David Gryn blog

Archive for the ‘Moving Image’ Category

Film at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2015 – Our Hidden Futures

In Art Basel, Art Fair, artists, Artprojx, Chloe Wise, Claire Christerson, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Film, Moving Image, Sound, Video Art on 24/10/2015 at 10:16 am
Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 12.07.14 PM

Chloe Wise & Claire Christerson, Greece, 2015, 3′, courtesy of the artists

Our Hidden Futures

Film: Art Basel announces 2015 program for Miami Beach

Curated by David Gryn, Daata Editions and Artprojx

Film Trailer

– ART BASEL PRESS RELEASE MIAMI BEACH | OCTOBER 23 | 2015

From December 2 through 6, 2015, Art Basel will present a premier program of over 50 films and videos by and about artists selected under the title ‘Our Hidden Futures’. Screened on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, the program is again curated by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions and London’s Artprojx.

First-time Art Basel film curator Marian Masone, Senior Programming Advisor at the Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York has selected the feature-length film ‘Troublemakers – The Story of Land Art’ (2015) by filmmaker James Crump for a special screening at the Colony Theatre on Friday, December 4.

Gryn’s program of film and video works, drawn from the show’s participating galleries, will include work by Ida Applebroog, Anna Barham, Breda Beban, Janet Biggs, Sue de Beer, Rineke Dijkstra, Tracey Emin, Barbara Hammer, Shirazeh Houshiary, Jaki Irvine, Anna K.E. & Florian Meisenberg, Jumana Manna, Howardena Pindell, Cauleen Smith, Catherine Sullivan, and Marnie Weber.

Every evening, in addition to the Film program, sound works by Sofie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker and Camille Norment will be presented on the state-of-the arts surround sound system in SoundScape Park, curated by David Gryn. In conjunction with the outdoor film screenings, over 80 works have been selected to be shown within a designated Film Library at the Art Basel fair, whose Lead Partner is UBS.

Returning for his fifth year with Art Basel, curator David Gryn’s selection of works for Film will explore the history and future path of moving image artworks. Framed under the title ‘Our Hidden Futures’, the lineup will highlight an international selection of emerging and established artists, encompassing a range of moving image works that illustrate the breadth of these various analogue and digital mediums.

On Saturday, December 5 at 2pm, Art Basel’s Salon program will feature ‘The Artists
Surround Sound Project’ a talk between Art Basel film curator David Gryn and the artists
Sophie Alsbo, Alice Jacobs, Mariele Neudecker and Camille Norment. Art Basel
entry tickets include admission to the Salon.

For the full list of films featured at Art Basel in Miami Beach in 2015, please visit artbasel.com/miami-beach/film

– GENERAL INFORMATION

Daily (December 2 – 6)

Miami Beach Convention Center Film Library

In conjunction with the outdoor program, over 80 selected works will be presented on six touch-screen monitors within the Film Library at Art Basel’s show during show hours. Access with a show entrance ticket.

Nightly (December 2 – 5)

SoundScape Park Evening Film Program

Outdoor screenings will take place in SoundScape Park on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, a three-minute walk from the Miami Beach Convention Center. Admission to Film at SoundScape Park is free. Visitors are encouraged to bring blankets and lawn chairs.

Every evening from 6pm to the start of the first film screening, sound works by different artists, curated by David Gryn, will be presented in SoundScape Park: Weds, Dec 2: Mariele Neudecker / Thurs, Dec 3:  Sofie Alsbo / Fri, Dec 4: Camille Norment / Sat, Dec 5: Alice Jacobs. Free public access, seating is limited – bring a blanket or lawn chair.

– 2015 FILM PROGRAM

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

6pm | Sound work

Mariele Neudecker, Figure of 8 (Rainforest, Ecuador, sound recorded at height: 1.39m, 9.78m, 22.59m, 30.79m and 37.26m), 2015, Galerie Barbara Thumm

8pm | Short Film program | Fairy Doll

Running time approximately 58’; selected by David Gryn

The 2015 Film program will open with a selection of short works in which artists focus on a single portrait to draw out the nuances of what it means to be human.

Rineke Dijkstra, Marianna (The Fairy Doll), 2014, 19’13”, Marian Goodman Gallery

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle, The Countermand, 2014, 9’48”, Jenkins Johnson Gallery

Carla Chaim, Lua Certa, 2011, 1’03”, Galeria Raquel Arnaud

Anna K.E. & Florian Meisenberg, Late Checkout (Part II), 2015, 9’58”, Simone Subal Gallery

Anna Maria Maiolino, Um Momento, Por Favor, 1999/2004, 4’30”, Hauser & Wirth

Howardena Pindell, Free, White and 21, 1980, 12’15”, Garth Greenan Gallery

9pm | Short Film program | Speak Easy

Running time approximately 78’; selected by David Gryn

‘Speak Easy’ will consider the artistic use of the creative, the audience, and the allure of the arena, the theater and the theatrical to explore the unsaid or unsayable.

Simone Leigh & Liz Magic Laser with Alicia Hall Moran, Breakdown, 2011, 9’46”, Tilton Gallery

Jumana Manna, A Sketch of Manners (Alfred Roch’s Last Masquerade), 2013, 12′, CRG Gallery

JoAnn Verburg, Watching Trisha Brown, 2015, 2’40”, Pace/MacGill Gallery

Melanie Smith with Rafael Ortega, Aztec Stadium. Malleable Deed, 2010, 10’29”, Sicardi Gallery

Marinella Senatore, Speak Easy, 2009, 15′, Peres Projects

Catherine Sullivan, Triangle of Need (Olympian and Doves), 2007, 8’22”, Metro Pictures

Ann-Sofi Sidén in collaboration with Jonathan Bepler, Curtain Callers, 2011, 20′, Galerie Barbara Thumm

Thursday, December 3, 2015

6pm | Sound work

Sofie Alsbo, Close Encounter, 2015, , courtesy of the artist

9pm | Afterward Via Fantasia

Catherine Sullivan with George Lewis and Sean Griffin, Afterword via Fantasia, 2015, 60ʹ, Metro Pictures

Catherine Sullivan’s film, ‘Afterword Via Fantasia’, is conceived within the framework of an opera written by composer George Lewis and co-directed by Sullivan and longtime collaborator Sean Griffin. Sullivan transposes material from Lewis’s libretto into a series of scenes shot on sets for other plays with parallel and divergent social and cultural themes. The opera and film are based on Lewis’s widely-acclaimed book A Power Stronger Than Itself: The AACM (Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians) and American Experimental Music. The AACM has long played a key role in American experimental music, forging new models of black identity and social activism.

10pm | Short Film program | Sea of Silence

Running time approximately 56’; selected by David Gryn

Works within ‘Sea of Silence’ reflect on the poetic silence of the absent and, in so doing, create a louder and much more visceral language.

Marnie Weber, Sea of Silence, 2009, 14’15”, Gavlak Gallery / Simon Lee Gallery

Camille Henrot, Million Dollars Point, 2011, 5’35”, Galerie König / kamel mennour

Shirazeh Houshiary, Dust, 2011-2013, 7’08”, Lehmann Maupin

Cauleen Smith, Crow Requiem, 2015, 11′, Corbett vs. Dempsey

Minnette Vári, Quake, 2007, 6’23”, Goodman Gallery

Tracey Emin, Love Never Wanted Me, 2013, 2’48”, Lehmann Maupin

Nikki S. Lee, Yours, 2015, 8’41”, One and J. Gallery

Friday, December 4

6pm | Sound work

Camille Norment, Toll – Dissonant Image, (Re-mixed and mastered from 2011 version of Toll), 2015, courtesy of the artist

8pm | Short Film program | Duet

Running time approximately 45’; selected by David Gryn

‘Duet’ will present artworks that embody pairs, the split screen, duos and unions, which are found in the style of the film, the artistic process or within the narrative.

Janet Biggs, Duet, 2010, 6’47”, Cristin Tierney Gallery

Zanele Muholi, Ayanda & Nhlanhla Moremi’s Wedding, 2013, 11’50”, Stevenson

Nicola Thomas, S-time, 2015, 3’53”, courtesy of the artist

Talia Chetrit, Parents, 2014, 9’44, Sies + Höke, kaufmann repetto

Nicola Thomas, Julian in two parts, 2015 2’02”, courtesy of the artist

Sue de Beer, The Blue Lenses, 2014, 19’03”, Marianne Boesky Gallery

9pm | Short Film program | Snow Job

Running time approximately 62’; selected by David Gryn

Selected works in ‘Snow Job’ use satire to communicate messages that engage and humor us.

Berna Reale, Cantando na Chuva (Singing in the Rain), 2014, 4’15”, Galeria Nara Roesler

Shana Moulton, MindPlace ThoughtStream, 2014, 11’57”, Galerie Gregor Staiger

Mary Reid Kelley, Camel Toe, 2008, 1’25”, Pilar Corrias

Barbara Hammer, Snow Job: The Media Hysteria of Aids, 1986, 7’44”, KOW

Diana Thater, Male Gyr-Peregrine Falcon (Grim), 2012, 30”, Hauser & Wirth

Chloe Wise & Claire Christerson, Greece, 2015, 3′, courtesy of the artists

Ida Applebroog, It’s No Use Alberto, 1978, 9’36”, Hauser & Wirth

Breda Beban, Jason’s Dream, 1997, 10′, courtesy of the artist’s estate & Kalfayan Galleries

Mary Reid Kelley, Swinburne’s Pasiphae, 2014, 8’58’, Pilar Corrias

Judith Hopf, Lily´s Laptop, 2013, 5’29”, kaufmann repetto

8:30 pm | James Crump, Troublemakers – The Story of Land Art, 2015

Special Film Screening at Colony Theatre, 1040 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach

Running time 72ʹ; selected by Marian Masone

Troublemakers – The Story of Land Art, 2015 unearths the history of land art in the tumultuous late 1960s and early 1970s. Focused on a cadre of renegade New York artists that sought to transcend the limitations of painting and sculpture by producing earthworks on a monumental scale in the desolate desert spaces of the American southwest, the film includes rare footage and interviews with artists such as Robert Smithson (Spiral Jetty), Walter De Maria (The Lightning Field) and Michael Heizer (Double Negative). The screening is followed by a panel discussion between the movie’s Director James Crump and Art Basel Film co-curator Marian Masone.

Saturday, December 5, 2015

6pm | Sound work

Alice JacobsThe Intent I Owe, 2015, courtesy of the artist

8pm | Short Film program | Vanishing Point 

Running time approximately 58’; selected by David Gryn

‘Vanishing Point’ will feature a selection of artworks which employ kinetic and choreographed movement to investigate the factory, machines, and the futility of war, as well as the demise of manufacturing and its consequences.

Breda Beban, Let’s call it love, 2000, 7’30’’, artist’s estate, Kalfayan Galleries

María Fernanda Cardoso, On the Origins of Art: Maratus Volans, Male and Female, Artists, 2015, 3’13”, Casas Riegner

Janet Biggs, Vanishing Point, 2009, 10’32”, Cristin Tierney Gallery

Fritzia Irizar, Sin título (requiem JMAF), 2015, 4’19”, Arredondo \ Arozarena

Suzanne Harris, The Wheels / Flying Machine, 1973, 5’47”, Rhona Hoffman Gallery

Anna Barham, The squid that hid, 2015, 5’05”, Galerie Nordenhake

Guan Xiao, Hidden Track, 2015, 4’51”, Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler

Susanne M. Winterling, Immersion Vertex (Prototyp Diadem), 2’22”, 2014, Jessica Silverman Gallery

Pia Camil, No A Trio A, 2013, 7’31”, OMR

Cornelia Parker, War Machine, 2015, 9’25”, courtesy of the artist and Frith Street Gallery

9pm | Bikini Carwash

Running time approximately 52’; selected by David Gryn

The seven works in this program will explore the great outdoors, capturing urban and rural encounters.

Liz Cohen, Bikini Carwash, 2002, 5’58”, Salon 94

Marnie Weber, Songs Hurt Me, 1994, 2′, Gavlak Gallery / Simon Lee Gallery

Jaki Irvine, Se Compra: Sin é, 2014, 17’37”, Kerlin Gallery

Micol Assaël, Overstrain, 2012, 3′, ZERO…

Kristin Oppenheim, Ultramarine, 2015, 7’43”, in collaboration with Don Maclean, 303 Gallery

Cauleen Smith, H-E-L-L-O, 2014, 11′, Corbett vs. Dempsey

Milena Bonilla, Ceremony for a Homogeneous Landscape, 2009, 2’34”, mor charpentier

RELATED LINKS

New World Symphony https://www.nws.edu/events-tickets/art-basel-at-soundscape-park/

Artlyst http://www.artlyst.com/articles/art-basel-announces-2015-film-programme-for-miami-beach-fair

ARTnews http://www.artnews.com/2015/10/23/art-basel-miami-beach-2015-announces-film-program/

Artlyst on Talks program http://www.artlyst.com/articles/artists-and-art-professionals-lead-talks-programme-at-art-basel-miami-2015

Buro on Nikki S. Lee http://www.buro247.sg/culture/news/art-basel-2015-program-for-miami-beach.html

– NOTES TO EDITORS

About the Curators

David Gryn

David Gryn is the founder and director of Daata Editions, a new online platform commissioning artists video, sound and web editioned artworks and director of London’s Artprojx, screening, curating, promoting and lecturing on artists’ moving image and other art projects, working with leading contemporary artists, art galleries, museums, art fairs, art schools and film festivals worldwide.

Marian Masone

Marian Masone is a film curator, lecturer and writer based in New York. For over 20 years Masone has worked at The Film Society of Lincoln Center, America’s pre-eminent film organization. She sits on the selection committees for two of The Film Society’s most prestigious festivals: ‘The New York Film Festival’ and ‘New Directors/New Films’, a co-production with the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Masone has been a guest lecturer and curator for leading institutions such as Parsons School of Design in New York and Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid. Her writings on film and media have appeared in many leading newspapers and magazines.

About Art Basel

Art Basel stages the world’s premier art shows for Modern and contemporary works, sited in Basel, Miami Beach and Hong Kong. Defined by its host city and region, each show is unique, which is reflected in its participating galleries, artworks presented, and the content of parallel programming produced in collaboration with local institutions for each edition. In addition to ambitious stands featuring leading galleries from around the world, each show’s exhibition sectors spotlight the latest developments in the visual arts, offering visitors new ideas, new inspiration and new contacts in the art world.

Partners

UBS, global Lead Partner of Art Basel, has supported the organization for more than 20 years. As Art Basel’s global network has expanded, so too has UBS’s commitment and lead partnership, which includes all three shows in Basel, Miami Beach and Hong Kong. In addition to its support of Art Basel, UBS has a long and substantial record of engagement in contemporary art: as a holder of one of the world’s most distinguished corporate art collections, as an active partner in global contemporary art projects such as the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, and as a source of information and insights through the UBS Art Competence Center, UBS Arts Forum and its new contemporary art news-focused app, ‘Planet Art’.

Associate Partners Davidoff, the prestigious Swiss cigar brand, Audemars Piguet, the independent high-end watch manufacturer, and NetJets, the world leader in private aviation, support Art Basel across its three shows. Art Basel’s Media Partners are The Financial Times and the Miami Herald, and the VIP car service at the show is by BMW. Long-standing partner AXA ART, the international art insurance specialist, provides VIP guided tours at all shows. For further information on Art Basel’s partners, please visit artbasel.com/partners.

Important Dates for Media

Private View
Wednesday, December 2, 2015, 11am to 8pm (by invitation only)

Vernissage
Thursday, December 3, 2015, 11am to 3pm (by invitation only)

Public Days
Thursday, December 3, 2015, 3pm to 8pm
Friday, December 4, 2015, 12noon to 8pm
Saturday, December 5, 2015, 12noon to 8pm
Sunday, December 6, 2015, 12noon to 6pm

Upcoming Art Basel shows
Hong Kong, March 24 – 26, 2016
Basel, June 16 – 19, 2016

Press accreditation
Online registration for press accreditation is now open and will close on November 13, 2015. Please visit artbasel.com/accreditation.

Media information online

Media information and images can be downloaded directly from artbasel.com/press.

For the latest updates on Art Basel, visit artbasel.com, find us on Facebook at facebook.com/artbasel
or follow @artbasel on Instagram, Google+, Twitter, Weibo and Wechat.

Press Contacts

Art Basel, Dorothee Dines

Tel. +41 58 206 27 06, press@artbasel.com

PR Representatives for North and South America and the Middle East

Fitz & Co., Katrina Weber Ashour

Tel. +1 212 627 1653, katrina@fitzandco.com

PR Representatives for Florida

Garber & Goodman, Robert Goodman

Tel. +1 305 674 12 92, FLrepresentative@artbasel.com

PR Representatives for Europe

Sutton, Sarah Norton

Tel. +44 20 7183 3577, sarah@suttonpr.com

PR Representatives for Asia

Sutton, Erica Siu

Tel. +852 2528 0792, erica@suttonprasia.com

Daata Editions and Monegraph Grow Online Marketplace for Digital Art – Art in America

In Art in America, Art Market, artists, Daata Editions, Digital, Internet, Monegraph, Moving Image, Online, Sound, Video, Web on 18/08/2015 at 10:47 am
Ed Fornieles Falling 2015

Ed Fornieles, Falling 2015, Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions

Daata Editions and Monegraph Grow Online Marketplace for Digital Art

Art in America

by Whitney Mallett

The art market continues to grow, with spring auction house sales totalling a record-breaking $2.6 billion this year. But video and new media works make up a fraction of the works sold, and are only represented in 10 percent of collections. Although more artists than ever are working digitally, many of them find it difficult to monetize their work and have expanded their practices to include more easily commodifiable objects. The problem of selling new media works, of course, is not new. Since video art emerged in the 1960s and ‘70s, new media artists have struggled to earn a living comparable to their colleagues working in more traditional forms like painting and sculpture. Our recent shift to digital, though, rather than being another source of the problem, just might lead us toward a solution.

Two companies are working to develop new systems for selling intangible work and getting artists paid. David Gryn, a curator and consultant based in London, launched Daata Editions in May with support from collector Anita Zabludowicz. The digital platform is devoted to selling select video, Web-based and sound works commissioned from artists with gallery representation. Artist and professor Kevin McCoy’s platform Monegraph, which launches in September, is more democratic. The service offers an online marketplace as well as a licensing system based on similar encryption technology used by Bitcoin and other so-called “cryptocurrencies.”

Over the last two decades Gryn has worked primarily with artists who create moving image works. During a phone interview, the Daata Editions director noted two paradoxical trends: the art market is dominated by fairs and auction houses that don’t cater to video and digital work, while digital media is ubiquitous in everyday life. “It dawns on me every time I go to an art fair that galleries don’t know how to sell moving image work and people don’t know how to look at it and buy it,” he said. In conceiving Daata Editions, he imagined an online platform as a more intuitive way for people to consume and buy these works.

The first season of commissions for Daata includes seven videos, six sound pieces and six Web-based works. Contributing video artists include Jon Rafman and Ed Fornieles (who are represented in the Zabludowicz Collection), as well as Amalia Ulman and Takeshi Murata. Chloe Wise and Charles Richardson are among the six artists tapped for Web-based commissions; Stephen Vitiello and Matt Copson are featured sound artists. All the works can be accessed on the site, with a small watermark in the corner as the only distinguishing feature from the editioned version for purchase. (For the sound pieces, there’s an equivalent aural watermark woven into the piece—a few seconds of beeps introduced about 20 seconds into the work.) Buying an edition also means the collector can download the file. Gryn envisions Daata Editions as an accessible way to “empower the market” to take ownership of digital work.

Selling reproducible digital works has been difficult in a market geared toward unique objects like paintings and sculptures. Monegraph is a platform geared primarily to establishing usage rights for digital works. “We make a distinction between the bits and the rights,” explained Monegraph co-founder and CEO McCoy when I spoke with him in New York, “and that’s a fundamental belief we’ve built the platform around.” The bits, meaning the digital information encoded in a file, can be pirated or copied. “But instead of worrying about those bits, let’s instead have clear articulable ownership and rights around the usage of media,” McCoy said.

Monegraph verifies ownership of creative works through the same system that cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin register transactions: unique alphanumeric strings of characters on a secure database that is both decentralized and a matter of public record. “All our contracts are living on the block chain in the public ledger,” said McCoy. Artists can create contracts on Monegraph’s platform without specialized technical knowledge, simply by registering the work under their name. They can also register art for sale as a unique work, a limited edition or unlimited stock media. The registrant controls whether the buyer has resale rights and whether the work can be remixed. Selecting “no remix” doesn’t change the ease at which someone can take a screen shot of the work and use it as source material, but it does specify usage so that contesting the remix no longer falls into a hazy legal zone.

While Monegraph gives artists a platform to sell work and control of the terms of sale, Daata Editions defines the contract that it offers to artists. Daata pays the artists upfront for the commissioned works and grants them a 15 percent royalty on sales, as well as two editions of the work they produce. Although the works could potentially be pirated and reproduced, Daata controls rightful ownership through a simple certificate system and maintains the value of the work through an editioning model. Each work is produced in an edition of 15, the price rising with each subsequent edition that sells. The going rate for the first edition is $100 or $200; the highest valued video works on the site are being sold for $5,600. “It can possibly give people that thrill they get at an auction,” Gryn says of the pricing system, “where they want to get the work before [the price gets] too high.”

Monegraph and Daata Editions also take different approaches to authorization. McCoy has opted for a digital verification system at Monegraph, whereas Gryn doesn’t think digital art needs a structure any more secure than those already used for other forms of art. Intellectual property attorney Andrew Gerber suggests that these different verification systems would both hold up in a court of law. “If there’s an instance of copyright infringement and the potential plaintiff had handwritten documents in crayon that clearly established ownership of the infringed work it would be, from a legal perspective, identical to a block chain that established ownership.” He added, however, that the current copyright system is antiquated, and the registry is hard to find information in. “People are excited that this new technology presents an easier way to find out who owns what.”

There’s some precedent for these contracts and systems in the world of new media art. McCoy, who creates interactive films, videos, installations and performances with his partner Jennifer McCoy, has sold and distributed work via the gallery system, as well as through independent distribution services that were established during the rise of video art in the ‘60s and ‘70s. Nonprofit archives like Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and Video Data Bank (VDB) facilitate both the sale and rentals of works in their collections. Most artists receive royalties in the form of screening fees when the works are shown at universities or museums. McCoy noted that this nonprofit model emerged alongside alternative and artist-run spaces like Anthology Film Archives, Artists Space and Printed Matter.

Video Databank, EAI and LUX [a moving image nonprofit in England] have been doing it brilliantly,” Gryn said, “but their model is ultimately an academic rental model, which doesn’t often cater toward the audience which has now emerged through the art market.” He added, “I think you need to be addressing as many voices as possible in our art ecosystem.” The global class of collectors that Gryn is addressing through Daata, able to flit from continent to continent to attend the ever-increasing number of art fairs, is a relatively new audience.

Monegraph exemplifies another recent change in the art ecosystem: the flirtation between the creative and tech industries, which has the potential to draw alternative funding sources funding like venture capital money into the arts. The business developed from McCoy and New York-based tech entrepreneur Anil Dash’s presentation at the New Museum-affiliated Internet-based arts nonprofit Rhizome’s “Seven on Seven” conference in 2014. Because of its pairing of artists with technology, Rhizome is able to lure Silicon Valley participants for the conference. Today Monegraph is a member of New Inc., the New Museum’s co-working space designed to breed these sort of start-up hybrids.

Like Kickstarter, Etsy or Vimeo, Monegraph’s model is structured around a demographic of prosumers, a demographic of creators that blur the distinction between media producers and consumers. It will take a percentage of the sales made through its platform (though one can register authorship through Monegraph and sell through other means) and will launch a subscription model similar to Vimeo’s, including features for professionals and businesses like higher usage rates. “We’ve seen the democratization of the means of production,” explains McCoy, noting that nearly everyone is a content producer in the online ecosystem. “I think the role of the artist or of the creator is more broadly distributed now.”

Monegraph aims to have a variety of works registered on its platform, from fine art to stock photos. McCoy plans to sell his own work on Monegraph and wants other artists from the gallery world to use the service, though he also relishes in the unpredictability of exactly who will relate to it. “For a long time I’ve made systems of various kinds—data-based systems, imaging systems, discourse systems—and I see this as the same thing,” said McCoy. “It’s going to be a platform people are going to use and use in strange ways. I’m just trying to get to that point.”

Both McCoy and Gryn seem to agree that a healthy online art economy depends on decentralization. McCoy says that the anti-proprietary attitude ushered in by the sharing, remixing and creative-commons era of Web 2.0 “paved the way for big aggregators to come and suck in all the content. Now we have Facebook and a couple of other centralized platforms.”

Gryn, for his part, laments the comparisons of Daata Editions to Artsy (a site that promotes and sells art in all mediums) or Sedition (a sales site for digital art). He says it suggests a mentality that people have come to expect digital monopolies, but he insists there needs to be competition between platforms for successful monetization. With Daata Editions, “it’s not trying to be dominant and take over the world. It’s trying to be a business model that can hopefully exist with many others, but there aren’t a plethora of them yet. If there were a plethora of those platforms paying artists to make work, then all of a sudden you’ve got an economy for artists.”

Article Link: http://www.artinamericamagazine.com/news-features/news/daata-editions-and-monegraph-grow-online-marketplace-for-digital-art/

Daata Editions

Monegraph

Art in America

Interviews from Yale University Radio WYBCX by Brainard Carey

In Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, artists, Artprojx, Artworld, Brainard Carey, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, digital art, Interviews, Moving Image, Video Art, WYBCX, Yale, Yale University, Yale University Radio on 13/07/2015 at 6:21 pm

cropped-wybcxhires-1

Interviews from Yale University Radio WYBCX

Conversations with artists, writers, curators and more – about art and the art world as we know it.

Hosted by Brainard Carey

Quite a few names here:

G. Roger Denson
Kathy Battista
Buzz Spector
Connie Butler
Rob Garrett
Brian Buttler
Sans façon
Uta Kögelsberger
Steve Katz
Jack Sal
Michael Workman
Colin Westerbeck
Susan Silas
Paula Hayes
Bruno Leitão
Lee Boroson
David Gryn
Helen Molesworth
Nils Norman
Heidi Voet
Khosro Adibi
Adam Moskowitz
Emily Cheng
Christian Siekmeier
Regine Basha
Conor Fields
Chris Verene
Barry N. Neuman
Barbara A. MacAdam
Jason Middlebrook
Shaheen Merali
Jennifer Parker
Cristiana de Marchi
Kevin Clarke
Dotty Attie
Simone Battisti
Céline Condorelli
Rachael Gorchov
Bérénice Reynaud
Stephan Balleux
Warren Neidich
Saul Melman
Sue Stoffel
Michael Steinberg
Liz Rosenfeld
Bonnie Marranca
Karim Noureldin
Tim Sullivan
Allard van Hoorn
Joseph Nechvatal
Christian L. Frock
Siona Benjamin
Toni Kleinlercher
Stephan Pascher
Anton Kern
Catarina Leitão
Ramesch Daha
Nancy Chaikin
Elena Cologni
Jacob Fabricius
Stephen Lack
Richard West
Steven Rand
Laura F. Gibellini
Valerie Sonnenthal
Mary Mattingly
Suzanne Landau
Ilya Budraitskis
Ofri Cnaani
Matthew Rose
Christina McPhee
Chris Wilder
Stefan Bruggeman
Jelle Bouwhuis
Robert Storr
Anuradha Vikram
Jason Yates
Derek Boshier
Rainer Judd
Ingrid Bachmann
Cora Cohen
Roger Herman
Michelle Grabner
Susan Leopold
Diane Lewis
Flora Fairbairn
RaúI Zamudio
Ben Mills
Carla Camacho
Giuliana Bruno
Brett Littman
Jeff Talman
Maurizio Bortolotti
Chiemi Karasawa
Alejandro Zaera-Polo
Joe Davis
Lawrence R. Rinder
Dane Jensen
Jorge Pardo
David Balzer
Laurie Rosenwald
Marlen Suyapa Bodden
Erwin Redl
Rafal Niemojewski
Douglas I. Sheer
Elizabeth Dunbar
Bill Arning
Rachel Cook
Rebecca Belmore
Rui Amaral
Gaëtane Verna
Duane Michals
Joyce Kozloff
Ann Landi
Jo-Anne McArthur
Heather Nicol
Lara Almarcegui
Pacita Abad Art Estate / Interview with Jack Garrity
Katrin Sigurdardottir
Tyler Barstow
Barbara Rachko
Mira Schor
Deborah Kass
Nancy Spector
Vicki DaSilva
Michael David
Gary Lucas
Susan Sollins
Dave Hardy
Erin Shirreff
Jenna Lash
Karyn Olivier
Judy Glantzman
Betty Cuningham
Barry Schwabsky
Lawrence Weiner
Barbara Gallucci
Ida Applebroog
Stanley Casselman
Todd Levin
David Hickey
Jennifer Steinkamp
Adam Putnam
Richard Klein
Ann Lauterbach
Linda Yablonsky
Tamar Ettun
Derek Larson
Jo Nigoghossian
Ken Lum
Eve Andree Laramee
Carol Snow
Robert Taplin
Ester Partegas
Joan Snyder
Sheri Pasquarella
Raphael Rubinstein
Kimsooja
Brooke Kamin Rapaport
Marie Lorenz
Annette Lemieux
Nancy Princenthal
Christoph Heinrich
Gregory Volk
Robin Hill
Nina Katchadourian
WIlliam Pope L.
Chrissie Iles
Jen Durbin
Lisa Hoke
Rick Beerhorst
Arthur Danto (from 2011)
Barbra Drizin
Rita Reed
Katrina Mayer
Peter Ragnar
Grace Graupe Pillard
Sid Limitz
Paul Miller, aka DJ Spooky
John Currin
Mary Ceruti, Sculpture Center
Sarah Thornton
Catya Plate
Fred Wilson
Spencer Tunick
David Batchelor
Tom Sachs
Mary Heilman
Marilyn Mintner
Gregory Crewdson
Grayson Cox
David Wolfe, Raw food nutritionist
Ken Aronson, (hell.com)
Daniel Salin
Nato Thompson
Dan Cameron
Shamim Momin
David Ross
Abbey Ryan
Laura Hoptman

Hercules Rough Cut by David Blandy at Bloomberg SPACE

In Artist, Bloomberg, Daata, Daata Editions, David Blandy, Hercules, London, Moorgate, Moving Image, Video on 10/07/2015 at 3:40 pm

HERC 4

David Blandy 
HERCULES : ROUGH CUT
Bloomberg SPACE
50 Finsbury Square
London EC2A 1HD

Exhibition dates: July 10 – September 19, 2015

Hercules Rough Cut, David Blandy’s new commission for Bloomberg SPACE, explores empire, civilisation, London and language in a hypnotically rotating, mutating installation of video and voice. Sound by Larry Achiampong. Curated by Sigrid Kirk.

More information: http://www.bloombergspace.com

David Blandy has artworks now available at Daata Editions http://daata-editions.com

Daata Editions featured in Elephant Magazine – Summer 2015

In Art, Art Basel, artists, Daata Editions, Elephant, Frieze, Magazine, Moving Image, NADA, Post-Internet, Video on 29/06/2015 at 12:00 pm
ed-fornieles-bathing

Ed Fornieles, Bathing (2015). Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions

Daata-Editions

Dates: Ongoing

Daata-Editions launched its online platform for the sale of video, web and sound editions at NADA, Frieze New York, Salon 94 and Soho House this spring. The simple and extremely well designed project allows collectors to easily and confidently download digital art forms that have until now been thought of as difficult to acquire.

“It’s about creating an economy for artists working in these mediums during a curious time of change” says founder David Gryn, who has been working with artists for over twenty years, including curating the film programme at Art Basel Miami Beach. “People think that online is some kind of mythological space where things happen automatically, but that’s not the case. We need to encourage artists to know that these mediums are valued.”

‘Season One’ of Daata-Editions sees 18 artists including Ed Forneiles, Leo Gabin, Chloe Wise, Florian Meisenberg, David Blandy, Hannah Perry and Ilit Azoulay commissioned to produce six works, no longer than three minutes long each, which will be released on the site regularly. The artists are commissioned and paid in full for the works, as well as receiving royalties on the sale of the editions, and are free to experiment entirely on their artworks.

You can view and buy the works at www.daata-editions.com

by Molly Taylor, Elephant Magazine

2015-04-02-Daata-FriezeQuarterPageAd-draft02-2 copy

Taken from the latest print issue of Elephant Magazine

Elephant, Issue 23, Summer 2015 – What is Post Internet Art ?

Pages 19, 29, 135, 136

Elephant and Daata image

Daata Editions by Courtney Malick

In Art, artists, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Empower, Freieze, Moving Image, NADA, New York, NYC, Sound, Video on 01/06/2015 at 1:11 pm

Screen Shot 2015-06-01 at 11.07.53 copy

DAATA EDITIONS LAUNCH – A REFLECTION

by Courtney Malick

Perhaps one of the most difficult merges to successfully forge within contemporary art is between the curatorial and the commercial. Often when we seek to place what, from a curatorial perspective, seem to be productive frameworks around a grouping of artists, their work, and the ideas that they share, we lose the quality of broad universalism and “timelessness” that collectors may seek in new acquisitions to the margins of site-specificity and the binds of “context.” What makes malleable and unique projects such as Daata Editions stand out in their attempt at the pairing of these two supposedly adverse spectrums, that of the curatorial and that of the commercial, is its specific interest in artists whose work yields to the diverse but nonetheless pre-framed, non-site of the Internet. Furthermore, as both a curatorial and commercial project that is presenting new and commissioned works in video, new media and sound, Daata Editions is able to set certain guidelines beforehand, which allows visitors to the site and potential collectors of the works available there, a levelled playing field. In this way the sometimes fussy issue of context, from a curatorial standpoint, can be seen as a benefit rather than a constraint, which thus furthers the meaning of the works in question.

This platform is particularly exciting to see emerging right now, as so many younger artists, including all of those whose work appears in the first iteration of Daata Editions that launched at NADA New York in May 2015, are working in ways that resist traditional modes of exhibition, reception and therefore of collecting as well. It is important that while we continue to find new artists whose work pushes the definition of contemporary art, that there are also ever developing formats through which such work can be accessed and best understood. Older, conventional formats often found within the white cube, in which paintings are still hung on white walls and sculptures still meticulously placed on white pedestals, need not be replaced, so long as alternate avenues through which to engage with art and the complex ideas that it generates, continues to expand along with the work itself – such is clearly the admirable aim of Daata Editions. Contrary to the well trodden paths canonized by the white cube, artists such as Ed Fornieles, Jon Rafman, Amalia Ullman and the many others that Daata Editions commissioned work from, all of whom are still in relatively early stages of their practices, are specifically trouble-shooting, so to speak, in order to produce work that operates on other levels that exist in various realms including on the internet, within mobile social media systems, as apps, and generally as circuit-driven pieces of a much larger whole, as opposed to creating singular, physically tangible works that stand on their own or make one digestible statement.

For example, Ullman’s video, White Flag Emoji 1 (2015), utilizes Youtube clips and a security camera system called Dropcam and is set in various Airbnb apartments. In this way, while the work itself manifests as a singular video, its contents are fragmented and reference the online world, in its similarly fractured and link-driven nature. Such complex work still finds itself in galleries and museums, but it is most at home online, where it exists within a broader milieu and where its potential audience and collector-base can continue to grow and grow over time. Daata Editions also allows for a new generation of collectors, by commissioning works that exist within a larger edition range and are thus more affordable than most work of any media that is found and acquired through commercial galleries.

It is clear that Daata Editions allows for many new ways to think about collecting video, sound and new media art, and this exciting turn is also extended with the project’s intermittent interjections into art fairs, such as their recent collaboration with NADA New York. Though Daata Editions home base will remain online, where it has the ability to seep most easily into more and more visual and discursive outlets where its commissioned works can be seen, partnering with other commercial organizations such as NADA and Frieze among others, continues to promote their curatorial agenda and at the same time allows more potential collectors to consider new strategies for collecting editioned and digitized artworks. The more Daata Editions spreads this new methodology both online and through ongoing collaboration with various exhibition and commercially oriented organizations, the more the project’s core model will mirror the nature of the work it presents, which functions on various levels simultaneously. It is this through-line between work and methodology that makes the project especially compelling to watch as it continues to unfold.

Text taken from the Foreward at Daata Editions https://daata-editions.com/info/foreword

Courtney Malick website http://courtneymalick.com/

The Miami, Moscow and Bermondsey Film Selections – Artists Sound of Film – Moscow 16 May 2015

In Art, artists, Artprojx, Daata, Daata Editions, Film, Moscow, Moving Image, Museum Nights, OM Rider, Video on 04/05/2015 at 10:15 am
131110-Takeshi-Murata-OM-Rider

Still: Takeshi Murata, OM Rider 2013, courtesy the artist, Salon 94, Ratio 3

The Miami, Moscow and Bermondsey Film Selections

Artist Sound of Film

curated by David Gryn, Artprojx, Daata Editions

Friday 16 May, 2015

Moscow Museum Nights

The films are selections of works that were originally selected and curated by David Gryn for the Film programme at Art Basel in Miami Beach over the last 5 years. The films were all played on the New World Symphony Center’s screening wall in Soundscape Park during the annual art fair. This selection was played outdoors in Moscow as part of the Museum Nights in May 2014 along with DJ Max Reinhardt and then played at the closing of the Bermondsey Project in London. 

These works all engage with music, rhythm and sound and remain resonant from their initial playing. They all have a power that is far beyond just the work, one that creates lingering memory with the viewer long after the work has been seen and finished. The selection of these was driven by their sound, engagement and that the language needed to digest these works is that of audio-visual. These works reflect on the current trends and modes of communication such as YouTube, TV, animation, gaming, social media and used to create new images, sounds and unexpected connections. Selected as these works communicate across cultures and language, as they are all predominantly music based soundtracks.

Programme:

Nick Abrahams – ekki mukk, 2012, 10’30”

Cory Arcangel – Paganini Caprice No.5, 2011, 3’41”

Dara Birnbaum – Arabesque, 2011/2013, 6’37”

Pierre Bismuth – Following Elvis Presley’s Hands in Jailhouse Rock, 2011, 3’12”

Martin Creed – Work No. 1700, 2013

Nathalie Djurberg with Hans Berg – I wasn’t made to play the son, 2011, 6’27”

Kota Ezawa – Beatles Über California, 2010, 2’03”

Dara Friedman – RITE 2012

Leo Gabin – Stackin, 2010, 2’38”

Rashaad Newsome – The Conductor, 2005/2010, 6’18”

Theaster Gates – Breathing, 2010, 6’58”

William Kentridge with Philip Miller – Tango for Page Turning, 2013, 2’48”

Lina Lapelyte – Candy Shop, 2014

Ari Marcopoulous – Detroit, 2010, 7’32”

Ryan McGinley – Varúð, 2012, 8′

Takeshi Murata – OM Rider, 2013, 11’39”

Laurel Nakadate – 51/50, 2009, 3’09”

Nicola Thomas – Dancing with Monk, 2013, 2’55″

David Gryn screens, curates and promotes artists’ moving image and sound, working with leading contemporary art galleries, museums, art fairs and artists worldwide. David has launched Daata Editions (May 14), a new online platform dedicated to commissioning artists to make video, sound and web based artworks for sale and research.

For more information on the artists and other things related contact:

David Gryn, Daata Editions info@daata-editions.com

http://daata-editions.com

https://davidgryn.wordpress.com

http://www.salon94.com/video-wall/the-digital-revolutionaries-the-shiboogi-version

Film program at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2014 curated by David Gryn

In ABMB, Art, Art Basel Miami Beach, ArtBasel, Artprojx, David Gryn, Film, Miami, Moving Image, New World Center, Video on 11/11/2014 at 4:52 pm
CiprianMureanUnchienandalou

Ciprian Mureşan, Un chien andalou, 2004, 51”, David Nolan Gallery

ART BASEL PRESS RELEASE
MIAMI BEACH | NOVEMBER 11 | 2014

Film: Art Basel announces 2014 program for Miami Beach

From December 3 through 7, 2014, Art Basel’s Film sector will include over 80 films and videos selected by David Gryn, director of London’s Artprojx. Gryn’s program of film and video works, drawn from the show’s participating galleries, includes work by Charles Atlas, Martin Creed, Susan Hiller, Parker Ito, Mark Leckey, Babette Mangolte, Takeshi Murata, Laure Prouvost, Alex Prager, Mark Wallinger, and a tribute to Harun Farocki, who passed away this July. In conjunction with the popular outdoor screenings in SoundScape Park on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, an extended film program will be presented within Art Basel’s newly designed film viewing room inside the Miami Beach Convention Center.

Curated around the notion of Playfulness, David Gryn’s fourth selection for Film will feature a wide array of film and video works: from Susan Hiller’s scientific Resounding (Infrared) (2014) to Atsushi Kaga’s dark and quirky 2007 series of hand-drawn animations and Hans Op de Beeck’s sublime Parade (2012). A highlight of the program will pair Charles Atlas’s 1986 film Ex Romance, and a new Miami Beach-specific edit of Parker Ito’s Wipeout XL. Artist Tabor Robak and David Gryn will co-curate a series of films addressing the unearthly reverberations of the Internet, gaming, and digital magical- realism, featuring work by younger artists Jon Rafman and Oliver Laric, alongside a tribute to the late Harun Farocki. The program will also look at dance in film with works by Dara Friedman, Rashaad Newsome and the seminal filmmaker Babette Mangolte.  FILM TRAILER

Every evening from 6pm to the start of the first film screening, surround sound works by Larry Achiampong, Jennie C. Jones, Stephen Vitiello and Raed Yassin will be presented on the state-of-the arts surround sound system in SoundScape Park.

Art Basel Film Library, has a dedicated film viewing room within the Miami Beach Convention Center’s exhibition halls. An extended selection of over 120 selected works, also curated by Gryn, will be presented for individual, viewer-directed private screening. Access is free with an entry ticket to the show. Daily Dec 3- Dec7.

On Friday, December 5, at 2pm, Art Basel’s Salon program will feature
Playfulness: artists as online gamers, surfers and armchair digital revolutionaries, a talk between David Gryn and the artists Tabor Robak and Rachel Rose, moderated by the curator Chrissie Iles. Art Basel entry tickets include admission to Salon.

For the full gallery list and extended film program, please visit: artbasel.com/miamibeach/film.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Nightly (December 3 – 6)

SoundScape Park Evening Film Program
Outdoor screenings will take place in SoundScape Park on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center, a three-minute walk from the Miami Beach Convention Center. Admission to Film at SoundScape Park is free. Visitors are encouraged to bring blankets and lawn chairs.

Every evening from 6pm to the start of the first film screening, sound works by different artists will be presented in SoundScape Park: Wednesday: Stephen Vitiello, Scraped and Bowed, 2013-2014, Courtesy of the artist. Thursday: Larry Achiampong, The Mogya Project, 2014, Courtesy of the artist. Friday: Jennie C. Jones, From the Low to Higher Resonance, 2011-2014, Sikkema Jenkins & Co. Saturday: Raed Yassin, The Deaf Oud, 2010, Kalfayan Galleries.

Free public access, seating is limited – bring a blanket or lawn chair.

 FILM TRAILER

DETAILED FILM PROGRAM CURATED BY DAVID GRYN

Wednesday, December 3, 8pm

Playfulness
Running time 65′
In this program the intelligence, wit, and humor of artists such as Turner Prize winners Mark Leckey, Elizabeth Price, Martin Creed, and Laure Prouvost will be punctuated, among others, by the brief digitally animated paintings of Hayal Pozanti and the slapstick human sculptural intervention of Wood & Harrison.

Hayal Pozanti, A Lifetime of Likes, 2014, 25″, Jessica Silverman Gallery
Wood & Harrison, Board, 1993, 3’02”, Carroll / Fletcher
Alex Rodríguez, Nocturno 2, 2013, 3’59”, Casas Riegner
Hayal Pozanti, IP Overlords, 2014, 12″, Jessica Silverman Gallery
Mark Leckey, Pearl Vision, 2012, 3’10”, Gavin Brown’s enterprise, Cabinet, Galerie Buchholz
Wood & Harrison, Headstand, 1995, 1’02”, Carroll / Fletcher
Brian Bress, The Portrait Room, 2006, 4’10”, Cherry and Martin
Hayal Pozanti, Mobile Blinders, 2014, 15″, Jessica Silverman Gallery
Elizabeth Price, The Tent, 2012, 12′, MOT International
Rachel Rose, A Minute Ago, 2014, 8’43”, Courtesy of the artist
Hayal Pozanti, Virtual Diaspora, 2014, 22″, Jessica Silverman Gallery
Camille Henrot, Coupé/Décalé, 2010, 5’20”, Metro Pictures, kamel mennour
Wood & Harrison, Device, 1996, 2’45”, Carroll / Fletcher
Tomislav Gotovac, Feeling 7, 2000, 4’06”, Alexander Gray Associates, galerie frank elbaz
Hayal Pozanti, Empathy Box, 2014, 22″, 2014, 25″, Jessica Silverman Gallery
Taro Izumi, Steak House, 2009, 3’51”, Galerie Georges-Philippe & Nathalie Vallois
Laure Prouvost, For A Better Life, 2006, 1’52”, MOT International
Wood & Harrison, Three-Legged, 1997, 3’39”, Carroll / Fletcher
Martin Creed, Work No. 670 Orson and Sparky, 2007, 4’16”, Hauser & Wirth

Wednesday, December 3, 9pm

Armchair Surfers
Running time 60′
The artists in this program place a mirror in front of us – the Armchair Surfers of the 21st century – to explore the impact of an all-encompassing digitized world on humanity. In these works humor, titillation, coolness, memories, self-absorption and otherwise quirky reflections merge with our daily consumption of social media.

CAR (Conceptual Artists Research/Michelle Grabner), Pool, 1996, 3’10”, James Cohan Gallery
Saya Woolfalk, ChimaTek: Hybridization Machine, 2013, 3’40”, Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects
Chris Doyle (with music by Joe Arcidiacono), Waste_Generation, 2010-2011, 6’29”, Andrew Edlin Gallery
CAR (Conceptual Artists Research/Michelle Grabner), Egg Toss, 1996, 1’52”, James Cohan Gallery
Charles Richardson, Rehearsal (Miami edit), 2014, 4’, Courtesy of the artist
Nate Boyce, Scroll Sequence, 2014, 5’33”, Altman Siegel
Dashiell Manley, Untitled, 2011, 7’49”, Jessica Silverman Gallery
Florian Meisenberg, You are certainly entitled to this opinion, 2014, 7’40”, Wentrup
Leo Gabin, Oh Baby, 2013, 2’49”, Elizabeth Dee, Peres Projects
CAR (Conceptual Artists Research/Michelle Grabner) and David Robbins, Appleton East High School Band, 1999, 1’33”, James Cohan Gallery
Clunie Reid, Wet Dave (boom boom), 2009, 5’34”, MOT International
Saya Woolfalk, Chimera, 2013, 2’49”, Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects
Jayson Musson, Art Thoughtz with Hennessy Youngman: Beuys-Z, 2011, 5’11”,Salon 94

Wednesday, December 3, 10pm

Ex-Romance
Running time 64′
Charles Atlas has been a pioneering figure in film and video for over four decades, working with some of the most seminal, groundbreaking choreographers of our time, such as Michael Clark and the late Merce Cunningham. In this program, Atlas’s film Ex- Romance (1986) will be paired with a special 2014 Miami-edit of Wipeout XL by Parker Ito, heightening the common ground between the artists’ incongruous interests – from Tarot to foot-fetishes.

Charles Atlas, Ex Romance, 1986, 48’23”, Luhring Augustine
Parker Ito, Wipeout XL (Miami Beach), 2014 15’44”, Courtesy of the artist

Thursday, December 4, 10pm

The Digital Revolutionaries
Running time 67′
Co-curated by the artist Tabor Robak and David Gryn, this program will address the unearthly reverberations of the Internet, gaming, and digital magical-realism. The evening will conclude with a tribute to the seminal filmmaker Harun Farocki, whose work Parallel II (2012) examines the uncanny visual world-making of digital gaming.

Tabor Robak (with music by Fatima Al Qadiri), Vatican Vibes, 2011, 5’16”, team (gallery, inc.)
Jon Rafman, Popova-Lissitzky Office Complex, 2013, 2’10”, Courtesy of the artist and Zach Feuer Gallery
Jon Rafman, Juan Gris Dream House, 2013, 2′, Courtesy of the artist and Zach Feuer Gallery
Tabor Robak, 20XX, 2013, 6’43”, team (gallery, inc.)
Tabor Robak (with music by Gatekeeper), EXO (long version), 2012, 35’45”, team (gallery, inc.)
Oliver Laric, Versions 2012, 2012, 6’17”, Tanya Leighton
Harun Farocki, Parallel II, 2012, 9’, Greene Naftali Gallery, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac

Friday, December 5, 8pm

Radio Ga Ga
Running time 62′
Radio broadcasting – the audible transmission of information through radio waves – is a powerful medium that has long influenced human events. Concepts of radio and waves will be explored in this program, bookended by works that draw from broadcasts that go unnoticed, such as Bill Balaskas’ cobbled together news bulletins and Susan Hiller’s translations of radio frequencies emitted by the Big Bang.

Bill Balaskas, Info, 2011, 4’30”, Kalfayan Galleries
Frank Heath, Invasive Species, 2012, 11’30”, Simone Subal Gallery
Wagner Malta Tavares, Ondas Curtas, 2013, 8’52”, Galeria Marilia Razuk
Vartan Avakian, ShortWave / LongWave, 2009, 7’13”, Kalfayan Galleries
Susan Hiller, Resounding (Infrared), 2014, 30′, Timothy Taylor Gallery

Friday, December 5, 9pm

The Night of Forevermore

Running time 65′
The Night of Forevermore focuses on artists who employ cinematic and theatrical tropes: Ciprian Mureşan reconsiders Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí’s Surrealist classic Un Chien Andalou (1929) through the blockbuster animation Shrek (2001), while Jose Dávila applies his signature cutout method to Sergio Leone’s classic Spaghetti Western The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966).

Ciprian Mureşan, Un chien andalou, 2004, 51”, David Nolan Gallery
Tomislav Gotovac, Feeling 4, 2000, 3′, Alexander Gray Associates, galerie frank elbaz
Olaf Breuning, The Apple, 2006, 11’05”, Metro Pictures
Jose Dávila, The Stranger, the Stranger, and the Stranger, 2014, 2’56”, Galería OMR
Laure Prouvost, OWT, 2007, 3’20”, MOT International
Maya Watanabe, A-PHAN-OUSIA, 2008, 4’45”, 80m2 Livia Benavides
Tim Davis, La La Traviata, 2013, 12’05”, Van Doren Waxter
Marnie Weber, The Night of Forevermore, 2012, 14’45”, Simon Lee Gallery
Hans Op de Beeck, Parade, 2012, 11’25”, Galleria Continua
Alex Prager, Sunday, 2010, 1’08”, Lehmann Maupin

Saturday, December 6, 8pm

Rites of Spring
Running time 62′
From historical positions, such as Babette Mangolte’s 1978 collaboration with dancer Trisha Brown, to recent works such as Rashaad Newsome’s 2014 KNOT, this program will explore the radical implications of dance. Both Miami-based artist Dara Friedman and the Canadian-born Marcel Dzama were inspired by historical dance pieces: Igor Stravinsky’s ballet Rites of Spring and Oskar Schlemmer’s Triadic Ballet. Five short animations by the young Greek artist Rania Bellou will punctuate the screenings.

Rania Bellou, Punctuated Hi/stories, 2014, 2’58”, Kalfayan Galleries
Dara Friedman, Rite, 2014, 4’10”, Gavin Brown’s enterprise
Pilar Albarracín, Musical Dancing Spanish Doll, 2013, 3’25”, Galerie Georges-Philippe & Nathalie Vallois
Rania Bellou, Exercising Catching an Apple, 2008, 12”, Kalfayan Galleries
Marcel Dzama, A Game of Chess, 2011, 14’02”, Sies + Höke, David Zwirner
Ana Roldán, Construction concerned with the relationship between dissimilar emotional values in a composition with black and white, 2008, 2’12”, Instituto de visión
Rania Bellou, Tight Rope / Prison Privacy, 2008, 39”, Kalfayan Galleries
Brian Bress, Rock Your Body, 2005, 4’45”, Cherry and Martin
Rashaad Newsome, KNOT, 2014, 4′, Marlborough Gallery
Rania Bellou, Flying Go Around, 2011, 21”, Kalfayan Galleries
Dara Friedman, Ishmael and the Well of Ancient Mysteries, 2014, 12’, Gavin Brown’s enterprise
Babette Mangolte, Trisha Brown WATER MOTOR, 1978, 7’55”, Broadway 1602, Sikkema Jenkins & Co.
Rania Bellou, Trampoline / The Objectivity of Unprejudiced Witness, 2011, 22”, Kalfayan Galleries
Liu Chuang, Untitled (Dancing Partners), 5’14”, 2010, Salon 94

Saturday, December 6, 9pm

The Magic of Things
Running time 70′
This program is inspired by and will feature Mark Wallinger’s The Magic of Things (2010), a video of edited scenes from the popular 1970s TV sitcom Bewitched, in which everyday objects such as knives or glasses are magically moved by the good witch Samantha. Films with a similarly playful approach will be presented, interspersed with hand-drawn animations from the Japanese artist Atsushi Kaga.

Atsushi Kaga, Hole 1, 2007, 42”, mother’s tankstation
David Shrigley, Ones, 2009, 2’24”, Stephen Friedman Gallery
Brian Alfred, Under Thunder and Fluorescent Lights, 2014, 3′, Ameringer/McEnery/Yohe
Atsushi Kaga, Hole 2, 2007, 28”, mother’s tankstation
Hiraki Sawa, Hako, 2006, 4′, James Cohan Gallery
Takeshi Murata, OM Rider, 2013, 11’39”, Salon 94, Ratio 3
Atsushi Kaga, Hole 3, 2007, 28”, mother’s tankstation
Robin Rhode, Paper Planes, 2009, 2’40”, Lehmann Maupin
Theo Michael, The Splendour of the Heavens, 2008, 10′, Galería OMR
David Shrigley, The Artist, 2012, 2’24”, Stephen Friedman Gallery
Hiraki Sawa, Migration, 2003, 6′, James Cohan Gallery
Mark Wallinger, The Magic of Things, 2010, 10’32”, Galerie Krinzinger
Atsushi Kaga, Hole 4, 2007, 31”, mother’s tankstation
Cécile B. Evans, The Brightness, 2014, 4’48’’, Courtesy of the artist
Brent Green, To Many Men Strange Fates Are Given, 2011-2012, 10’15”, Andrew Edlin Gallery
Atsushi Kaga, Hole 5, 2007, 41”, mother’s tankstation

 FILM TRAILER

David Gryn

David Gryn is the founder and director of London’s Artprojx, screening, curating, promoting and lecturing on artists’ moving image and other art projects, working with leading contemporary artists, art galleries, museums, art fairs, art schools and charities worldwide.

contact:

David Gryn

+447711127848

artprojx@gmail.com

http://instagram.com/davidgryn

https://davidgryn.wordpress.com

skype: Artprojx