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Daata Editions on Artspace

In Artist, Artspace, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Digital, Online, Uncategorized, Video on 31/01/2017 at 12:25 pm

 

Daata Editions now available to purchase on Artspace

https://www.artspace.com/partn…

Artists selected:  Larry Achiampong, Casey Jane Ellison, Tracey Emin, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Scott Lyman, Takeshi Murata, Tameka Norris, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Jacolby Satterwhite, Saya Woolfalk, Zadie Xa.

Daata Editions commissions artists video, sound, poetry and web. Artworks on the website are available to view and acquire as digital downloads in a limited edition.

Daata Playlist:

Larry Achiampong, 1. The Beginning (19 Degrees), 2016

Casey Jane Ellison, Do You Seem Wonderful Casey Automated Private Test (DYSWCAPT) 1, 2016

Tracey Emin, You Must Have Hope, 2016

Ed Fornieles, Electric, 2016

Leo Gabin, Break Up, 2015

Scott Lyman, Pink Empire, 2016

Takeshi Murata, OM Making It Rain, 2015

Tameka Norris, immature tameka, 2016

Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Pink Rooms, 2016

Jacolby Satterwhite, En Plein Air Abstraction #4, 2016

Saya Woolfalk, Colour Mixing Machine 6, 2016

Zadie Xa, Deep Space Mathematics // The Transfer of Knowledge 1, 2016

 

Image: Casey Jane Ellison, Do You Seem Wonderful Casey Automated Private Test (DYSWCAPT) 1, 2016

Loreta Lamargese text on Daata Editions

In Art, Art Basel, Art Fair, Chloe Wise, Daata, Digital, Frieze, Gryn, Hammer, NADA, Online, Rafman, Sound, Stoschek, Video, Zabludowicz on 19/10/2015 at 10:54 am
Chloe Wise, should I add an emoji, 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Chloe Wise, should I add an emoji, 2015 (courtesy the artist and Daata Editions)

Loreta Lamargese on Daata Editions

Daata Editions offers a novel platform to solve a longstanding concern: how to commodify, collect, and distribute intangible and already-networked digital artwork. Probing this question reveals a nested paradox: while we’ve become increasingly reliant upon and enthralled by the digital, artworks that employ new media are thought of as being positioned outside the art market. It is becoming more and more difficult to disentangle ourselves from the digital web and artists – like all those included in the three artwork releases from Daata Editions Season One – are using its medial language to engage with their surroundings. At the same time, it is inane to think that we don’t rely heavily on the market – one that has thus far been thought to absorb only singular and static objects – and that the market isn’t a chief harbinger controlling which artworks and artists receive visibility and clout. And yet, many artists who reject a tradition of trading solely in tangible and discrete art objects, who use digitality as both a site that needs mining and as a material to be manipulated, are visible and powerful contenders in the current contemporary art arena.

What makes Daata Editions particularly significant at our present moment is that it fuses the seeming discord between the market and digital material, organizing artists’ video, sound, and web-based work and having that work available online as editions. In fact, Daata makes clear that these two apparently dissonant entities depend on similar structures, relying on a rapid and seamless transition of information; both are, after all, networked and global. The artists presented in Daata Editions are producing works that operate beyond the sanctified walls of galleries and are experimenting with the fungibility of concepts that fit diverse media and operate on these diverse platforms simultaneously. Similarly, while Daata is primarily stationed online, it does not limit itself to the borderless web, involving additional presentations at art fairs such as a recent collaboration with NADA New York.

Now with its third artwork release, it is safe to say the initial hypothesis that launched the platform is true: that when given an intuitive mode to consume and sell digital artwork – when given the opportunity to purchase new media on indigenous soil- collectors would take ownership. Editions by artists such as Amalia Ulman, Chloe Wise, Ed Fornieles, Jon Rafman, and Leo Gabin made available through Daata Editions are now housed in preeminent international collections including the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, The Zabludowicz Collection, London, and The Julia Stoschek Collection in Dusseldorf. And while private collectors and institutions alike fold moving images and sound works into their collections, artists continue to expand the limits of contemporary art practices, renegotiating our reliance on any particular medium or site.

While I’m hesitant to stress the intrinsically utopic qualities of digital art, its malleability with place and material affords it distance from hermeneutic singularity or ontological fixity. The dynamic chain of reformatting that these digital works undergo lends them to active and multifarious meanings and concepts. For example, Chloe Wise’s series created for Daata Editions, Do You Really Think He Fingered Her?, sees the artist subverting the notion of determined and legible identification. In this collection of videos, we find a friend and collaborator of the artist, Robyn Fox, reciting overheard phrases and the Twitter feeds of Art Basel Miami Beach attendees and friends of the artist. Because Fox is costumed in Wise’s clothes and because Wise often uses her own image in her artwork, we are compelled to read Fox as Wise, collapsing barriers of individualization normally fixed to bodies. And why shouldn’t we? If the video itself, as well as the material from social media that Fox recites, proliferates on multiple channels and in different formats at overlapping intervals, then why should identities and meaning be fixed and contained rather than performed and adaptable?

Since its emergence, artists working with video have struggled to monetize their practice while making hefty contributions to the history of art, changing our modes of perceiving and altering our relationship to objects and images. The current generation of young artists working in new media, including those presented in Daata Editions, is widening the net of possibilities under which image creation and circulation can exist. They are entering the conversation at a vital moment, one in which new economic platforms attempt to keep up with them, finding original means to sell and distribute migrant and non-discrete objects. Daata Editions is an early contributor to this new economy, which not only considers but also focuses and exists within the digital realm. Now entering its third artwork release, Daata Editions has tested these murky waters, shedding light on the possibilities of nurturing and distributing artwork that gains dynamism through circulation – through the very media it takes from.

Loreta Lamargese is a curator and researcher based in Montreal, Canada and works at Galerie Division

Galerie Division http://www.galeriedivision.com/montreal/

Daata Editions http://daata-editions.com

Daata Editions and Monegraph Grow Online Marketplace for Digital Art – Art in America

In Art in America, Art Market, artists, Daata Editions, Digital, Internet, Monegraph, Moving Image, Online, Sound, Video, Web on 18/08/2015 at 10:47 am
Ed Fornieles Falling 2015

Ed Fornieles, Falling 2015, Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions

Daata Editions and Monegraph Grow Online Marketplace for Digital Art

Art in America

by Whitney Mallett

The art market continues to grow, with spring auction house sales totalling a record-breaking $2.6 billion this year. But video and new media works make up a fraction of the works sold, and are only represented in 10 percent of collections. Although more artists than ever are working digitally, many of them find it difficult to monetize their work and have expanded their practices to include more easily commodifiable objects. The problem of selling new media works, of course, is not new. Since video art emerged in the 1960s and ‘70s, new media artists have struggled to earn a living comparable to their colleagues working in more traditional forms like painting and sculpture. Our recent shift to digital, though, rather than being another source of the problem, just might lead us toward a solution.

Two companies are working to develop new systems for selling intangible work and getting artists paid. David Gryn, a curator and consultant based in London, launched Daata Editions in May with support from collector Anita Zabludowicz. The digital platform is devoted to selling select video, Web-based and sound works commissioned from artists with gallery representation. Artist and professor Kevin McCoy’s platform Monegraph, which launches in September, is more democratic. The service offers an online marketplace as well as a licensing system based on similar encryption technology used by Bitcoin and other so-called “cryptocurrencies.”

Over the last two decades Gryn has worked primarily with artists who create moving image works. During a phone interview, the Daata Editions director noted two paradoxical trends: the art market is dominated by fairs and auction houses that don’t cater to video and digital work, while digital media is ubiquitous in everyday life. “It dawns on me every time I go to an art fair that galleries don’t know how to sell moving image work and people don’t know how to look at it and buy it,” he said. In conceiving Daata Editions, he imagined an online platform as a more intuitive way for people to consume and buy these works.

The first season of commissions for Daata includes seven videos, six sound pieces and six Web-based works. Contributing video artists include Jon Rafman and Ed Fornieles (who are represented in the Zabludowicz Collection), as well as Amalia Ulman and Takeshi Murata. Chloe Wise and Charles Richardson are among the six artists tapped for Web-based commissions; Stephen Vitiello and Matt Copson are featured sound artists. All the works can be accessed on the site, with a small watermark in the corner as the only distinguishing feature from the editioned version for purchase. (For the sound pieces, there’s an equivalent aural watermark woven into the piece—a few seconds of beeps introduced about 20 seconds into the work.) Buying an edition also means the collector can download the file. Gryn envisions Daata Editions as an accessible way to “empower the market” to take ownership of digital work.

Selling reproducible digital works has been difficult in a market geared toward unique objects like paintings and sculptures. Monegraph is a platform geared primarily to establishing usage rights for digital works. “We make a distinction between the bits and the rights,” explained Monegraph co-founder and CEO McCoy when I spoke with him in New York, “and that’s a fundamental belief we’ve built the platform around.” The bits, meaning the digital information encoded in a file, can be pirated or copied. “But instead of worrying about those bits, let’s instead have clear articulable ownership and rights around the usage of media,” McCoy said.

Monegraph verifies ownership of creative works through the same system that cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin register transactions: unique alphanumeric strings of characters on a secure database that is both decentralized and a matter of public record. “All our contracts are living on the block chain in the public ledger,” said McCoy. Artists can create contracts on Monegraph’s platform without specialized technical knowledge, simply by registering the work under their name. They can also register art for sale as a unique work, a limited edition or unlimited stock media. The registrant controls whether the buyer has resale rights and whether the work can be remixed. Selecting “no remix” doesn’t change the ease at which someone can take a screen shot of the work and use it as source material, but it does specify usage so that contesting the remix no longer falls into a hazy legal zone.

While Monegraph gives artists a platform to sell work and control of the terms of sale, Daata Editions defines the contract that it offers to artists. Daata pays the artists upfront for the commissioned works and grants them a 15 percent royalty on sales, as well as two editions of the work they produce. Although the works could potentially be pirated and reproduced, Daata controls rightful ownership through a simple certificate system and maintains the value of the work through an editioning model. Each work is produced in an edition of 15, the price rising with each subsequent edition that sells. The going rate for the first edition is $100 or $200; the highest valued video works on the site are being sold for $5,600. “It can possibly give people that thrill they get at an auction,” Gryn says of the pricing system, “where they want to get the work before [the price gets] too high.”

Monegraph and Daata Editions also take different approaches to authorization. McCoy has opted for a digital verification system at Monegraph, whereas Gryn doesn’t think digital art needs a structure any more secure than those already used for other forms of art. Intellectual property attorney Andrew Gerber suggests that these different verification systems would both hold up in a court of law. “If there’s an instance of copyright infringement and the potential plaintiff had handwritten documents in crayon that clearly established ownership of the infringed work it would be, from a legal perspective, identical to a block chain that established ownership.” He added, however, that the current copyright system is antiquated, and the registry is hard to find information in. “People are excited that this new technology presents an easier way to find out who owns what.”

There’s some precedent for these contracts and systems in the world of new media art. McCoy, who creates interactive films, videos, installations and performances with his partner Jennifer McCoy, has sold and distributed work via the gallery system, as well as through independent distribution services that were established during the rise of video art in the ‘60s and ‘70s. Nonprofit archives like Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and Video Data Bank (VDB) facilitate both the sale and rentals of works in their collections. Most artists receive royalties in the form of screening fees when the works are shown at universities or museums. McCoy noted that this nonprofit model emerged alongside alternative and artist-run spaces like Anthology Film Archives, Artists Space and Printed Matter.

Video Databank, EAI and LUX [a moving image nonprofit in England] have been doing it brilliantly,” Gryn said, “but their model is ultimately an academic rental model, which doesn’t often cater toward the audience which has now emerged through the art market.” He added, “I think you need to be addressing as many voices as possible in our art ecosystem.” The global class of collectors that Gryn is addressing through Daata, able to flit from continent to continent to attend the ever-increasing number of art fairs, is a relatively new audience.

Monegraph exemplifies another recent change in the art ecosystem: the flirtation between the creative and tech industries, which has the potential to draw alternative funding sources funding like venture capital money into the arts. The business developed from McCoy and New York-based tech entrepreneur Anil Dash’s presentation at the New Museum-affiliated Internet-based arts nonprofit Rhizome’s “Seven on Seven” conference in 2014. Because of its pairing of artists with technology, Rhizome is able to lure Silicon Valley participants for the conference. Today Monegraph is a member of New Inc., the New Museum’s co-working space designed to breed these sort of start-up hybrids.

Like Kickstarter, Etsy or Vimeo, Monegraph’s model is structured around a demographic of prosumers, a demographic of creators that blur the distinction between media producers and consumers. It will take a percentage of the sales made through its platform (though one can register authorship through Monegraph and sell through other means) and will launch a subscription model similar to Vimeo’s, including features for professionals and businesses like higher usage rates. “We’ve seen the democratization of the means of production,” explains McCoy, noting that nearly everyone is a content producer in the online ecosystem. “I think the role of the artist or of the creator is more broadly distributed now.”

Monegraph aims to have a variety of works registered on its platform, from fine art to stock photos. McCoy plans to sell his own work on Monegraph and wants other artists from the gallery world to use the service, though he also relishes in the unpredictability of exactly who will relate to it. “For a long time I’ve made systems of various kinds—data-based systems, imaging systems, discourse systems—and I see this as the same thing,” said McCoy. “It’s going to be a platform people are going to use and use in strange ways. I’m just trying to get to that point.”

Both McCoy and Gryn seem to agree that a healthy online art economy depends on decentralization. McCoy says that the anti-proprietary attitude ushered in by the sharing, remixing and creative-commons era of Web 2.0 “paved the way for big aggregators to come and suck in all the content. Now we have Facebook and a couple of other centralized platforms.”

Gryn, for his part, laments the comparisons of Daata Editions to Artsy (a site that promotes and sells art in all mediums) or Sedition (a sales site for digital art). He says it suggests a mentality that people have come to expect digital monopolies, but he insists there needs to be competition between platforms for successful monetization. With Daata Editions, “it’s not trying to be dominant and take over the world. It’s trying to be a business model that can hopefully exist with many others, but there aren’t a plethora of them yet. If there were a plethora of those platforms paying artists to make work, then all of a sudden you’ve got an economy for artists.”

Article Link: http://www.artinamericamagazine.com/news-features/news/daata-editions-and-monegraph-grow-online-marketplace-for-digital-art/

Daata Editions

Monegraph

Art in America