian rhythm of the place. The sound implies and animates a physical shift through a physical space and a horizontal timeline, a sound experience of ‘a night in the jungle’.  Going beyond the image, Neudecker, at times, works with classical music and ‘sound data’, exploring the pathos and evocative power of ‘audio’ that is rooted in ‘ground truth’, a term used in remote sensing to describe data collected on location. In this particular location: no image, moving or still, can possibly capture what the sound manages to convey. Tiputini Biodiversity Station [Ecuador] where these recordings were taken – for a permanent, commissioned work for the new Cancer Centre at Guy’s Hospital, London, which is due to open late 2016 – is one of the most bio-diverse forests in the world. Its sounds never stop.

Mariele Neudecker [b.1965 Germany] lives and works in Bristol, UK and uses a broad range of media including sculpture, film, photography as well as sound. Her works have been exhibited widely internationally both in group- and solo-exhibitions. Her practice investigates the formation and historical dissemination of cultural constructs around the natural world and notion of a Contemporary Sublime. Neudecker often uses technology’s virtual capabilities in order to reproduce a heightened experience of nature & landscape, thus addressing the subjective and mediated condition of any first hand encounter.

credits:

Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK

Guy’s & St Thomas’ Charity, London, UK

Futurecity, London, UK

Bath Spa University, Bath, UK

Laurie Lax and John Taylor, Bristol and Bath, UK

Jan Meinema, Creative Music Technology @ Bath Spa University, UK

Manus Pitt, BBC Natural History Unit, Bristol, UK

Tiputini Biodiversity Research Station, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador

www.marieleneudecker.co.uk

www.bthumm.de

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Camille Norment, Toll – Dissonant Image
 (Re-mixed and mastered from Toll, 2011 for 5.1 surround), 2015

Camille Norment

Toll – Dissonant Image
(Re-mixed and mastered from Toll, 2011 for 5.1 surround), 2015

Three instruments – the rare glass armonica, the Norwegian Hardanger fiddle, and the electric guitar – each, once banned for fear of the psychological, physical, or social effects they had on the body – come together in a visceral soundscape of resonance and overtone that levels beauty and noise. The title composition was influenced by Arvo Pärt’s “Fratres,” meaning ‘brotherhood,’ and puts the notion of social harmony and dissonance to question through lulling, taunting, and abrasive textures.The enveloping sonic image invokes the instruments’ relationships to notions of magic and the uncanny, hypnosis and trance, and noise as a psychological atmosphere. The powerful sonic worlds they create resonate through a tantalizing union of the instruments’ voices and their paradoxical cultural histories.

The work of artist Camille Norment guides an investigation of socio-cultural phenomena through particular instances and significations of sound and music. The aim is to produce critical artworks that are equally occupied with experiential form, and conceptual narrative.  There is a particular interest in both sonic and socio-cultural tension – parallels of dissonance – and an underlying interest in the physiological effects of sound on the body that may exceed the cultural boundaries of perception.

http://www.norment.net/

David Gryn

Curator Film and Sound at Art Basel in Miami Beach

Director, Daata Editions and Artprojx

http://daata-editions.com

http://artprojx.com

http://artbasel.com

https://davidgryn.wordpress.com

Film at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2015 – Our Hidden Futures

In Art Basel, Art Fair, artists, Artprojx, Chloe Wise, Claire Christerson, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Film, Moving Image, Sound, Video Art on 24/10/2015 at 10:16 am
Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 12.07.14 PM

Chloe Wise & Claire Christerson, Greece, 2015, 3′, courtesy of the artists

Our Hidden Futures

Film: Art Basel announces 2015 program for Miami Beach

Curated by David Gryn, Daata Editions and Artprojx

Film Trailer

– ART BASEL PRESS RELEASE MIAMI BEACH | OCTOBER 23 | 2015

From December 2 through 6, 2015, Art Basel will present a premier program of over 50 films and videos by and about artists selected under the title ‘Our Hidden Futures’. Screened on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, the program is again curated by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions and London’s Artprojx.

First-time Art Basel film curator Marian Masone, Senior Programming Advisor at the Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York has selected the feature-length film ‘Troublemakers – The Story of Land Art’ (2015) by filmmaker James Crump for a special screening at the Colony Theatre on Friday, December 4.

Gryn’s program of film and video works, drawn from the show’s participating galleries, will include work by Ida Applebroog, Anna Barham, Breda Beban, Janet Biggs, Sue de Beer, Rineke Dijkstra, Tracey Emin, Barbara Hammer, Shirazeh Houshiary, Jaki Irvine, Anna K.E. & Florian Meisenberg, Jumana Manna, Howardena Pindell, Cauleen Smith, Catherine Sullivan, and Marnie Weber.

Every evening, in addition to the Film program, sound works by Sofie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker and Camille Norment will be presented on the state-of-the arts surround sound system in SoundScape Park, curated by David Gryn. In conjunction with the outdoor film screenings, over 80 works have been selected to be shown within a designated Film Library at the Art Basel fair, whose Lead Partner is UBS.

Returning for his fifth year with Art Basel, curator David Gryn’s selection of works for Film will explore the history and future path of moving image artworks. Framed under the title ‘Our Hidden Futures’, the lineup will highlight an international selection of emerging and established artists, encompassing a range of moving image works that illustrate the breadth of these various analogue and digital mediums.

On Saturday, December 5 at 2pm, Art Basel’s Salon program will feature ‘The Artists
Surround Sound Project’ a talk between Art Basel film curator David Gryn and the artists
Sophie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker and Camille Norment. Art Basel
entry tickets include admission to the Salon.

For the full list of films featured at Art Basel in Miami Beach in 2015, please visit artbasel.com/miami-beach/film

– GENERAL INFORMATION

Daily (December 2 – 6)

Miami Beach Convention Center Film Library

In conjunction with the outdoor program, over 80 selected works will be presented on six touch-screen monitors within the Film Library at Art Basel’s show during show hours. Access with a show entrance ticket.

Nightly (December 2 – 5)

SoundScape Park Evening Film Program

Outdoor screenings will take place in SoundScape Park on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, a three-minute walk from the Miami Beach Convention Center. Admission to Film at SoundScape Park is free. Visitors are encouraged to bring blankets and lawn chairs.

Every evening from 6pm to the start of the first film screening, sound works by different artists, curated by David Gryn, will be presented in SoundScape Park: Weds, Dec 2: Mariele Neudecker / Thurs, Dec 3:  Sofie Alsbo / Fri, Dec 4: Camille Norment / Sat, Dec 5: Alice Jacobs. Free public access, seating is limited – bring a blanket or lawn chair.

– 2015 FILM PROGRAM

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

6pm | Sound work

Mariele Neudecker, Figure of 8 (Rainforest, Ecuador, sound recorded at height: 1.39m, 9.78m, 22.59m, 30.79m and 37.26m), 2015, Galerie Barbara Thumm

8pm | Short Film program | Fairy Doll

Running time approximately 58’; selected by David Gryn

The 2015 Film program will open with a selection of short works in which artists focus on a single portrait to draw out the nuances of what it means to be human.

Rineke Dijkstra, Marianna (The Fairy Doll), 2014, 19’13”, Marian Goodman Gallery

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle, The Countermand, 2014, 9’48”, Jenkins Johnson Gallery

Carla Chaim, Lua Certa, 2011, 1’03”, Galeria Raquel Arnaud

Anna K.E. & Florian Meisenberg, Late Checkout (Part II), 2015, 9’58”, Simone Subal Gallery

Anna Maria Maiolino, Um Momento, Por Favor, 1999/2004, 4’30”, Hauser & Wirth

Howardena Pindell, Free, White and 21, 1980, 12’15”, Garth Greenan Gallery

9pm | Short Film program | Speak Easy

Running time approximately 78’; selected by David Gryn

‘Speak Easy’ will consider the artistic use of the creative, the audience, and the allure of the arena, the theater and the theatrical to explore the unsaid or unsayable.

Simone Leigh & Liz Magic Laser with Alicia Hall Moran, Breakdown, 2011, 9’46”, Tilton Gallery

Jumana Manna, A Sketch of Manners (Alfred Roch’s Last Masquerade), 2013, 12′, CRG Gallery

JoAnn Verburg, Watching Trisha Brown, 2015, 2’40”, Pace/MacGill Gallery

Melanie Smith with Rafael Ortega, Aztec Stadium. Malleable Deed, 2010, 10’29”, Sicardi Gallery

Marinella Senatore, Speak Easy, 2009, 15′, Peres Projects

Catherine Sullivan, Triangle of Need (Olympian and Doves), 2007, 8’22”, Metro Pictures

Ann-Sofi Sidén in collaboration with Jonathan Bepler, Curtain Callers, 2011, 20′, Galerie Barbara Thumm

Thursday, December 3, 2015

6pm | Sound work

Sofie Alsbo, Close Encounter, 2015, , courtesy of the artist

9pm | Afterward Via Fantasia

Catherine Sullivan with George Lewis and Sean Griffin, Afterword via Fantasia, 2015, 60ʹ, Metro Pictures

Catherine Sullivan’s film, ‘Afterword Via Fantasia’, is conceived within the framework of an opera written by composer George Lewis and co-directed by Sullivan and longtime collaborator Sean Griffin. Sullivan transposes material from Lewis’s libretto into a series of scenes shot on sets for other plays with parallel and divergent social and cultural themes. The opera and film are based on Lewis’s widely-acclaimed book A Power Stronger Than Itself: The AACM (Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians) and American Experimental Music. The AACM has long played a key role in American experimental music, forging new models of black identity and social activism.

10pm | Short Film program | Sea of Silence

Running time approximately 56’; selected by David Gryn

Works within ‘Sea of Silence’ reflect on the poetic silence of the absent and, in so doing, create a louder and much more visceral language.

Marnie Weber, Sea of Silence, 2009, 14’15”, Gavlak Gallery / Simon Lee Gallery

Camille Henrot, Million Dollars Point, 2011, 5’35”, Galerie König / kamel mennour

Shirazeh Houshiary, Dust, 2011-2013, 7’08”, Lehmann Maupin

Cauleen Smith, Crow Requiem, 2015, 11′, Corbett vs. Dempsey

Minnette Vári, Quake, 2007, 6’23”, Goodman Gallery

Tracey Emin, Love Never Wanted Me, 2013, 2’48”, Lehmann Maupin

Nikki S. Lee, Yours, 2015, 8’41”, One and J. Gallery

Friday, December 4

6pm | Sound work

Camille Norment, Toll – Dissonant Image, (Re-mixed and mastered from 2011 version of Toll), 2015, courtesy of the artist

8pm | Short Film program | Duet

Running time approximately 45’; selected by David Gryn

‘Duet’ will present artworks that embody pairs, the split screen, duos and unions, which are found in the style of the film, the artistic process or within the narrative.

Janet Biggs, Duet, 2010, 6’47”, Cristin Tierney Gallery

Zanele Muholi, Ayanda & Nhlanhla Moremi’s Wedding, 2013, 11’50”, Stevenson

Nicola Thomas, S-time, 2015, 3’53”, courtesy of the artist

Talia Chetrit, Parents, 2014, 9’44, Sies + Höke, kaufmann repetto

Nicola Thomas, Julian in two parts, 2015 2’02”, courtesy of the artist

Sue de Beer, The Blue Lenses, 2014, 19’03”, Marianne Boesky Gallery

9pm | Short Film program | Snow Job

Running time approximately 62’; selected by David Gryn

Selected works in ‘Snow Job’ use satire to communicate messages that engage and humor us.

Berna Reale, Cantando na Chuva (Singing in the Rain), 2014, 4’15”, Galeria Nara Roesler

Shana Moulton, MindPlace ThoughtStream, 2014, 11’57”, Galerie Gregor Staiger

Mary Reid Kelley, Camel Toe, 2008, 1’25”, Pilar Corrias

Barbara Hammer, Snow Job: The Media Hysteria of Aids, 1986, 7’44”, KOW

Diana Thater, Male Gyr-Peregrine Falcon (Grim), 2012, 30”, Hauser & Wirth

Chloe Wise & Claire Christerson, Greece, 2015, 3′, courtesy of the artists

Ida Applebroog, It’s No Use Alberto, 1978, 9’36”, Hauser & Wirth

Breda Beban, Jason’s Dream, 1997, 10′, courtesy of the artist’s estate & Kalfayan Galleries

Mary Reid Kelley, Swinburne’s Pasiphae, 2014, 8’58’, Pilar Corrias

Judith Hopf, Lily´s Laptop, 2013, 5’29”, kaufmann repetto

8:30 pm | James Crump, Troublemakers – The Story of Land Art, 2015

Special Film Screening at Colony Theatre, 1040 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach

Running time 72ʹ; selected by Marian Masone

Troublemakers – The Story of Land Art, 2015 unearths the history of land art in the tumultuous late 1960s and early 1970s. Focused on a cadre of renegade New York artists that sought to transcend the limitations of painting and sculpture by producing earthworks on a monumental scale in the desolate desert spaces of the American southwest, the film includes rare footage and interviews with artists such as Robert Smithson (Spiral Jetty), Walter De Maria (The Lightning Field) and Michael Heizer (Double Negative). The screening is followed by a panel discussion between the movie’s Director James Crump and Art Basel Film co-curator Marian Masone.

Saturday, December 5, 2015

6pm | Sound work

Alice JacobsThe Intent I Owe, 2015, courtesy of the artist

8pm | Short Film program | Vanishing Point 

Running time approximately 58’; selected by David Gryn

‘Vanishing Point’ will feature a selection of artworks which employ kinetic and choreographed movement to investigate the factory, machines, and the futility of war, as well as the demise of manufacturing and its consequences.

Breda Beban, Let’s call it love, 2000, 7’30’’, artist’s estate, Kalfayan Galleries

María Fernanda Cardoso, On the Origins of Art: Maratus Volans, Male and Female, Artists, 2015, 3’13”, Casas Riegner

Janet Biggs, Vanishing Point, 2009, 10’32”, Cristin Tierney Gallery

Fritzia Irizar, Sin título (requiem JMAF), 2015, 4’19”, Arredondo \ Arozarena

Suzanne Harris, The Wheels / Flying Machine, 1973, 5’47”, Rhona Hoffman Gallery

Anna Barham, The squid that hid, 2015, 5’05”, Galerie Nordenhake

Guan Xiao, Hidden Track, 2015, 4’51”, Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler

Susanne M. Winterling, Immersion Vertex (Prototyp Diadem), 2’22”, 2014, Jessica Silverman Gallery

Pia Camil, No A Trio A, 2013, 7’31”, OMR

Cornelia Parker, War Machine, 2015, 9’25”, courtesy of the artist and Frith Street Gallery

9pm | Bikini Carwash

Running time approximately 52’; selected by David Gryn

The seven works in this program will explore the great outdoors, capturing urban and rural encounters.

Liz Cohen, Bikini Carwash, 2002, 5’58”, Salon 94

Marnie Weber, Songs Hurt Me, 1994, 2′, Gavlak Gallery / Simon Lee Gallery

Jaki Irvine, Se Compra: Sin é, 2014, 17’37”, Kerlin Gallery

Micol Assaël, Overstrain, 2012, 3′, ZERO…

Kristin Oppenheim, Ultramarine, 2015, 7’43”, in collaboration with Don Maclean, 303 Gallery

Cauleen Smith, H-E-L-L-O, 2014, 11′, Corbett vs. Dempsey

Milena Bonilla, Ceremony for a Homogeneous Landscape, 2009, 2’34”, mor charpentier

RELATED LINKS

New World Symphony https://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/art-basel-at-soundscape-park/

Artlyst http://www.artlyst.com/articles/art-basel-announces-2015-film-programme-for-miami-beach-fair

ARTnews http://www.artnews.com/2015/10/23/art-basel-miami-beach-2015-announces-film-program/

Artlyst on Talks program http://www.artlyst.com/articles/artists-and-art-professionals-lead-talks-programme-at-art-basel-miami-2015

Buro on Nikki S. Lee http://www.buro247.sg/culture/news/art-basel-2015-program-for-miami-beach.html

– NOTES TO EDITORS

About the Curators

David Gryn

David Gryn is the founder and director of Daata Editions, a new online platform commissioning artists video, sound and web editioned artworks and director of London’s Artprojx, screening, curating, promoting and lecturing on artists’ moving image and other art projects, working with leading contemporary artists, art galleries, museums, art fairs, art schools and film festivals worldwide.

Marian Masone

Marian Masone is a film curator, lecturer and writer based in New York. For over 20 years Masone has worked at The Film Society of Lincoln Center, America’s pre-eminent film organization. She sits on the selection committees for two of The Film Society’s most prestigious festivals: ‘The New York Film Festival’ and ‘New Directors/New Films’, a co-production with the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Masone has been a guest lecturer and curator for leading institutions such as Parsons School of Design in New York and Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid. Her writings on film and media have appeared in many leading newspapers and magazines.

About Art Basel

Art Basel stages the world’s premier art shows for Modern and contemporary works, sited in Basel, Miami Beach and Hong Kong. Defined by its host city and region, each show is unique, which is reflected in its participating galleries, artworks presented, and the content of parallel programming produced in collaboration with local institutions for each edition. In addition to ambitious stands featuring leading galleries from around the world, each show’s exhibition sectors spotlight the latest developments in the visual arts, offering visitors new ideas, new inspiration and new contacts in the art world.

Partners

UBS, global Lead Partner of Art Basel, has supported the organization for more than 20 years. As Art Basel’s global network has expanded, so too has UBS’s commitment and lead partnership, which includes all three shows in Basel, Miami Beach and Hong Kong. In addition to its support of Art Basel, UBS has a long and substantial record of engagement in contemporary art: as a holder of one of the world’s most distinguished corporate art collections, as an active partner in global contemporary art projects such as the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, and as a source of information and insights through the UBS Art Competence Center, UBS Arts Forum and its new contemporary art news-focused app, ‘Planet Art’.

Associate Partners Davidoff, the prestigious Swiss cigar brand, Audemars Piguet, the independent high-end watch manufacturer, and NetJets, the world leader in private aviation, support Art Basel across its three shows. Art Basel’s Media Partners are The Financial Times and the Miami Herald, and the VIP car service at the show is by BMW. Long-standing partner AXA ART, the international art insurance specialist, provides VIP guided tours at all shows. For further information on Art Basel’s partners, please visit artbasel.com/partners.

Important Dates for Media

Private View
Wednesday, December 2, 2015, 11am to 8pm (by invitation only)

Vernissage
Thursday, December 3, 2015, 11am to 3pm (by invitation only)

Public Days
Thursday, December 3, 2015, 3pm to 8pm
Friday, December 4, 2015, 12noon to 8pm
Saturday, December 5, 2015, 12noon to 8pm
Sunday, December 6, 2015, 12noon to 6pm

Upcoming Art Basel shows
Hong Kong, March 24 – 26, 2016
Basel, June 16 – 19, 2016

Press accreditation
Online registration for press accreditation is now open and will close on November 13, 2015. Please visit artbasel.com/accreditation.

Media information online

Media information and images can be downloaded directly from artbasel.com/press.

For the latest updates on Art Basel, visit artbasel.com, find us on Facebook at facebook.com/artbasel
or follow @artbasel on Instagram, Google+, Twitter, Weibo and Wechat.

Press Contacts

Art Basel, Dorothee Dines

Tel. +41 58 206 27 06, press@artbasel.com

PR Representatives for North and South America and the Middle East

Fitz & Co., Katrina Weber Ashour

Tel. +1 212 627 1653, katrina@fitzandco.com

PR Representatives for Florida

Garber & Goodman, Robert Goodman

Tel. +1 305 674 12 92, FLrepresentative@artbasel.com

PR Representatives for Europe

Sutton, Sarah Norton

Tel. +44 20 7183 3577, sarah@suttonpr.com

PR Representatives for Asia

Sutton, Erica Siu

Tel. +852 2528 0792, erica@suttonprasia.com

Loreta Lamargese text on Daata Editions

In Art, Art Basel, Art Fair, Chloe Wise, Daata, Digital, Frieze, Gryn, Hammer, NADA, Online, Rafman, Sound, Stoschek, Video, Zabludowicz on 19/10/2015 at 10:54 am
Chloe Wise, should I add an emoji, 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Chloe Wise, should I add an emoji, 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Loreta Lamargese on Daata Editions

Daata Editions offers a novel platform to solve a longstanding concern: how to commodify, collect, and distribute intangible and already-networked digital artwork. Probing this question reveals a nested paradox: while we’ve become increasingly reliant upon and enthralled by the digital, artworks that employ new media are thought of as being positioned outside the art market. It is becoming more and more difficult to disentangle ourselves from the digital web and artists – like all those included in the three artwork releases from Daata Editions Season One – are using its medial language to engage with their surroundings. At the same time, it is inane to think that we don’t rely heavily on the market – one that has thus far been thought to absorb only singular and static objects – and that the market isn’t a chief harbinger controlling which artworks and artists receive visibility and clout. And yet, many artists who reject a tradition of trading solely in tangible and discrete art objects, who use digitality as both a site that needs mining and as a material to be manipulated, are visible and powerful contenders in the current contemporary art arena.

What makes Daata Editions particularly significant at our present moment is that it fuses the seeming discord between the market and digital material, organizing artists’ video, sound, and web-based work and having that work available online as editions. In fact, Daata makes clear that these two apparently dissonant entities depend on similar structures, relying on a rapid and seamless transition of information; both are, after all, networked and global. The artists presented in Daata Editions are producing works that operate beyond the sanctified walls of galleries and are experimenting with the fungibility of concepts that fit diverse media and operate on these diverse platforms simultaneously. Similarly, while Daata is primarily stationed online, it does not limit itself to the borderless web, involving additional presentations at art fairs such as a recent collaboration with NADA New York.

Now with its third artwork release, it is safe to say the initial hypothesis that launched the platform is true: that when given an intuitive mode to consume and sell digital artwork – when given the opportunity to purchase new media on indigenous soil- collectors would take ownership. Editions by artists such as Amalia Ulman, Chloe Wise, Ed Fornieles, Jon Rafman, and Leo Gabin made available through Daata Editions are now housed in preeminent international collections including the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, The Zabludowicz Collection, London, and The Julia Stoschek Collection in Dusseldorf. And while private collectors and institutions alike fold moving images and sound works into their collections, artists continue to expand the limits of contemporary art practices, renegotiating our reliance on any particular medium or site.

While I’m hesitant to stress the intrinsically utopic qualities of digital art, its malleability with place and material affords it distance from hermeneutic singularity or ontological fixity. The dynamic chain of reformatting that these digital works undergo lends them to active and multifarious meanings and concepts. For example, Chloe Wise’s series created for Daata Editions, Do You Really Think He Fingered Her?, sees the artist subverting the notion of determined and legible identification. In this collection of videos, we find a friend and collaborator of the artist, Robyn Fox, reciting overheard phrases and the Twitter feeds of Art Basel Miami Beach attendees and friends of the artist. Because Fox is costumed in Wise’s clothes and because Wise often uses her own image in her artwork, we are compelled to read Fox as Wise, collapsing barriers of individualization normally fixed to bodies. And why shouldn’t we? If the video itself, as well as the material from social media that Fox recites, proliferates on multiple channels and in different formats at overlapping intervals, then why should identities and meaning be fixed and contained rather than performed and adaptable?

Since its emergence, artists working with video have struggled to monetize their practice while making hefty contributions to the history of art, changing our modes of perceiving and altering our relationship to objects and images. The current generation of young artists working in new media, including those presented in Daata Editions, is widening the net of possibilities under which image creation and circulation can exist. They are entering the conversation at a vital moment, one in which new economic platforms attempt to keep up with them, finding original means to sell and distribute migrant and non-discrete objects. Daata Editions is an early contributor to this new economy, which not only considers but also focuses and exists within the digital realm. Now entering its third artwork release, Daata Editions has tested these murky waters, shedding light on the possibilities of nurturing and distributing artwork that gains dynamism through circulation – through the very media it takes from.

Loreta Lamargese is a curator and researcher based in Montreal, Canada and works at Galerie Division

Galerie Division http://www.galeriedivision.com/montreal/

Daata Editions http://daata-editions.com

Daata Editions feature in the International New York Times

In Art Basel, artists, Artprojx, Collection, Collector, Digital, Frieze, Hammer Museum, New York Times, NY Times, Sound, Video, Zabludowicz on 15/10/2015 at 6:10 am

International New York Times, The Art of Collecting, 14 October 2015, p.2 copy

International Arts – The Art of Collecting

Website Gives Stage to New-Media Artists 

By Ginanne Brownell Mitic

International New York Times

This is what a hit looks like in the age of digital art. 

A web video piece called “she’s so talented,” by the Canadian born, New York-based artist Chloe Wise, sold three copies within a day of being posted in May on Daata Editions, a digital art marketplace. 

The video, 1 minute 3 seconds and set in Boca Raton, Fla., features a gender-bending character in a variety of poses: drinking Red Bull in a pink velour zip-up jacket on the beach, sitting on a sofa in a high-rise condo, doing dance moves while dressed in a floral midriff top. The soundtrack includes conversational snippets overheard by the artist at last year’s Art Basel in Miami Beach, including “She’s so talented, she’s a real artist,” and “Listen, if you are on the wait list, that means you are in the liminal zone between being no one and actually being someone.” 

“Miami is a place of excess, of vacation and gluttony, but also the art market, with lots of consumerism going on,” said Ms. Wise, who graduated from art school in Montreal in 2013. “It is a really interesting place to overhear things.” 

And, apparently, to get on board with a new way to sell art. Miami is also where Ms. Wise first met David Gryn, a London-based curator who, along with the British collector and philanthropist Anita Zabludowicz, co-created Daata Editions. The website, which debuted during this year’s Frieze Art Fair in New York, combines the growing online art sales scene with the mushrooming market value of new media art. 

Ms. Wise was one of 18 new-media artists invited to be part of the inaugural group to show on the website. The group includes Jon Rafman, Takeshi Murata, Hannah Perry, Ilit Azoulay and Stephen Vitiello

“I have learned to say no to a lot in the art world, as you sense ‘I do not trust this person,”’ said Mr. Vitiello, a Virginia-based sound and visual artist who created sound works for Daata with names like “Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand.” 

“But you try and say yes to those that instinctively feel interesting, and I thought, ‘Why not give this a shot?”’ 

The idea behind Daata is simple. Once a year, 18 video, sound and digital artists will be commissioned to do six pieces of three minutes or less, 15 editions of each piece. The works are available to be purchased and downloaded from the site. 

Daata has a sliding price scale. Sound, web and digital works start at $100 and increase by edition to a top price of $2,800; for video, the starting price is $200, increasing by increments to a top price of $5,600. The price difference, Mr. Gryn said, is linked to the perceived higher market value of video. Daata keeps the revenue and pays each artist a 15 percent royalty on each sale. 

The website got an institutional boost in mid-October with the announcement that two museums had become benefactors. The Julia Stoschek Collection in Düsseldorf, Germany, has purchased the full set of new works, and the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles has accepted a full edition as a gift. The Hammer’s chief curator, Connie Butler, said in a statement that the pieces would “extend the museum’s history of collecting and displaying new media work.” 

Seed funding for the site came from Ms. Zabludowicz, who remains an adviser. The site is staffed by Mr. Gryn and a producer. Their intention is to break even by 2017. 

The first release took place during the Frieze Art Fair in New York, followed in June by a release during LOOP in Barcelona, Spain. After Frieze London, there will be three more releases during Season One, which will extend into early 2016. 

Mr. Gryn, who curates the outdoor film screenings at Art Basel in Miami Beach, said the idea for Daata grew out of his and Ms. Zabludowicz’s observations that collectors were hesitating to buy new media art and gallerists were struggling with how to show it. That, in turn, led to gallerists’ hesitating to bring new media works to art fairs because they tended not to sell well during such high-stakes, high-profile events. 

“We are all so very used to buying music and film online without having to own physical items we have purchased,” Ms. Zabludowicz wrote in an email. “The art mediums are not very different. There are natural similarities in these immaterial art forms. We are making it very simple to show and collect the works that have been commissioned.” 

The British artist Hannah Perry, who was one of the inaugural 18, acknowledged that the concept of collecting video art was difficult for some people to get their heads around. 

“Once you buy something, how do you display it or how do you share it?” she said. “I had a collector say to me once, ‘Do I put a monitor on the wall during a dinner party? Do I keep the sound down? How do I put the sound in?”’ 

When Ms. Perry sells a video work, she includes in the box not only with the certificate of authenticity but also a small silkscreen print related to the piece that the owner can display. 

The perception that video or sound art is difficult to grasp is something that Mr. Gryn hopes will change with Daata. 

“We are not a gallery — we are not art advisers,” he said. “What we are is a commissioning platform that works with artists who work in those mediums and who promote their art form and nurture awareness. My idea is that you make a self-sustaining business that commissions the next round of artists’ works.” 

By the beginning of September, all the inaugural artists had sold several editions of their works, and there were over 500 downloads of a free Jon Rafman video. By Mr. Gryn’s standards, “that is fantastic,” he wrote in an email, because it means the work is being seen and bought. 

Jessica Witkin, the director of the New York gallery Salon 94, which specializes in new media, drew a parallel with how collectors eventually warmed to photographic art, accepting the idea that more than one edition could be available. 

“I think it is really important what they are doing, supporting artists from the inside,” she said. Ms. Wise agreed, saying that if Daata had not commissioned her Florida videos for the platform, they would not have been made. 

“Basically,” she said, “they are pushing the cycle further and allowing digital to really be appreciated and have acceptability, viewership and be funded.” 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/14/arts/international/website-gives-stage-to-new-media-artists.html?mwrsm=Facebook&_r=0

http://daata-editions.com

Collecting on the Cloud, a digital exchange with David Gryn of Daata by Sylvia Wu, SCREEN

In Art, Art Basel, Daata Editions, Digital, Frieze, SCREEN, Sound, Video, Web, Zabludowicz on 10/10/2015 at 7:55 pm

photo: David Gryn by Jane Bustin

Sylvia Wu’s conversation with David Gryn, director of Daata Editions, On New Models of Selling Digital Art, is now live on SCREEN, a New York-based bilingual platform aiming to redefine media art.

http://www.onscreentoday.com/conversation/art-collecting-in-the-air

With the fall coming up, the relatively quiet holiday season will burst into a kaleidoscope of exhibitions and events. Alongside the physical world, several online sales platforms are also making their voices heard. Daata Editions, created by Art Basel’s Curator of Film, David Gryn, and collector Anita Zabludowicz, is among the most active. Launched in May this year, Daata Editions has made some great sales of its artist commissioned video, sound and web art editions, and perhaps more importantly, it has established a fresh model for selling and buying digital art. On its website, Daata Editions has currently two releases from “Season 1” of artist commissioned works including a collaboration between Martti Kalliala and Daniel Keller, and videos by Takeshi Murata. To figure out more about Daata’s language and concepts, SCREEN was in conversation with David Gryn, who previously said “We need to believe that, in the same way we easily buy music and films online via the likes of iTunes or Amazon, we can buy art via digital files and not have to [physically] possess an object to give a work its validation”1

SCREEN: We know that you curate Art Basel’s film sector where you can observe the market for digital art. But how exactly did the initial idea of creating Daata Editions come to you?

David Gryn: I worked with Art Basel for five years, and before that with various major other art fairs. It was obvious that galleries really don’t think about bringing films, videos, sound and other digital media to art fairs because they haven’t found a way to sell them. It dawned to me that something needs to be done about this, not just by one person but by many. I’ve never been a big believer in the market place per se, but I do believe that you need to have a market place where artists who make good digital artworks can be supported.

So our model of creating Daata Editions is the idea to start commissioning artists, paying them and giving them royalties, marketing the process and what they create, and I came together with these thoughts with collector and philanthropist Anita Zabludowicz, whom I’ve known for a long time. We came from different spectrums of the art world, me working with the art directly and not involved in the market place, while Anita collecting art passionately but also supporting artists and students. She believes in the ecosystem of the art world like I do, and the evolving concept of Daata was something we mutually agreed with.

S: What differs Daata Editions from other online sales platforms?

DG: We are not trying to be different. What we are building is our own bespoke, boutique model. I’m not looking at this being reinventing the wheel, but that we’ve created Daata Editions to present artists who make artworks with digital media, video, web, sound works. It works for that medium as well as we can possibly do within a finite model. Where it may differ from others is that we are very restricted to what we are focused on doing—we are commissioning, any one time, currently 18 artists per “season”. We pay the artists upfront to make the works, which is quite unusual in the art world. They also receive a royalty, which is also quite unusual.

A snapshot of the “Artists” page on the Daata Editions website. The background picture is a frame from Leo Gabin’s “Write Your Name”.

I hope that there are many models, and we are one of many. My view is that we’ll do it very well and hopefully other people will also do well. Just like you need many good galleries in an art fair, and you need many of them in a neighborhood to make it an art center that people might travel to visit. One good thing doesn’t form a market place, but often dominance. What often happens with digital business in the art world is that there’s a desire to be dominant because of the idea of monopoly. You could be the next big thing, the next Facebook or the next Twitter. We are not trying to be that. We are trying to put artists at the center of what we are doing, representing mediums that are actually very much commonplace amongst artists. Really commonplace. It’s almost ridiculous that most artists use digital media even if they are painters, to some degree to research or to communicate. But somehow the art market hasn’t found a way to reflect that yet. And galleries really find it difficult to find a business model around those works and how to find the commodified market place. We are working with art forms that are still finding their feet in that area but we are also working with them because we believe that those are true artists, not some freak shows. All the artists we work with are artists that are emerging and somehow emerged—simply talented artists and digital media is just the way they work.

S: But you seem to have a different language or vocabulary for the components within your model? What’s different about the works in the category “Web”? What’s a “season” (it easily reminds people of TV shows on websites like Netflix)?

DG: A lot of things are about semantics here. It’s trying to find a way to describe what we are doing. You might have noticed that we call everything artists’ video, artists’ sound, artists’ web, because what we see is that artists make the works. It’s not just video art, sounds art or web art—sometimes these are quite old and clumsy terms. The category “Web” is still an amorphous area of different forms of artworks, maybe a website, a video, or GIFs, but it’s enabling us to have different technologies within a section. Right now it’s probably ostensibly things that you could call video in our video section, but they are just made by slightly more emerging artists. With the “seasons”, it is a way of defining what each cycle is. As we were launching, we wanted to give a flavor that Season 1 is the first commissioning cycle. Like on Netflix, you might have a second season, which is a new cycle. What I think of the languages of Netflix is that you go back to Season 1 and Season 2 when you are on Season 10, but are still delighted to look at those seasons. You don’t think of them any less just because they are “older”, and in some cases you realize you have to look at those first.

A snapshot of the “Art” page on the Daata Editions website, where artworks are categorized as “Video”, “Sound” and “Web”.

S: How do you select the artists for each season? How does the collaboration work?

DG: It goes back to what I mentioned as an ecosystem. The artists all have a pretty good aura around them. A few of them recently graduated, like Helen Benigson, Matt Copson, Lina Lapelyte and Charles Richardson. And then there’s others that we have been working with for years and are well known. David Blandy has done a lot of works about gaming and sound cultures. Ed Fornieles and Jon Rafman are both advisors to our project. Leo Gabin, for instance, produce video and film works, but for Daata they have also made sound works for the first time. It’s therefore exciting to commission something that these artists haven’t focused on before. We show them online, but they can be purchased and shown offline. In other words, they are not solely dependent on the online platform. We commission the artists without saying what they should make for us, only that the work should be around 3 minutes or less. The idea is that the works will be fresh, quick and spontaneous. We limit what we do but we never judge the works. There’s no sending back to the artists or saying that we don’t like the works. That’s risky but it’s the way we wanted it to be—trust the artists to deliver. Our business model is a self-sustaining company. The aim is that each cycle is paid for from the previous one, but the artists get paid upfront regardless of sales.

Takeshi Murata, OM Passenger, HD Video, mp4, 0:40 mins ( artwork page on Daata https://daata-editions.com/art/video/takeshi-murata-om-passenger )

S: What about the choice of the website design?

DG: We did something similar with the designer of the website. Studio Scasascia, the company we worked with designed the website of a favorite record company of mine. As I’m comfortable buying music online, I hope to use this model to sell artists’ works as well. My brief to the designers was that we wanted the artists to be the center of the website. We wanted it to be an aesthetically pleasing and also simple platform, doing not more than showing and selling 18 artists’ commissioned works. We commissioned 6 works from each artist, plus one by Jon Rafman, which is free for downloading from the website. Meanwhile all the works can be viewed without registration or payment.

Jon Rafman, Oh the Humanity, HD Video, mp4, 3:00 mins, Unlimited edition.

A certificate for Jon Rafman’s “Oh the Humanity”.

S: Now that the works can be fully accessed on the website, what marks the difference between viewing and owning the works? What do you think drives a collector to purchase something non-physical?

DG: For one artwork, there’s 15 editions for sale. When you purchase one work you can download the high resolution file and own an edition of that work. The price goes up by $100 (in web and sound) or $200 (in video) after each edition sells. The price of a final artwork, for instance in video, can be $5600, which in my view, is probably closest to what the artwork is actually worth. In this way, we want to make it transparent and accessible, so that the works become affordable for many more people. Of course not everyone buys an artwork of $100, but this price is quite cheap for a quality artwork. So we are talking about people who believe in art. We are not trying to convince people who think it’s not worth it, because they might say the same thing about Picasso and Matisse. But still we want those people to be able to watch the works. Unlike Youtube where you find millions of videos and sounds, we are an artist based platform and we show artworks. What drives the collectors is their wish to own artworks, similar to how they come into a gallery or an auction house to buy artworks of other media. I think a collector can do both.

S: How is Daata Editions and your artists doing so far?

DG: We have made some major sales to major art collectors and collections. We will be announcing those in October when we launch the third release. It is in fact magical for us because these are the biggest collectors of this kind of media. It’s also brilliant for the artists because they are now in those big collections. Some of them will truly start their career from this, which could have taken more years for their works to be found or purchased via galleries. Actually, many of the artists on our site don’t have galleries yet. For those who do, several galleries are keen for us to show their artists, because evolving a market for any artist is difficult. So we see what we do as a supportive act. We promote the artists but don’t actually represent them.

Lina Lapelyte, Hunky Bluff ACT2 – Never was a shade, CD Quality sound, wav, 2:57 mins, ( artwork page on Daata https://daata-editions.com/art/sound/lina-lapelyte-hunky-bluff-act2-never-was-a-shade )

S: What’s the sales agreement between Daata Editions and its customers? Do you have something like customer service? What happens if a file is damaged or lost?

DG: If the file on your computer is damaged or lost, you can download again from the website. We won’t make it a problem, since the collectors own the file and their names are on the certificate. If they want to give it to another person and transfer the ownership, they go to the website and change the certificate and then download it in the new owner’s name. Also the collectors can always log in their accounts on our website and view their purchased items online. If a different operating system exists, we will adjust the files to make sure the works play well on it. We want to make the whole process simple and friendly instead of making a prison contract that you enter into. You buy an artwork, and you can view it on whatever platform, and within reason, you can show it in your home and in your office. Of course if you want to show it publicly, the artist owns the intellectual property, and we need to go back to the artist. But we operate based on the trust in the buyer. The art world I operate in is all about good will and credibility, and this world should believe in itself. We don’t want to make the buying of digital art a problem before it’s happened.

S: Did you set a goal of any sort?

DG: We are working with artists, whose natural language is digital and online. We set up this platform with the goal that in the near future people are happy to buy, play and show artworks digitally on their devices. If a gallery can’t sell digital artworks or any time-based media easily, then the artists become compelled to make paintings, sculptures, installations that are easier to commodify. I see digital media equally to the traditional mediums such as painting and sculpture. I hope they can be seen equally by all. With most artists touching upon digital media in some way, we anticipate there will be a real market and audiences will have the confidence to engage with it.

S: Are you confident about creating a “virtual” market for artists and collectors?

DG: Yes. I do think it’s a natural development. It’s not a contrived market because I do believe we are getting to the point where real artists are making really good artworks with digital means. Technology, as their tools, are being used brilliantly. It’s no longer a romanticism of digital media. But again we don’t want to be the only platform to show artists working with digital media. Currently we can’t do more than 18 artists in a season because obviously we, as a small team, are limited. I’d love to think galleries can look at what we are doing and similar companies like ours can copy us, because I believe galleries are the ultimate and best placed curator of the artists they represent. However, many galleries can’t think of doing it, because perhaps they can’t do it properly or still lack the desire. That’s why I think we have to evolve different market places. Not all artworks are sold in the same way. There should be different sales or rental models, but what bonds them, makes them co-exist and move forward together are dialogues and communications. Hopefully we are a powerful voice and I do believe that we are empowering the market place by making people believe they can buy what we have commissioned from the artists and create various commercial relationships.

1 See ANNY SHAW, “Collectors join forces to co-commission digital art”, THE ART NEWSPAPER, 18 June 2015, http://theartnewspaper.com/reports/156860/

Daata Editions 3rd Artwork Released on 12 Oct

In Artprojx, Charles Richardson, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Frieze, Frieze Art Fair, Jon Rafman, Salon 94, Sound, Takeshi Murata, Video, Web on 28/09/2015 at 2:00 pm
Takeshi Murata, Plant Whisperer (2015). Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions.

Takeshi Murata, Plant Whisperer (2015). Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions.

Daata Editions, the online platform for the sale of commissioned artist video, sound and web editions, is pleased to announce the third artwork release for Season One. The artworks will be available at http://daata-editions.com from 5pm on Monday 12 October with a special release event at the Daata Editions Lounge at the Zabludowicz Collection. The release coincides with the Jon Rafman and Charles Richardson shows opening at the Zabludowicz Collection.

Daata Editions was developed to enable audiences to view contemporary artists who are working in digital mediums, showing artworks made for, and therefore best viewable on, laptops, iPads, iPhones, screens and even cinemas. This new and innovative way to collect art is designed specifically to be a native platform to a new generation of artists who work with moving image and sound, and to empower artists, audiences and the marketplace in an area of artistic practice that remains underrepresented within traditional art market models.

For Season One, Daata Editions has commissioned 18 artists to create six new artworks each in editions of 20, with 15 going on sale to the public via the website and five others automatically put aside for philanthropy. All artworks last no longer than approximately three minutes and are made in ways that challenge traditional modes of exhibition, reception and, therefore, of collecting as well. Daata Editions artists commissioned for the Season One are: Ilit Azoulay, Helen Benigson, David Blandy, Matt Copson, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Daniel Keller & Martti Kalliala, Lina Lapelyte, Rachel Maclean, Florian Meisenberg, Takeshi Murata, Hannah Perry, Jon Rafman, Charles Richardson, Amalia Ulman, Stephen Vitiello, Chloe Wise.

David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions, said: “It is important that while we continue to find new artists whose work pushes the definition of contemporary art, we also develop formats through which such work can be best accessed and understood. We also need far more competition from similar platforms that commission, show and sell digitally made art online to empower artists, audiences and the marketplace alike.”

In addition to the commissions available for purchase, all subscribers to the platform receive a free Jon Rafman artwork, made specifically for Daata Editions.

To watch the trailer for the third artwork release, please click here.

Event

Daata Editions 3rd Artwork Release Launch
Monday 12 October, 5 – 6pm
Daata Editions Lounge @ the Zabludowicz Collection
176 Prince of Wales Road
London NW5 3PT
RSVP to hannah@suttonpr.com

Artworks in Daata Editions 3rd Release (Season One)

Video
Ed Fornieles – Climbing
Leo Gabin – Ain’t Gon Do It
Daniel Keller & Martti Kalliala – Exitscape 3
Florian Meisenberg – hihihihihihihihih
Takeshi Murata – Plant Whisperer
Amalia Ulman – White Flag Emoji 3

Sound
Ilit Azoulay – Object #3
Matt Copson – Booty Call
Leo Gabin – Aliens
Lina Lapelyte – Hunky Bluff Act 3
Hannah Perry – sick off smoke
Stephen Vitiello – In The Woods (after Tana French)

Web
Helen Benigson – Cluck, Cluck, Cluck 3
David Blandy – Mist
Rachel Maclean – Let It Go Part 3
Hannah Perry – the worse you feel the better I look
Charles Richardson – Extra
Chloe Wise – should i add an emoji

(All works are 2015)

Press Information

Hannah Gompertz, SUTTON
+44 (0)207 813 3577 | hannah@suttonpr.com