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Archive for the ‘London’ Category

The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin

In Art Night, Art NIght London, Dancer, Film, Gryn, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, John Snijders, London, Marriot, Nijinsky, Poppy Bowers, Uncategorized, Video on 16/10/2018 at 2:33 pm
The Nijinsky project – installation assemblage pieces:
1933 bio Nijinsky by Romona Nijinsky, cloth, acrylic, porcelain, wood, steel
IMG_5446

Romola’s love

work by Jane Bustin

Relentless Hatred

work by Jane Bustin

Dark Moods

work by Jane Bustin

Hothouse plants

photo 1

Misfortunes

The Nijinsky project – Faun

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Premiered for Artnight London 2018 at London County Hall, Southbank London

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Jane Bustin
Isaac Gryn 
John Snijders
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Installation and performance – Vimeo 
Highlights – Vimeo
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Duration:
13 minutes.
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Introduction by Poppy Bowers
In 1912, Ballet Russes premiered L’Après-midi d’un Faune at Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris. Eschewing lyrical movement in favour of geometric shapes, its avant-garde choreography and sexually explicit content divided audiences, prompting both outrage and awe. The performance, now regarded as the first modernist ballet, was choreographed and performed by Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950), senior dancer of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes, and also his lover.
An iconic dancer, Nijinsky was experimental in his combination of great technical skill with deep, sensual expression. Over recent years, the artist Jane Bustin has made work in response to Nijinsky’s extraordinary formal experimentation. Like Nijinsky, Bustin is concerned with locating emotion within the restrained forms of geometric abstraction. Her pared-down paintings juxtapose panels of oil paint alongside tactile media such as porcelain, silk, copper or latex, to give sensory understanding to historical subject matter.
Faun is a new collaborative work that pays homage to Nijinsky’s tumultuous life. The work comprises of three parts; six table-mounted assemblages made by Bustin, a musical score by composer John Snijders and a balletic performance by the young dancer Isaac Gryn. The table works create a conceptual and spatial framework for the performative components, taking as its starting point a published book of Nijinsky’s life.
Following his ascendency as one who heralded the era of modern ballet, Nijinsky met misfortune. Having secretly married a young dancer, Romola, a furious Diaghilev subsequently expelled him from the Ballet Russes. Failing to recover from the artistic and financial loss of Diaghilev’s patronage, Nijinsky was forced to abandon dance. Suffering from psychosis he spent his remaining years residing in and out of asylums, until his death in Surrey, England. The account of his success and decline is recited in Nijinsky’s biography written by Romola and published in 1933, a single copy of which forms the centrepiece of each table assemblage.
Each book is accompanied by monochrome panels of various media including cloth, porcelain, paint and wood, the fragility of which point to emotionally-sensitive moments in Nijinsky’s life. From tallest to shortest, the tables take the following titles from a chance finding of a 1933 newspaper review that chart Nijinsky’s psychological trauma; Hothouse Plants, Relentless Hatred, Dark Moods, Misfortunes, “I am an Artist” and Romola’s Love. Typical of Bustin’s work, the proportions of the tables relate to the scale of the human body. Here, the table heights correspond to particular ballet movements measured from the young male dancer’s body, who is the artist’s son.
John Snijder’s musical score, titled Afternoon, was created specifically for this project. It reworks the piano piece of the original orchestral work for L’Après-midi d’un Faune composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), employing chance operations to unravel its structural order. Developed in dialogue between Bustin and Gryn, with support from Matthew Paluch and Dance Research Studio, a 13-minute dance, made in response to the music, is performed within the parameters of the tables. Combining symmetrical formations with lessening control, Gryn’s movements mirror the untangled composure of the accompanying piano, revealing an intimacy of inner tenderness and anxiety, rather than athletic display.
Contrasting sculptural materials with a temporal performative presence, Faun grapples with the troubled pursuit for artistic perfection and speaks of the psychological vulnerability that is bound up in such ambition.
Poppy Bowers, Exhibitions Curator at the Whitworth, The University of Manchester
.
John Snijders ‘Afternoon’ 2018
The composition “Afternoon” was created especially for the Nijinsky Project – Faun. I took, as base material, the piano reduction made by Leonard Borwick in 1914 of the orchestral work “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune”, composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918) in 1894. For “Afternoon” I have divided the piece into twelve sections, and chose one or two representative bars from each section. These bars were paired so that the piece now contains six structural parts, which do not always follow the original’s chronology. The order of the bars, repeated over and over again, was determined using chance operations. Arriving at a final basic structure, more chance operations were used to determine, bar by bar, if, and if yes, how many notes would be altered, going either up or down in pitch, but not altering the rhythm of the bars. This results in the material remaining recognisable, but slowly deteriorating and getting out of focus until the start of the next section, where the process will start all over again. The six parts relate to the six tables with Jane’s artworks, and the musical process mirrors Nijinsky’s slow descent into developing a more and more distorted mind.
John Snijders, Artistic Director of the Ives Ensemble, Associate Professor in Music Performance at Durham University.
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Jane Bustin, artist, lives and works in London and is represented by:
Copperfield London.
&
Fox Jensen Sydney & Fox Jensen McCrory Auckland

The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin – Art Night London at the Marriot, London County Hall – July 7

In Art Night, Art NIght London, Dancer, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, John Snijders, London, Marriot, Nijinsky, Uncategorized on 29/06/2018 at 12:44 pm
faun landscape1 copy
The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin. 
 
Art Night London 7 July 2018
An Installation and Performance featuring dancer, Isaac Gryn & pianist and composer, John Snijders.
Book your Free place here
 
The Nijinsky project – Faun
Saturday 7 July 2018

Installation and performance 

Artist: Jane Bustin
Dancer:  Isaac Gryn
Pianist: John Snijders
Music:  Afternoon, variation of Debussy’s “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune” by John Snijders

at

King George V Room
Marriott Hotel
London County Hall

Westminster Bridge Road
Southbank
London SE1 7BP

Performances: 
6.30pm, 7.30pm, 8.30pm
Duration: 13 minutes

Introduction by Poppy Bowers
In 1912, Ballet Russes premiered L’Après-midi d’un Faune at Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris. Eschewing lyrical movement in favour of geometric shapes, its avant-garde choreography and sexually explicit content divided audiences, prompting both outrage and awe. The performance, now regarded as the first modernist ballet, was choreographed and performed by Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950), senior dancer of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes, and also his lover.
An iconic dancer, Nijinsky was experimental in his combination of great technical skill with deep, sensual expression. Over recent years, the artist Jane Bustin has made work in response to Nijinsky’s extraordinary formal experimentation. Like Nijinsky, Bustin is concerned with locating emotion within the restrained forms of geometric abstraction. Her pared-down paintings juxtapose panels of oil paint alongside tactile media such as porcelain, silk, copper or latex, to give sensory understanding to historical subject matter.
Faun is a new collaborative work that pays homage to Nijinsky’s tumultuous life. The work comprises of three parts; six table-mounted assemblages made by Bustin, a musical score by composer John Snijders and a balletic performance by the young dancer Isaac Gryn. The table works create a conceptual and spatial framework for the performative components, taking as its starting point a published book of Nijinsky’s life.
Following his ascendency as one who heralded the era of modern ballet, Nijinsky met misfortune. Having secretly married a young dancer, Romola, a furious Diaghilev subsequently expelled him from the Ballet Russes. Failing to recover from the artistic and financial loss of Diaghilev’s patronage, Nijinsky was forced to abandon dance. Suffering from psychosis he spent his remaining years residing in and out of asylums, until his death in Surrey, England. The account of his success and decline is recited in Nijinsky’s biography written by Romola and published in 1933, a single copy of which forms the centrepiece of each table assemblage.
Each book is accompanied by monochrome panels of various media including cloth, porcelain, paint and wood, the fragility of which point to emotionally-sensitive moments in Nijinsky’s life. From tallest to shortest, the tables take the following titles from a chance finding of a 1933 newspaper review that chart Nijinsky’s psychological trauma; Hothouse Plants, Relentless Hatred, Dark Moods, Misfortunes, “I am an Artist” and Romola’s Love. Typical of Bustin’s work, the proportions of the tables relate to the scale of the human body. Here, the table heights correspond to particular ballet movements measured from the young male dancer’s body, who is the artist’s son.
John Snijder’s musical score, titled Afternoon, was created specifically for this project. It reworks the piano piece of the original orchestral work for L’Après-midi d’un Faune composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), employing chance operations to unravel its structural order. Developed in dialogue between Bustin and Gryn, with support from Matthew Paluch and Dance Research Studio, a 13-minute dance, made in response to the music, is performed within the parameters of the tables. Combining symmetrical formations with lessening control, Gryn’s movements mirror the untangled composure of the accompanying piano, revealing an intimacy of inner tenderness and anxiety, rather than athletic display.
Contrasting sculptural materials with a temporal performative presence, Faun grapples with the troubled pursuit for artistic perfection and speaks of the psychological vulnerability that is bound up in such ambition.
Poppy Bowers, Exhibitions Curator at the Whitworth, The University of Manchester

John Snijders ‘Afternoon’ 2018
The composition “Afternoon” was created especially for the Nijinsky Project – Faun. I took, as base material, the piano reduction made by Leonard Borwick in 1914 of the orchestral work “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune”, composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918) in 1894. For “Afternoon” I have divided the piece into twelve sections, and chose one or two representative bars from each section. These bars were paired so that the piece now contains six structural parts, which do not always follow the original’s chronology. The order of the bars, repeated over and over again, was determined using chance operations. Arriving at a final basic structure, more chance operations were used to determine, bar by bar, if, and if yes, how many notes would be altered, going either up or down in pitch, but not altering the rhythm of the bars. This results in the material remaining recognisable, but slowly deteriorating and getting out of focus until the start of the next section, where the process will start all over again. The six parts relate to the six tables with Jane’s artworks, and the musical process mirrors Nijinsky’s slow descent into developing a more and more distorted mind. 
John Snijders, Artistic Director of the Ives Ensemble, Associate Professor in Music Performance at Durham University.

Jane Bustin, artist, lives and works in London and is represented by Copperfield London
http://www.copperfieldgallery.com/

With special thanks to: Aida Bañeres Argilés, Poppy Bowers, Richard Grimes, Isaac Gryn, Jacky Lansey – Dance Research Studio, Will Lunn, Morley College – Ceramics Dept, Matthew Paluch, Aina Pomar – Copperfield London, Zarina Rossheart – Art Night London, Thornhill Pianos, John Snijders

Jane Bustin – Rehearsal review in Saturation Point

In Copperfield, Jane Bustin, Laurence Noga, London, Nijinsky, Saturation Point, Uncategorized on 13/05/2016 at 12:25 pm

Jane Bustin: Rehearsal at Copperfield Gallery, London

16 March – 20 May 2016

A review by Laurence Noga

http://www.saturationpoint.org.uk/

“The systems approach is compatible with the evidence that human decisions are largely based on an intuitive feeling of rightness – Rechtsgefuhl – but seeks to validate this subjective feeling by a massive information input, which stands in true correspondence with reality before being refracted through the unconscious.” Jeffrey Steele (Systems, Arts Council 1972-3)

Jane Bustin’s material approaches allow an open system, without a hierarchy. They include: fresco techniques; oil-washed aluminium; acrylic panel painting with ceramic glazes; mirrored copper with latex; polyurethane; wood; copper; silk; paper; gesso; ceramics and ready-made objects

Together, the artist’s relaxed sense of geometry evident in her idiosyncratic solo exhibition, Rehearsal, at the Copperfield Gallery, her sense of rhythm, and her distinctive handling of material through assembly and editing, effect a powerful coercion on her audience.

Bustin works with a highly fragile phenomenology in her expanded approach to painting. This sense of ‘memorial’ is interwoven with techniques that are always meaningful, and which bring together a systematic emphasis on materiality with an intuitive proportional balance. Like Donald Judd, Bustin uses pairs as a single work. She is prepared to generate, or test, arbitrary oppositions in her approach to symmetry and asymmetry, combined with her technical virtuosity in surface facture. With Bustin the relationship between the artist and the object is always equal.

Jane Bustin: Faun, acrylic, polyurethane, copper pins, balsa wood, 50cm x 100cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

The influence of the Russian ballet star Vaslav Nijinsky (1890 – 1950) underpins her decisions here, as a dancer who exceeded the limits of traditional ballet. But this is a show with a more personal edge, not only because works like Faun (2015) are hung at the same height as Bustin’s son, who is also a dancer, but through her ongoing correspondence with the painter Jeffrey Steele. That conversation, in its lucidity and recognition of significant concrete events, combined with an understanding of the intimacy of human relationships (expressed in writers like Proust) casts a spell over the exhibition.

Jane Bustin: Spectre, acrylic, oil, wood, aluminium, 30cm x 35cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

Research, collaboration, and correspondence all seem to have equal weight in Bustin’s vivid shorthand of privacy and illusion. In her work Spectre (2015), Bustin’s line of enquiry synchronises the different surface qualities. She uses two adjoining panels to register an apparition with unequal time value. The painting’s assembly and colour decisions disturb that passage of time, allowing the colour, and its spatial depth, to register in the viewer’s subconscious. The side of this work interacts with the spectator, flickering enough colour peripherally to be visible as you view the front of the work. This phosphorescence attracts your curiosity, makes you look at the sides with equal scrutiny. The small deep red rectangle at the bottom corner of the Prussian/Ultramarine blue panel has an intense registration, played off the frontal white rectangle.

The manipulation of this structure calls to mind the relief constructions of Victor Pasmore, where the painted wood and plastic (e.g. Relief Construction in White, Black and Indian Red, 1961) is handled in an instinctive manner. I get right down underneath this picture to investigate the stained surface of the red /silver panel, but it’s the light green/red lines painted down its side, with a minute red rectangle at its base, which creates that relationship between form and substance.

Jane Bustin, Nijinsky’s Window, oil, acrylic, aluminium, porcelain, oxides, 30cm x 28cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

In one of Bustin’s conversations with Steele in 2014 they talked specifically about Proust’s Remembrance of Things Past. That sense of insight feels embedded into Bustin’s operations and assemblage. Nijinsky’s Window (2015), 30 x 28 cm, oil, acrylic, aluminium, porcelain, oxides, has a bodily emphasis in the handling of the surface facture, but the power and strength of the dancer feels unbalanced, perhaps alluding to Nijinsky’s social awkwardness. The thin, slightly inflated porcelain ceramic feels torn and dysfunctional, hinting at Nijinsky’s fragile mental health just after the First World War. The in-between space has the most concentrated red/gold oxide colour which filters out into the continuous undulating surface, echoing Morris Louis’ veiled paintings such as Mem (1959), allowing the same sense of diffusion and enveloping of the viewer in the same moment.

wpd0896f1f_05_06.jpg

Jane Bustin, Rehearsal II, copper, acrylic, oxides, cloth, 80cm x 50cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

Rehearsal II (2015) is strategically persistent in its placement; the mirrored copper surface nags at our self-consciousness. This encounter catches the viewer off guard, stretching the neck adjusting their position. Nijinsky, in his score for L’Après-midi d’un faune, talks about this inclination of the head, a slight forward tilt. With Bustin we get the history (Robert Morris or Judd a reflection of polished metal) but we also experience the exhibition space or the rehearsal space. The cloths hung next to the work further extend the colour source. They pick up on the opaque colour used in tonal shifts on the side of the work. The cloths themselves are important to a more philosophical sense of system.

Jane Bustin, Nijinsky I, overall, acrylic, thule, polyurethane, wood, 28cm x 44cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

In the symmetrical work Nijinsky I , (2015) the use of opacity and transparency introduces real and virtual depth, with an internal compositional relationship. The work is sensual, psychologically charged. Bustin states that the materials include ‘thule’; this is a term used in medieval geography to denote an unknown place, beyond the borders of the known world. The light and its illusionism connect to a feeling of unreality. You start to notice the small white ceramic cloth, its connotations shifting the balance of the show, reminding me of the work of Joseph Beuys with his interest in different substances, and how they could be explored through spirituality and ecstasy.

Jane Bustin, Rose, Copper, oil acrylic, polyurethane. 30cm x 42cm, 2016. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

Rose (2015) draws our attention further towards the problems of construction. This work seems to have the greatest sense of a machine aesthetic. By this I mean that it impacts on the viewer through a sense of co-existence. Its visual power echoes both the machinery of the dancer, and the industrial impulse that drives the language of precision.

Nijinsky, like Steele, was a revolutionary. His use of symmetry and ‘sensual expression’ questioned the role of choreography, to the point where he became paranoid, even frightened of the other dancers in his company. Bustin explores this sense of vulnerability and subversive attitude by making her works objects of desire. Through a kind of dematerialisation, she invites recognition of the perceptual/ psychological/physical. The whole installation adds this extra dimension through a sensation of sound and movement. Its undulation and acceleration is dependent not only on the notion of sequence, but in its very intimate exploration of symmetry and resonance.

The strength of the show is its ability to engage us in a series of relationships which push the viewer towards a systematic/ syntagmatic order. That system has an elaborate complexity in which the conversation between language, literature, linguistics and logic combine. There is an inherent chain of reaction, which unwraps, for the spectator, a dialogue between concept and object. This multi-layered synthesis of art and life is backed up by Bustin’s understanding of a semiological approach, in which she is able simultaneously to induce a memorable sensation with a combination of generative and emotional processes in the real space.


The exhibition runs weekly, Wednesday – Saturday, 12 – 6pm until 20 May, 2016

©Copyright Patrick Morrissey and Clive Hancock.  All rights reserved.

Daata Editions at Super Woofer featuring Matt Copson 

In artists, Daata, Daata Editions, Gallery, London, Matt's Gallery, Mile End, Super Wofer, X Marks the Bokship on 28/07/2015 at 9:22 am
matt-copson-broadcast_1

Matt Copson, Broadcast (2015)

Daata Editions presents

Moralise the Masses, a new performance by Matt Copson

Curated by Dani Papadimitrou

at 

Super Woofer sound fair at X Marks the Bökship at Matt’s Gallery

Daata Editions is featuring at Super Woofer, a one-day sound fair, organised by X Marks the Bökship at Matt’s Gallery, London. Focussing on the Daata Editions Sound section artists that include Ilit Azoulay, Matt Copson, Leo Gabin, Lina Lapelyte, Hannah Perry, Stephen Vitiello, Daata Editions presents Moralise the Masses, a new performance by Matt Copson.

Moralise the Masses features Reynard Incarnate, Matt’s fox alter-ego, with a live monologue and musical accompaniment by Alex White and Mark William. Expect lascivious sax and lots of shouting.

Super Woofer sound fair has invited artists and audio publishers to have stalls for selling and displaying analogue and digital audio works, including: Keith Harrison, Plastique Fanstastique, Benedict Drew, Marcia Farquhar, Leo Chadburn, Mikatsiu, John Lawrence, Daniela Cascella, Robert Pratt, Cesura // Acceso, Erinyes, Flange Zoo, 38b, Exploit.zzxjoanw.Gen, Girolamo Marri, Drawing Room Confessions, Sonic Imperfections, Trestle Records, Matt’s Gallery, Consumer Waste, Editions of You, Top Nice, DISFIGMENT/BANKRUPSEA, The Cast of the Crystal Set, Dancehall, Sinkhole, Lost Toy Records, WE.

Fair date & hours:

August 1, 2015

1 – 8pm

Matt Copson performance: 5pm

Location:

X Marks the Bökship

Matt’s Gallery 42 – 44 Copperfield Road, Mile End, London E3 4RR

More information: www.bokship.org

The London Open 2015 at the Whitechapel Gallery

In abstraction, artists, East End, Jane Bustin, London, LondonOpen2015, Minimal, painting, The London Open, Whitechapel Gallery on 11/07/2015 at 9:13 am
Nijinsky's Window, 2015 by Jane Bustin

Nijinsky’s Window, 2015 by Jane Bustin

The London Open 2015

Whitechapel Gallery

15 Jul – 6 Sep 2015

The London Open 2015 is the Whitechapel Gallery’s triennial exhibition. Sculpture, painting, performance, moving image, photography, printmaking and many other media and practices, showcase some of the most dynamic work being made across the capital in 2015.

Artists: Rebecca Ackroyd, Holly Antrum, Ryuji Araki, Salvatore Arancio, Zehra Arslan, Alex Baczynski-Jenkins, Sam Belinfante, Karl Bielik, Isha Bohling, Jane Bustin, Jodie Carey, Ben Cove, Sam Curtis, Nelmarie Du Preez, Alexander Duncan, Tim Ellis, Adham Faramawy, Gaia Fugazza, Marco Godoy, Lothar Götz, Athene Greig, Buster Grimes, Mark Harris, Emma Hart, Dominic Hawgood, Mary Hurrell, Lucy Joyce, Dominic Kennedy, Sophie Mackfall, Damian Meade, Guy Patton, The Grantchester Pottery, Heather Power, Mary Ramsden, Sarah Roberts, Julie Roch-Cuerrier, Mitra Saboury, Lizi Sanchez, Laura Santamaria, Frances Scott, Eva Stenram, Tim Stoner, Roy Voss, Caroline Walker, Dominic Watson, Demelza Watts, Ben Woodeson, Madalina Zaharia.

From a record number of 2,133 applicants, these 48 artists were selected by a panel of art world figures, including writer and critic Ben Luke, artist Angela de la Cruz, collector Nicoletta Fiorucci, The Approach gallerist Jake Miller and Whitechapel Gallery curators Daniel Herrmann, Eisler Curator and Head of Curatorial Studies and Poppy Bowers, Assistant Curator.

Whitechapel Gallery

77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Tube: Aldgate East 

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/

T +44 (0)20 7522 7888 

E info@whitechapelgallery.org

Twitter 

Facebook 

The London Open 2015

Galleries 1, 8 & 9

Mon: Closed

Tues, Weds, Fri, Sat, Sun: 11am–6pm

Thurs: 11am–9pm

Other works in The London Open 2015 by Jane Bustin include: Tabitha’s Cape, Nijinsky 1

Jane Bustin currently has artworks in the RA Summer Show and at The Dot Project, 94 Fulham Rd, London

Hercules Rough Cut by David Blandy at Bloomberg SPACE

In Artist, Bloomberg, Daata, Daata Editions, David Blandy, Hercules, London, Moorgate, Moving Image, Video on 10/07/2015 at 3:40 pm

HERC 4

David Blandy 
HERCULES : ROUGH CUT
Bloomberg SPACE
50 Finsbury Square
London EC2A 1HD

Exhibition dates: July 10 – September 19, 2015

Hercules Rough Cut, David Blandy’s new commission for Bloomberg SPACE, explores empire, civilisation, London and language in a hypnotically rotating, mutating installation of video and voice. Sound by Larry Achiampong. Curated by Sigrid Kirk.

More information: http://www.bloombergspace.com

David Blandy has artworks now available at Daata Editions http://daata-editions.com

The Miami and Moscow Film Selections – Artist Sound of Film – 12 Sept at Bermondsey Project

In Art, Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, Bermondsey, Cory Arcangel, Dara Birnbaum, Dara Friedman, David Gryn, Film, Kota Ezawa, Lina Lapelyte, London, Martin Creed, Max Reinhardt., Miami Beach, Nick Abrahams, Nicola Thomas, Philip Miller, Rashaad Newsome, Ryan McGinley, Salon 94, Sigur Ros, Takeshi Murata, Tannery, Theaster Gates, William Kentridge on 29/07/2014 at 5:17 pm
Takeshi-Murata-OM-Rider-2013__02_spike-art-quarterly_1

Takeshi Murata – OM Rider 2013 courtesy the artist, Salon 94 and Ratio 3

 

Artprojx presents
The Miami and Moscow Film Selections
Artist Sound of Film
curated by David Gryn

with a Miami Moscow Mix playlist by Max Reinhardt

 

Friday 12 September 8.30pm

Bermondsey Project, 46 Willow Walk, London. SE1 5SF

 

The films selected are highlights of works that were originally selected and curated by David Gryn for the Film programme at Art Basel in Miami Beach over the last 4 years. The films were all played on the New World Symphony Center’s screening wall in Soundscape Park during the annual art fair. This selection was played outdoors in Moscow as part of the Museum Nights in May 2014 along with DJ Max Reinhardt.

These works all engage with music, rhythm and sound and remain resonant from their initial playing. They all have a power that is far beyond just the work, one that creates lingering memory with the viewer long after the work has been seen and finished. The selection of these was driven by their sound, engagement and that the language needed to digest these works is that of audio-visual. These works reflect on the current trends and modes of communication such as YouTube, TV, animation, gaming, social media and used to create new images, sounds and unexpected connections.

Nick Abrahams – ekki mukk, 2012, 10’30”
Cory Arcangel – Paganini Caprice No.5, 2011, 3’41”
Dara Birnbaum – Arabesque, 2011/2013, 6’37”
Pierre Bismuth – Following Elvis Presley’s Hands in Jailhouse Rock, 2011, 3’12”
Martin Creed – Work No. 1700, 2013
Nathalie Djurberg with Hans Berg – I wasn’t made to play the son, 2011, 6’27”
Kota Ezawa – Beatles Über California, 2010, 2’03”
Dara Friedman – RITE 2012
Leo Gabin – Stackin, 2010, 2’38”
Rashaad Newsome – The Conductor, 2005/2010, 6’18”
Theaster Gates – Breathing, 2010, 6’58”
William Kentridge with Philip Miller – Tango for Page Turning, 2013, 2’48”
Lina Lapelyte – Candy Shop, 2014
Ari Marcopoulous – Detroit, 2010, 7’32”
Ryan McGinley – Varúð, 2012, 8′
Takeshi Murata with Robert Beatty – OM Rider, 2013, 11’39”
Laurel Nakadate – 51/50, 2009, 3’09”
Nicola Thomas – Dancing with Monk, 2013, 2’55″

photo 2-1

Max Reinhardt and David Gryn in Moscow 2014

A Miami-Moscow playlist mix for Bermondsey Project by Max Reinhardt, dj/musician/broadcaster (Late Junction BBC Radio 3). Collaborating with David Gryn and Artprojx, Max created a soundscape for the Film programme at Art Basel in Miami Beach in 2013 (at the New World Center)and played a DJ set complimenting the David Gryn curated Film programme in Moscow earlier this year. Music by artists Rashaad Newsome, Lina Lapelyte, Larry Achiampong and traces of Miami and Moscow feature in the mix.

Artprojx, founded and directed by David Gryn, screens, curates and promotes artists’ moving image and sound, working with leading contemporary art galleries, museums, art fairs and artists worldwide.

For more information on the artists and other things related contact:
David Gryn, Artprojx – david@artprojx.com +447711127848

http://www.artprojx.com
https://davidgryn.wordpress.com

Part of the Bermondsey Project closing celebrations: http://bermondseyproject.com/future-exhibitions

Jane Bustin and Lina Lapelyte at Austin Forum, Hammersmith

In Artprojx, Artsy, Artupdate, Austin Forum, Duro Oluwu, FAD, GalleriesNow, Jane Bustin, Laurie Simmons, Lina Lapelyte, London, Salon 94 on 26/06/2014 at 7:52 am

 

photo

Christina the Astonishing VI – Jane Bustin, 2014

The Astonishing by Jane Bustin

&

Where are you ? by Lina Lapelyte, a sound work

at

Austin Forum, 55 Fulham Palace Road, London W6 8AU

The Austin Forum’s subterranean, double-height space, is located in the Augustinian Centre, behind St. Augustine’s Church and Priory,

Exhibition dates: 27 June – 11 July 2014. Tuesday-Sunday 11am to 7pm, Monday by appointment.

Contact: David Gryn: david@artprojx.com +447711127848

LINKS:

http://www.janebustin.com   

http://www.lapelyte.com   

http://www.austin-forum.org

https://davidgryn.wordpress.com

http://www.artprojx.com

https://artsy.net/artprojx-cinema/posts

https://www.dropbox.com/s/vfsbsrdvxgermea/VID_20140626_195008.mp4

Also

Jane Bustin in More Material curated by Duro Oluwu at Salon 94 BOwery

Jane Bustin in More Material curated by Duro Oluwu at Salon 94 Bowery

More Material at Salon 94, Bowery in New York, curated by Duro Oluwu. June 26 until Aug 1

A group show featuring work by: Caroline Achaintre, Sylvie Auvray, Zoe Bedeaux, Amy Bessone, Josh Blackwell, Jane Bustin, Alexander Calder, Nick Cave, Kate Daudy, Sarah De Teliga, Estate of Jimmy DeSana, Francesca DiMattio, Rachel Feinstein, Sylvie Franquet, Theaster Gates, Paula Greif, Hassan Hajjaj, Matthias Merkel Hess, Barkley Hendricks, Cyrus Kabiru, Sandy Kim, Kueng Caputo, Ajay Kurian, Takuro Kuwata, Claude and Francois Lalanne, Glenn Ligon, Antonio Lopez, Studio Lumiere, Carrie Mae Weems, Man Ray, Helen Marden, Sam McEwen, Marilyn Minter, Takeshi Miyakawa, Estate of Carlo Mollino, Tommaso Corvi Mora, Rick Owens, Antonio Pippolini, Michael Roberts, Cindy Sherman, Malik Sidibe, Amy Sillman, Lorna Simpson, Laurie Simmons, Alessandra Spranzi, Juergen Teller, Stanley Whitney, Madame Yevonde, and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.

http://www.salon94.com/exhibitions/detail/more-material

And some great listings …

Artupdate http://artupdate.com/en/

GalleriesNow http://www.galleriesnow.net/shows/nick-abrahams-lions-tigers-bears/

FAD http://www.fadwebsite.com/2014/06/23/art-events-to-visit-this-week-23rd-june-29th-june/

Art Map London http://www.artmaplondon.co.uk/

lina in moscow

Artprojx screening Candy Shop by Lina Lapelyte in Moscow – May 2014

 

The Astonishing – Jane Bustin and Lina Lapelyte at Austin Forum opening 26 June

In abstract, Art, Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, Austin Forum, David Gryn, Duro Oluwu, Jane Bustin, John Moores Painting Prize, Lina Lapelyte, Liverpool Biennial, London, Royal Academy, Salon 94, Serpentine Gallery, Walker Art Gallery on 16/06/2014 at 9:33 am
three-dimensional work by Jane Bustin

Image: Christina the Astonishing V by Jane Bustin 2014

 

The Astonishing by Jane Bustin

Where are you ? by Lina Lapelyte. A live performance and ensuing sound work

Austin Forum, 55 Fulham Palace Road, Hammersmith, London W6 8AU

Opening evening: 26 June 2014 6-9pm

3 Lina Lapelyte performance through the evening

RSVP events@artprojx.com

Exhibition dates: 27 June – 11 July 2014

Tuesday-Sunday 11am to 7pm, Monday by appointment.

www.janebustin.com www.artprojx.com www.lapelyte.com

 

The Astonishing by Jane Bustin is a series of paintings developed into modernist female icons, a balance of material, colour and structure. There is something strong and resolved in their form, but hints and sides of shadow and fragility in their effect.

The recent series of works ‘Tabitha’ and ‘St Christina the Astonishing’ take their reference from 14th century frescoes, iconography and the stories behind the making of female Saints. Whilst the final painting resembles a formalist abstract construct, the choice of colour, paint and material used, directly reflects the psychological concept of the subject.

The myth of St Christina describes that in order for her to save other peoples souls, she had to take on other peoples suffering by subjecting herself to terrible ordeals such as climbing into burning ovens, falling from treetops only to appear unscathed hence earning the name ‘Christina the Astonishing’. The materials used in the paintings reflect these ideas: the luminous fluorescent and neon acrylic, the depth and longevity of oil paint and the use of copper with its historical healing powers and as a conductor of energies.

Jane Bustin has been in numerous group exhibitions including Kettles Yard Cambridge, Ferens Museum (Hull), Southampton City Art Gallery, Djanogly Gallery (Nottingham), Royal Academy (London), B55 Gallery (Budapest), John Moores Painting Prize 2012 and the Jerwood Drawing Prize 2012/13. Bustin has had solo shows at Testbed 1 (London), The Eagle Gallery (London), Artprojx Space (London) and The British Library (London). Her work is in several collections including V&A Museum (London), Yale Center USA, Ferens Museum (Hull).

Christina the Astonishing 1 is in the John Moores Painting Prize 2014, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool opening 4 July. Two other works in this series are featuring in The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, 2014.

Jane Bustin also features in fashion designer Duro Oluwu’s summer exhibition selection More Material at Salon 94, Bowery in New York 26 June – 1 Aug

Lina Lapelyte: Where Are You? a performance and sound work

Where Are You? a work that involves female bodies and male voices; castrato arias and instrumental drones; Italian texts and English translations. It was first presented at the David Roberts Arts Foundation at Lina’s solo show ‘Everything I Do, I Do it Big’.

Lina Lapelyte is an artist, composer, musician and performer living and working in London and Vilnius. After obtaining the degree in classical Violin in Lithuania, Lina moved to London where she studied Sound Arts and did her MA in Sculpture at the Royal College of Art. In her works such as operas Have a good Day! and Candy Shop she has been exploring the phenomena of song. Using song as an object, Lina examines the issues of displacement, otherness and beauty, re-enactment supports her investigation into aesthetics, control and reality.

Lina is also an active participant of London improvised music scene. Her collaborators include David Toop, Angharad Davies, Anat Ben David and Rhodrie Davies. Recently Lina Lapelyte has been shortlisted for the Arts foundation award and Brian Eno described her practice as ‘working right at the edge of what popular music could become.’ Currently Lina is making a new performance work, which will be presented at the Pavilion Nights, Serpentine Gallery.

Lina Lapelyte has been exhibiting and performing at the David Roberts arts Foundation (London), ICA (London), CAC (Vilnius), CCA (Glasgow), Ikon (Birmingham), BBC proms (London), Tate Modern (London), Skopje Bienalle (Skopje), Queen Elizabeth Hall (London), Spor (Aarhus), Echoraum (Wien), Holland Festival (Amsterdam)

The Space: Austin Forum

Austin Forum provides a project space situated within the community of the Augustinian friars. This context naturally creates a healthy tension and dialogue between the ancient Order’s traditional engagement with meaning and transcendency and the expressions and voices within contemporary art practice.

Austin Forum is a non-profit public space and project. Its aim is to bring people and groups together to engage in culture through visual art, youth work and community projects that explore spirituality and social justice. Our work focuses on creative activity which can invigorate the wider community and help it to reflect freely on the universal questions and profundities of human experience.

The Austin Forum’s subterranean, double-height space, is located in the Augustinian Centre, behind St. Augustine’s Church and Priory, 55 Fulham Palace Road, W6 8AU.

For more information contact: Gianni Notarianni O.S.A: austin-forum@hotmail.com

Contact: David Gryn +447711127848 david@artprojx.com

davidgryn.wordpress.com www.artprojx.com www.janebustin.com

David Gryn notes for LOOP Barcelona on his engagement with the Artists Moving Image World

In Art, Art Basel Miami Beach, Art Fair, Artprojx, Artprojx Cinema, Barcelona, Central Saint Martins, Cinema, David Gryn, Film, Gryn, Jane Bustin, London, LOOP, Miami, Miami Beach, Video Art on 12/06/2014 at 10:21 am

20140612-105757.jpg

 

AN OVERVIEW OF MY ENGAGEMENT WITH

THE ARTISTS MOVING IMAGE WORLD

David Gryn, Founding Director of Artprojx.

Over the last 15 years I have presented major artists projects and screenings of artists’ moving image including during major international art fair periods such as during Frieze, Armory NY, Independent NY, Art Basel in Miami Beach and at LOOP and also working with leading art galleries, artists and institutes around the world, and always thinking about their prospective and potential audience. The logic being that of creating generally cinematic based screening events focusing the attention on the art work and delivering an audience for the projects often at a time when there are always plethoras of other audience demanding events going on. However in our current art climate – the art fair is dominating the art experience landscape and thus the audience, but screenings of artists films are probably one of the only times an audience is truly watching a work or works of art during an art fair period, whilst the main activity in the art fair is mainly focused on the sale of the art work. We have to put the moving image, performance and sound at the heart of the art fair experience to create a perception and a reality of its powerful place in our contemporary art world.

There are ever-more artists making moving image as their focus, part of their practice or even as purely documentation and technologies are making the quality ever-better, far easier and cheaper, the galleries, institutes and art fairs are showing ever-less. The artist moving image, the installation, the live event are a kind of ‘last bastion’ of pure art, where it remains ‘art’, fairly untainted by commercial attributes and demands, it is not easy to sell, own, view or digest easily.

My view is of an egalitarian, enabling, engaging and empowering environment for all parties involved to feel they have a role; artists, galleries, general public, art fairs, collectors, students. This is achieved by venerating and putting the artists and artwork at the centre of the live, public, commercial and digital art experience. Utilizing all platforms for the showing of artists’ work and creating social events and experiences in our digitally focused, time-limited and commercially dominated age. I believe we have to create audiences focused programming that operates with philanthropic and passionate attributes to the showing of moving image art works.

I hear film and often know instinctively whether it is great, good or not. Films like all art works have charismatic characteristics and it is often clear of the author’s voice, ego, charisma coming through based on techniques, sound, tone, visual impact, fonts, titles, which all combine and their chemistry results in the art work and its impact. A great work of art may linger in my head and heart for weeks and sometimes years after viewing it. I am most often lead by the sound of a film and that is what captivates me and can remain trapped in my mind far beyond the actual memory of the moments of watching the film. Film is primarily a visual language, however my memory is activated by the music, sound and the audio sense of what I see. I often distractedly look at films on my computer, but with the detritus of daily life, I look away to do other things and yet a good film will be heard throughout my distractions, as it may have a pace, a melancholy, a tension that keeps my listening focused, in much the same way as a great piece of music may leap out or emerge on the radio from the generally mundane or bland selections.

The world we inhabit is avowedly a human one and the work we do is best served and benefited from when done so with a modicum of love and passion, it is the unaccountable and immeasurable ingredient that we all know is there and vital in so many other walks of life. The art world at its most crassest end is just about business, albeit sometimes done with genuine appreciation and value of it being art, but rarely more than about the shifting of commodities. At the coal-face of the art world – it is not a business, it is a process more akin to love and passion and not commercially quantifiable and the best artists, gallerists, art fairs, collectors all show these traits to some degree. When I do a project showing artists film, I aim to think about the space, the place and the context of the screening and how we can make connections, how does it all relate and interact and how can all parties involved benefit. I am fascinated by the relationship between the makers, the audience, the venue and locality and the spaces in-between, how audience reacts and how we can work together for projects. In brief, my work is joining together all the dots.

My work is often connecting to and collaborating with a screening project, either via the artist or their gallery and to enable an audience to understand directly what they are coming to and that the environment is suited to them sitting for lengthy periods, basically managing expectations where possible and sometimes surprising people too. In brief I see my role as an orchestrator of encouragement for all parties on any given project. This is made simple in the context of the cinema, as they are designed for viewing film, and our now cultural awareness and expectations in these places are durational, to be focused, observational, as well as suspending our reality and allowing fantasy to reign. However, there are always exceptions to rules – and some works are simply made to have fleeting glances at them and thus the looped film rears its complicated head.

I had hoped by now in this decade that the ‘cinema’ would be host to regular artists screenings and that there would have been a box office revolution and we would now be in a nirvana of artists earning money via ticketing or even downloads (akin to music concerts/Hollywood film screenings and online music purchase) and not dependent on ownership, sales and complex public funding. In reality, there is not yet wide and unlimited interest in artists moving image, as it remains a medium that is not mass commercial entertainment, and that is also a really huge relief. Whilst we want the largest number of people to see works we show or make, art as magical rarity, unique and the unfathomable is where much of its value lays. We are living in a wonderful changing world, with our digital revolution in full swing.

Our expectations are ever changing and evolving, our viewing habits are shifting and accommodating new technologies. A recent comment by a leading USA museum director to me was that in the age of Netflix, how can we compete and show film in the museum and still attract an audience? My view is that we have to be more vigilant, inventive and create the right environments for showing this area of artist practice and output.

The future is always going to be changeable – but the fact is that we must engage better with the online experience for viewing of and interacting with art, but that instead of being a mirror to an art world, it has to learn how to make its own world and be seen as true art as any other platform art is shown on or made for.

https://davidgryn.wordpress.com
http://www.artprojx.com
+447711127848