David Gryn blog

Archive for the ‘keren cytter’ Category

Independent Features: Sound and Video Curator David Gryn on Championing Non-Object-Based Art

In Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Elizabeth Dee, Elliot Dodd, Independent, keren cytter, Leo Gabin, Spring, spring place, Uncategorized on 01/03/2018 at 12:26 pm

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For the 2018 edition of Independent New York, sound and video curator David Gryn has programmed a series of artist-created video and sound experiences that will take place throughout the duration of the fair. A collaboration between Independent and Spring Place, the program will feature works by a range of international artists exploring digital mediums, including: Larry Achiampong, Lynda Benglis, BREYER P-ORRIDGE, Keren Cytter, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Laurel Nakadate, Puppies Puppies, Torbjørn Rødland, and Saya Woolfalk.

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Based in London, Gryn has a long history of working with sound, video, and digital media: in 2001, he founded Artprojx, which has collaborated with numerous institutions worldwide to screen and promote artists’ film and video projects. He is now the director Daata Editions, an innovative platform that commissions video, sound, and web-based works, which can be viewed and acquired as digital downloads. Launched in 2015, Daata Editions has since commissioned work by more than 65 artists, and Gryn has forged a path as a tireless champion for bringing sound and video art into the conversation.

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No Panic Baby – Leo Gabin (Peres Projects, Elizabeth Dee, VNH)

“I don’t really see myself as a curator, more as a facilitator,” Gryn says. “What I try to do with any project that I work on is think about how to empower the artist, or the gallery, or the audience in some way.” In conceiving of the sound and video program for Independent, he thought about “how to make the art fair experience work for the artists and the mediums that don’t always get featured at fairs. Often the artworks that I show get left behind because galleries, in the end, are more comfortable showing works that are object based. And it’s been a longstanding commitment of mine to try to make sure that I work with galleries to show artworks that they might not find as easy to put into a booth. It’s vital that mediums that don’t have the same marketplace presence get some kind of strong exposure, so what I try to do is think about how to show them so that they can create a dialogue with the audience and the environment.”

Daata Editions was founded to respond to a similar problem: it came out of a desire “to invest in the artists and in the mediums, to find ways to support them.” According to Gryn, Daata Editions was inspired by “the belief that the art market doesn’t yet know how to handle digital media. After 15 years of working with artists’ film, video, and sound works, I felt there was a need to tackle not only the art market, but the question of how to support and empower artists so that they’re able to keep making these types of works.”

The works selected by Gryn for Independent include both Daata Editions commissions—including the debut of a new work, the six-part video  The Doctor  by London-based artist Elliot Dodd, described as a “meditation on bodily exertion, chemical energy, and disoriented calm” —and works from participating galleries. Gryn’s goal, he says, was to create a “cohesive program” that brings together Independent, Spring Place, and the galleries. For Gryn, it’s important that the program complements rather than competes with the galleries’ presentations: when invited to work with Independent on the sound and video program, “my first reaction was to make sure that the galleries in the fair feel good about what’s being programmed,” he says. “That is vital to my thinking about working with art fairs: how do you make the people who have already been selected to participate in a fair feel included in the other projects that happen around them, because they’re already throwing in so much of their own energies to be there. It’s really important to make sure that the galleries are part of the conversation.”

Independent New York 2018
PRIVATE VIEWING (by invitation):
Thursday, March 8

PUBLIC HOURS:
Friday, March 9: 12–7PM
Saturday, March 10: 12–7PM
Sunday, March 11: 12–6PM

LOCATION: Spring Studios, 50 Varick Street, New York

RELATED LINKS:

Independent and Spring Launch a Program of Artist-Created Audio and Film Installations, Selected by Curator David Gryn

http://www.independenthq.com/news-items/independent-and-spring-launch-a-program-of-artist-created-audio-and-film-installations-selected-by-curator-david-gryn

Independent Features: Sound and Video Curator David Gryn on Championing Non-Object-Based Art

http://www.independenthq.com/features/sound-and-video-curator-david-gryn-on-championing-non-object-based-art

Institute 193 Playlist in the Independent & Spring Video & Sound Program
Curated by David Gryn

193 Playlist includes: Georgiana B. Pettway and Creola B. Pettway, Three Legged Race, Street Gnar, Idiot Glee, The Smacks, Lonnie Holley, Jules Trakker (Resonant Hole), Ben Sollee, Silas House, Matt Duncan, Anna & Elizabeth, Ben Durham and Robert Beatty Jeanne Vomit-Terror, Rayna Gellert, Phillip March Jones, ATTEMPT, Morgan O’Kane Groove, Merchants, Louis Zoellar Bickett II

http://institute193.org/193-sound-at-independent-art-fair

Daata Editions in Festive Cultural Traffic

In Artspace, Cultural Traffic, culturaltraffic, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Festive, juju's bar, keren cytter, old truman brewery, Terrorist of Love, Toby Mott, Uncategorized on 09/12/2016 at 6:42 pm

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Daata in a Festive Mood !

Juju’s Presents: Festive Cultural Traffic

Saturday & Sunday 17-18th December 2016

11am – 8pm Free Entry

Juju’s Bar & Stage

The Old Truman Brewery

London, E1 6QR

Cultural Traffic returns to the Truman Brewery and adjacent Spitalfields Market over the last shopping weekend before Christmas 17-18th December

Festive Cultural Traffic will be offering a broad vivid experience away from the dull predictable mainstream Christmas shopping options. An opportunity to engage with the past present and future of counter culture at an affordable level for that perfect gift.

Cultural Traffic the UK fair for dealers in counter culture, giving independent producers the opportunity to trade books, zines, prints, catalogues, vinyls and tapes in both current and obsolete format.

By bringing together pioneering contemporary publishing with vintage counter culture and out-of-print material, Cultural Traffic paves an express connection between yesterdays cultural artefacts and the latent collectables of tomorrow.

Free and open to all, Cultural Traffic offers the public an opportunity to engage in the past, present, and future of counter culture at an affordable level. And offers vendors the opportunity to capitalise on the amplified busy climate of the last shopping weekend before Christmas.

Cultural Traffic was launched by editor, designer and collector Toby Mott who says: “Cultural Traffic is a fascinating window into the flourishing post-digital zine scene” Mott’s expansive collection of punk ephemera, The Mott Collection has been exhibited widely and his most recent publications are: Oh So Pretty: Punk in Print 1976-80, Phaidon. Showboat: Punk/Sex/Bodies, Dashwood Books and Skinhead: An Archive, Ditto Press.

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EXHIBITERS

Carrie Reichardt, Bob Osborne and Lori Bell

Fanpages

Paul Sakoilsky

Hoxton Mini Press

Morel Books

Niki Best

John Marchant Gallery

Land Fill

Voicing The Void

Design For Today

Walden Press

Batool Showghi

Korero Press

The Erotic Review

L-13 Light Industrial Workshop

Kiki Werth Posters

Disinfotainment

Jo Stockham

Dafydd Jones

The Drugstore Gallery

MAMA Photobooks

Ditto London

Daata Editions

Red Lebanese

Galerie P38

Poptique

Shapiro Modern

The Mott Collection

We Are Willow

Wastamer Press

Quaterduck

Service Industries

Homer Sykes My British Archive

Chalotte Sumner

Wet Satin Press

Grrrl Zine Fair

HYSTERIA

Iain McKell

Polyester

For further info contact;

Culturaltraffic@gmail.com

Culturaltraffic.com

Facebook Event

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Terrorist of Love by Keren Cytter, Available as a FREE DOWNLOAD via Daata X Artspace

David Gryn: Sound and Vision

In Alimantado, Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Art Basel Miami Beach, Art Fair, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Film, keren cytter, Miami, Miami Beach, Uncategorized, Wilhelm Sasnal on 24/11/2016 at 11:50 am

Returning to curate the Art Basel Miami Beach Film program for a sixth year, David Gryn explains why music has inspired his choices, and how audiences can catch a glimpse of the ‘Best Dressed Chicken in Town’.

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Each year, as evening darkens the skies over Art Basel Miami Beach, visitors gather on the lawns of SoundScape Park to experience video works from some of the world’s most exciting artists. Sharing picnics, drinks, or simply being absorbed by art, they sit beneath the towering 7,000 square foot projection wall of the New World Center as it displays a program of films carefully chosen by curator David Gryn.

“My selections are quite instinctive,” says Gryn. “I am often attracted by artworks that affect me like music does; a thud in my chest, reverberations through my body, tingles down my neck and spine.” Fittingly then, music is the theme of this year’s program. “As [the New World Center is] a concert venue, music is inherent to the place we show the work and contextually it has a strong resonance. Asking galleries to submit films which engage with music in some way felt like a natural choice.”

Through this year’s theme, Gryn hopes to create a larger-than-life show to excite and engage the broadest possible audience. “Music is something universal. When you have dialogue in a certain language, you often exclude people outside it. Music, like art, crosses that divide – a sort of abstract language that has its own voice and says something about the human condition.”

Be enveloped by art

The program includes a set of 28 short films screened under the title Best Dressed Chicken in Town. “This was named after the 1970s reggae track by Doctor Alimantado, which has long inspired me. The idea behind it was to combine artworks using music and sound which, over the program’s two hour span, swell to a crescendo,” Gryn explains. And though he will not be drawn on a favorite this year (“I picked them, so they’re all my favorites!”), he singles out Terrorist of Love by Keren Cytter as being a film which never fails to make him smile, while Wilhelm Sasnal’s Kiss is “utterly wonderful.”

In addition to the screening of films, this year also heralds the third edition of Surround Sound, a specially commissioned program of sound works designed to take full advantage of SoundScape Park’s 160 speaker surround sound system. “I view my role as that of a facilitator. I aim to serve the artwork, the artist, and the gallery well by presenting pieces which will have the most resonance with the audience in the setting that we have.”

The communal act of experiencing art in this way is something special, says Gryn. “You get a sense of excitement, something you can palpably feel. You really do see an audience being enveloped by art. That’s what this platform achieves – and it encourages galleries, their artists, and a wider audience to take time with mediums that often don’t get much of a look in at events like this. There’s not another experience quite like it in the context of an art fair. Period.”

 

Taken from an Art Basel Interview https://www.artbasel.com/post/detail/2653

Keren Cytter on Reinventing the Rules of Filmmaking – Artspace interview by Loney Abrams

In Andrew Goldstein, Art Basel, Artspace, Daata Editions, Digital, Frieze, keren cytter, Loney Abrams, Uncategorized, Video on 13/10/2016 at 5:35 pm

 

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Image Still: Keren Cytter, Terrorist of Love, 2016 (a Free Downloadable Artwork – commissioned by Daata Editions and Artspace)

Keren Cytter on Reinventing the Rules of Filmmaking (or, How to Manipulate Your Audience) by Loney Abrams, Artspace.

It’s difficult to speak about Keren Cytter’s oeuvre holistically, only because she’s such a prolific artist that it’s almost impossible to view it all. The Israeli-born, New York-based filmmaker and writer has produced over 60 videos; published seven books that include novels, poetry, and screenplays; and is also the founder of dance company Dance International Europe Now (aka D.I.E. Now.)… and she’s hasn’t even turned 40.

Like Martin Heidegger’s famous hammer, which only reveals its true nature once it breaks or otherwise fails to function, Cytter’s films employ cliché to set up familiar reference points only to break them down—with poorly dubbed dialogue, fragmented or repetitious story-lines, and subtitles that address the viewer, for example­—and reveal the cinematic conventions that are normally invisible to us.

Cytter’s bag of tricks is chock-full of immediately identifiable tropes, from overly dramatized Hollywood mobster and thriller genre films, that have been delivered so adeptly by directors like Francis Ford Coppola, Alfred Hitchcock, and Quentin Tarantino. But Cytter’s use of these devices don’t quite fit—instead, they feel willfully clumsy and absurd. The 2014 video Rose Garden ends as a young boy is shot with a rifle after stealing a disco ball from the kind of timeless Midwestern dive bar you might expect to see in No Country for Old Men. The boy, refereed to by his bartending parents as both “Scott” and “Stock,” had shot his mother a few seconds before for no discernible reason, and the two murders (of which there are four total in the nine-minute-long film) seemed to bear no relation to one another.

Equally disorienting, the film Four Seasons (2009) starts with a shot of blood dripping onto white tile as a wounded man sits in a bathtub with snow falling around him. After the opening credit sequence, a woman enters the bathroom to ask the man to turn his music down, which she can hear from the apartment next door. The man yells twice, “Stella!” (presumably in reference to Marlon Brando‘s oft-parodied line from A Streetcar Named Desire) and the woman replies, “My name is Lucy, man,” before conversation unfolds casually as if nothing is out of the ordinary. Cytter uses clichés like cinematic readymades, using them to piece together disjointed, fragmented, often absurdist narratives. As a viewer, it sometimes feels as if, through her exaggerated use of cinematic conventions, Cytter is reminding us that we’re watching a film.

Humor, some theorists believe, is experienced when a person’s worldview is turned on its head for a split-second, and then revealed to be only temporary, a joke. Cytter’s films are funny—funny in a smart, dry way that challenges the viewer’s relationship to film. In Cytter’s Video Art Manual, the artist illustrates, quite literally, the filmic conventions and cinematic clichés that she subverts in her work.

The video begins with a young man in a suit sitting at a desk addressing the camera: “In this informal presentation I will try to unfold the great mysteries of new medias and reveal the utopian anxieties of the common man.” By then, we can already assume that this won’t be a straightforward educational film by the way the audio inexplicably changes volume mid-sentence, at times becoming unsynchronized with the actor’s lips. This scene segues into the next with a countdown that only goes from “five…” to “four…,” leading into a montage of news footage that introduces a second narrative, an impending cataclysmic solar flare event, that continues to weave in and out of the rest of the film.

Characters preparing for this imminent environmental catastrophe shift between inhabiting their roles as fictional characters and acting as actors who are playing their characters’ parts. We see one actor selling himself during a casting call, though his rehearsed speech makes it obvious that this too is an act. “You’ve got to take me, I’m multitalented. I speak three languages, sprechen sie Deutsch, y hablo Español,” the actor says before spouting off generic textbook Spanish phrases, while a superimposed subtitle reads, “The performers aren’t as concerned with their acting skills as they are representing familiar characters and situations. Subtitles help to distract the viewer from bad acting and visual mistakes.” Cytter’s films may follow some sort of narrative thrust, but the meat of the work’s content can be found on the bones—the form, the structure that is conventionally out of site but is foregrounded for Cytter. We as viewers are as aware of the off-screen editor, the director, the script writer (who are all, of course, Cytter), as we are the actors onscreen.

For an artist making self-reflexive medium-specific work, Cytter sure does work in a number of media. In 2008, Cytter expanded into the world of theater, founding her dance company, D.I.E. Now. Their first production, The True Story of John Webber and His Endless Struggle With the Table of Content was as much Samuel Beckett as it was “Disney on Ice.” Combining dance, video, music (composed by Cytter herself), and spoken text, the artist worked with non-professional performers—a trademark Cytter carried over from her video work. The production was performed at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in London in 2009.

Cytter’s most recent work is yet another departure from her cinematic mainstays. Terrorist of Love, commissioned by Artspace and Daata Editions (and available as a free download here), is a music video, and uses imagery native to the Internet—two firsts for the artist.  Using a fixed 4K camera, Cytter shot the video in one take, before devising an unconventional video format in post-production solely using key framing, meme-like imagery, and an original soundtrack—an unprecedented approach to video-making in any genre. Here, Artspace’s Loney Abrams talks to the artist about making Terrorist of Love, her self-imposed rules of production, addictive Instagram habits, and the artist’s unfulfilled desire to make her audience feel sad.

Terrorist of Love seems to be the first video you’ve made that is soundtrack driven. How did the idea come about?

I hadn’t made anything like this before. I was in Israel and I was visiting my friend who is a musician, and I asked him for songs. He had this one and I decided to work on it. Then I said, “Okay, we can replace him with performers.” So that’s what we did!

Would you consider it a music video?

I’d say it’s a music video, yeah. [Laughs.] I made up a structure to follow: I will use a very good camera and will shoot two performers on a roof, lip-syncing and casually dancing to the song, and after that, I will zoom into the frame and let the camera move to the shift of the music, on different details of the shot.

What are the lyrics?

Terrorist of Love / Turkish Delight / Search me / Search me. I think it’s a love song, using political words. I made up the choreography.

Have you used meme-type imagery before or is this new too?

On my Instagram yes, but no, never in a video. It doesn’t ever fit with a plot so I could never do it.

Can you talk about your Instagram?

I’m obsessed. I was in rehab for three weeks!

You’re addicted to Instagram?

Yeah, my friend told me I should stop. I should stop. I think I’m really neurotic so that’s why I’m doing it. Instead of biting my nails I’m posting on Instagram. I got addicted, and I’m trying to post less—that’s why I’m erasing posts all the time. Also, I decide to always have less than 1,000.

1,000 posts? 

Images in in general, yeah. Because, to me, it looks vulgar if I have a lot. I also don’t follow people who post too much. That’s why I don’t like myself so much for doing it. I’m much less exclusive when I post a lot.

Sometimes an artist’s work becomes devalued when the artist overproduces. The demand can’t keep up with supply. You talk about your Instagram as if it’s going to lose value if you over-post!

No, it’s not that—I just don’t like people that post a lot. It means they have no life, and as you can see, I have tons of life. [Laughter.] No, I don’t know, I just post images all the time because whenever I have an empty moment I start to correct images and post instead of reading or doing something constructive. Like I told Fabian [an actor in Cytter’s upcoming theater performance], “Let’s go outside and bring the book,” so we brought the book and then I just sat outside posting images.

I’ve been following your Instagram for a while, and I’ve notice you use a lot of hashtags, which become poetic in a sense because they really aren’t useful as hashtags. It seems like sometimes the images on Instagram are secondary to your comments and hashtags.

It’s a lack of confidence sometimes. I think that my images are not good enough so I try to pump them up with the right hashtags. I want to express myself but I think sometimes images are not expressing myself. And sometimes I just don’t have good images! With all the life I have, I don’t have juicy, juicy images! [Laughs.]

In your films, what is more important, the images or the language?

I think the images, generally. The images are not connected very well, so I need lots of language to pull them together. Actually, there is one thing that’s funny with Terrorist of Love. Even if I use a good-quality camera it always comes out really bad, and for this video I used a 4K. So it’s a 4K image, but because you get into the frame, the quality comes out worse than any normal camera. So I said, “Oh, I’m keeping my line of bad images!”

In the first 10 seconds of the video, I thought you were zooming in and out on a still photograph—but then I began to realize that parts of the image were animated, and it was actually a video.

Yeah, well the camera didn’t move the whole time. That was my initial plan: to do everything like voyeurism in the frame.

Yeah, it’s amazing how dynamic you were able to make it without moving the camera. There’s so much going on in the video even though there was really very little activity on set.

Yeah I think people will really enjoy watching it… I think. I like it a lot. It’s going to be cute. It’s like, all Disney.

The scenery is so New York. It’s shot on a rooftop covered in graffiti, overlooking the Manhattan skyline. This kind of scenery is kind of cliché for a certain type of music video—but Terrorist of Love is so not the type of video you’d imagine in this setting.

[Laughs.] Yeah. At first I imagined filming it with the musician who wrote the song at his place in Israel. When we used to work together we got along very well, but when I left Israel 13 years ago, we became a bit like my characters and started drifting apart. I realized I’d be happier to do it not with him, but just to give him the video in the end. So that’s why I imposed everything I planned to do in Israel just on New York. To get into the frame with the sound of the music as the goal.

Your films are really transparent about the medium. So, sure, they’re about some characters, and there’s a storyline, but they’re also about people who are acting in front of a camera, and people who are reading scripts, and people who are making a film—in a way that makes the viewer very aware that they are watching a video. And in more recent years, you’ve also started doing live performances and theater. So I’m wondering how you carry the meta-narrative onto the stage?

Actually it’s quite easy. Now I’m doing a script for a theater we’re going to do. Suzy starts saying, “You might know me from other performances as in—just kidding, I never get the roll.” So you just need to say it and it’s there. It’s just a matter of marking it. You always know that it’s an act. I didn’t invent it, you know so, it’s quite easy— you just play all the time between those worlds.

Audiences obviously have very different expectations when they’re watching film or they’re watching theater. I imagine with film you’re able, through editing, to better direct how your audiences experience the film. You probably can’t do this as easily with theater. Is your audience on your mind when you’re making your work?

I see myself as my audience. When I see a theater play, I’m judging it. So the first thing I had to do when I wrote the text for Suzy is pull one over on the audience, to shock them so that after they stop judging and get into the plot. I like to have a plot but also I like the audience not to forget that they’re watching a play, or watching a film. I hate to waste my time watching other people’s stories. I like when things are not clear to me. I also like that I can feel things—I like to get sad. But I’m not so good at making sad things, I’m better at humor. People are more attached to things if they are feeling sad, so I try to make sad things now, but it’s really embarrassing me.

So your motivation to make sad stories comes not from necessarily having sad stories to tell but wanting people to feel sad?

Yes, exactly. It’d be great if they can’t understand what the story was but they say, “It was so sad.” That would be great because it means I really manipulated them.

In Video Art Manual, the format you’ve set up is similar to a how-to video and then woven into that is this kind of absurdist narrative about an impending apocalyptic solar flare event.

Ah yes.

And then on top of that you’re also bringing the viewer into it by commenting on their experience, and so I’m wondering how you differentiate, or if you differentiate, between narrative and content?

Well for me the content is actually the structure of things, not the narrative itself. The narrative is just an excuse for the audience to keep on following. With the solar flame, I was a bit consumed by it. I read it and I was really worried for my job because they said there will be an electricity power cut, and I said “How can I make videos?” and I said “Oh, I can make drawings.”

I mentioned several times in the video the solar flame and the consequences because that will make the audience keep on watching it, and, for me, that narrative is more interesting than the history of video art. So for me the structures and the frames are much more interesting than the narrative, and the narrative is just for the audience. And it’s also a way for the images to come together so I can smash different things and it will make sense for you because there is some kind of narrative—my excuse for it.

So making a narrative is just an excuse—

To create structures, yeah.

So the narrative gives you an excuse to make a formal film. You also use many different languages in your films and I wonder if that’s an excuse to use subtitles and text as another play on form?

Yeah. Right. Also, you see an Italian movie and it’s not acted well or you don’t get the language so you just say, “Oh, it’s the Italian”—that’s what I think, “Oh, it’s the Italian, Italians are like that.” But when I was in Italy I made a movie there and I asked one of the girls to act like Anna Magnani and she knew exactly what I meant and I realized she was acting a certain way—it’s not like the way Italians act normally, so I was right.

What’s your writing process like? Would you walk us through how you get from point A to B?

It’s depressing actually, I just don’t leave the house. That’s why I’m posting a lot. I have no life so because I need to write all the time. I need to find an idea and until I have an idea I cannot write. It’s better not to write until I have the idea, and then when I start writing I write halfway through and I think it’s fine, and then I realize I cannot continue because the idea is not finished, it doesn’t have enough rules. I need to have more rules and more framing.

What do you mean by rules?

For example I made a Russian movie in Russia with naked people—lots of penises. It’s a very classic movie—the camera doesn’t move. I needed some rules… nine shots with no zoom in and no panning; three acts with three shots in each act. I was in Russia and I was googling “crazy Russians” and I found a crazy image of Russians taping up their apartment with plastic and then flooding it like a swimming pool. My backyard is really fitting for that, actually. That was in my head, that I wanted to turn my backyard into a swimming pool. So I decided to make a movie because of this image.

Because it was with Russians I could do it hardcore, and there were lots of penises and porn and stuff like that. I thought also, because it’s Russians, it’s a bit political because of the power shift I think now in the world. So there were three guys and one girl because I’m concerned about women’s rights, and then it begins actually representing minorities in general. At the end of each act, one of them dies, but keeps on living in the next act. So that was part of the rules.

Another rule was that it needed to be in Russian, and the camera doesn’t move so they need some time to lower themselves to fit into the frame. Maybe there were more things that I forgot. But I need lots of rules just in order to write.

I’m thinking about this device you’re using in Terrorist of Love where you don’t move the camera. The video is static with no cuts. It seems super contemporary, actually, in that a lot of video we’re seeing are coming directly from people’s iPhones. For example, on Facebook Live or Periscope, it’s live-streamed and you can’t make edits. We’re probably getting used to seeing more of these really long takes.

Ah, yeah, that’s cool. Actually in cinema, that’s what counts as a good thing—if the take is long. And subconsciously I think it somehow stays with you. At least it does with me in The Passenger with Jack Nicholson. The last shot is 360 degrees uncut. I like it.

Do you have anything coming up that you’re excited about?

Excited? [Laughs.]

[Laughs.] Do you have anything coming up that you are excited about or not excited about?

My book [A-Z Life Coaching] will come out in two weeks. The book’s cover designer is the designer of the poster from The Lobster, the movie. I met him once and I found his email and he agreed to do it, so it’s really cool. I like it; he invented it.

Also there will be this theater thing we are going to do. We’re going to shoot one part with Colby Keller, who’s a gay porn star, and we are going to show it in the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam in November. I don’t know if I’m excited about this, or I’m afraid. Woah, yeah, I’m not excited yet.

Get your Keren Cytter Free Download Here

https://daata-editions.com/art/video/terrorist-of-love

Keren Cytter – Terrorist of Love

In Andrew Goldstein, Artspace, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, Frieze, Frieze Art Fair, keren cytter, Reading Room, Terrorist of Love, Uncategorized on 04/10/2016 at 10:43 am

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Daata Editions and Artspace have co-commissioned a new video work, ‘Terrorist of Love’, by artist Keren Cytter, available for Free download on the Daata Editions website!

The work continues the New York based artist’s experimental filmmaking practice that subverts cinematic tropes, layers multiple fractured narratives, and reflexively refers to the medium. Tapping into a viral strain of humour found on Tumblr and GIF-sharing sites, the video is as chuckle-worthy, as it is contemplative.

Keren Cytter has exhibited extensively nationally and internationally, including: venues such as the Hammer Museum, New Museum, Whitney Museum, Guggenheim Museum, the 53rd Venice Biennale, Kunsthal Charlottenborg – Copenhagen and Kunst Werke – Berlin.

Download ‘Terrorist of Love’ for Free here!

Frieze London, Reading Room – the Daata Editions talk features: Keren Cytter in Conversation with Andrew Goldstein, Editor-in-Chief, Artspace.

Artspace Editor-in-Chief, Andrew M. Goldstein, will be in conversation with Keren Cytter, on her new video artwork ‘Terrorist of Love‘ and her filmic artwork practice, which picks apart genre conventions and other cinematic tropes with sly, dry wit.

Frieze Reading Room, Frieze London
Friday 7 October 2016
12.30pm – 1pm
More info:
frieze.com
artspace.com

 

 

More links:

Frieze Reading Room https://frieze.com/article/reading-room-frieze-london-2016

Facebook Event Page https://www.facebook.com/events/1608517026108863/

FAD Magazine http://fadmagazine.com/2016/09/29/daata-editions/

Cultural Traffic http://culturaltraffic.com/

Daata Editions News – Frieze Art Fair Week 2016

In artie vierkant, Artspace, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, David Risley Gallery, Frieze, Frieze Art Fair, keren cytter, new contemporaries, Uncategorized on 01/10/2016 at 10:30 am

 

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DAATA EDITIONS PRESS RELEASE 
FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEK – LONDON 2016

Daata Editions will be launching new artworks online and at Frieze London in the Reading Room, featuring artists: Keren Cytter, Melanie Eckersley, Hannah Ford, Ed Fornieles, Jasmine Johnson, Scott Lyman, Scott Mason, Ariana Reines, Daniel Swan, Abri de Swardt, Artie Vierkant. 

Daata Editions is collaborating with New Contemporaries, Gutter Records, Elephant MagazinePOSTmatter / WeTransfer (featuring Saya Woolfalk), FAD, alongside a co-commission project with Artspace launching with a new video work by artist Keren Cytter called ‘Terrorist of Love’ which will be available for FREE download via both websites. A new ‘Curated’ section is now live on the platform, through which guest curators will introduce new artists’ works on the website, launching with Katherine Finerty as curator and introducing artist Phoebe Boswell to the Daata platform. New York based curator and writer Lindsay Howard has written the new foreword to the website. Daata is screening selected new artworks at Cultural Traffic, a new print publishing arts fair.

https://daata-editions.com/
http://artspace.com
https://frieze.com/article/reading-room-frieze-london-2016
http://culturaltraffic.com/
http://postmatter.com/

Art Meets Tech: The Democratisation of Art an article by Moira Benigson: http://thembsgroup.co.uk/internal/art-meets-tech-the-democratisation-of-art/

Frieze London, Reading Room
Daata Editions will be screening newly commissioned artworks at Frieze London’s Reading Room, October 6 – 9 2016, by artists Ed Fornieles, Ariana Reines, Daniel Swan, Artie Vierkant and Keren Cytter.

New Contemporaries
Daata Editions will also feature new commissioned artworks by artists selected by New Contemporaries, artists include: Melanie Eckersley, Hannah Ford, Jasmine Johnson, Scott Lyman, Scott Mason, Abri de Swardt.

 

Daata Editions & Artspace co-commission

Daata x Artspace Commissions: Keren Cytter, Terrorist of Love, 2016:                          Daata Editions and Artspace have collaborated to co-commission a video work by the artist Keren Cytter, which will be available for FREE download from Tuesday Oct 4 & Wednesday Oct 5 on both websites.

Daata Editions will host a talk at Frieze London Reading Room, on Friday 7 October, 12.30pm with artist Keren Cytter and Andrew Goldstein, Editor in Chief, Artspace, in conversation. https://www.facebook.com/events/1608517026108863/

Artspace will be screening Terrorist of Love at Sunday Art Fair, 6-9 October at Ambika P3

Frieze Art Fair, London
https://frieze.com/article/reading-room-frieze-london-2016

Artspace @ Sunday Art Fair
http://www.artspace.com
http://www.sundayartfair.com/

 

More Info
Daata Editions and Artspace are delighted to announce the offer of a new co-commissioned video work by Keren Cytter as a downloadable collectible edition, free of charge. The video entitled ‘Terrorist of Love’ continues the New York based artist’s experimental filmmaking practice that subverts cinematic tropes, layers multiple fractured narratives, and reflexively refers to the medium. Tapping into a viral strain of humour found on Tumblr and GIF-sharing sites, the video is as chuckle-worthy as it is contemplative. Using a fixed 4K camera, Cytter shot the video in one take, before devising an unconventional music video format in post-production using key framing, meme-like imagery, and an original soundtrack—an unprecedented approach to video-making in any genre.

 

Lindsay Howard a text for Daata Editions
Curator Lindsay Howard will contribute in the Foreword section of Daata Editions, presenting a text on the platform and the new artworks release. The text will become available to read online together with the launch of the new artworks during Frieze London. https://daata-editions.com/info/foreword

 

daata-x-cultural-traffic

Daata Editions at Cultural Traffic
A New Print Publishing Arts Fair

CULTURAL TRAFFIC is launched by editor, designer and collector Toby Mott who says: “CULTURAL TRAFFIC is a fascinating window into the flourishing post-digital zine scene”.
Daata will screen works by: Keren Cytter, Ed Fornieles, Ariana Reines, Daniel Swan, Artie Vierkant / New Contemporaries selects Melanie Eckersley, Hannah Ford, Jasmine Johnson, Scott Lyman, Scott Mason, Abri de Swardt (all released at Frieze London) / Larry Achiampong, Casey Jane Ellison, Rashaad Newsome, Tameka Norris, Saya Woolfalk / Gutter Records has selected Jake Chapman, Graham Dolphin, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen (all released at EXPO Chicago)

CULTURAL TRAFFIC: Friday/Saturday 7–8th October 2016.
Juju’s Bar & Stage, Old Truman Brewery, Ely’s Yard, 15 Hanbury Street, London, E1 6QR
For further info contact: culturaltraffic@gmail.com
http://www.culturaltraffic.com
New Curated section on Daata Editions website
We are excited to announce the launch of a new section on the website, titled ‘Curated’ through which Daata Editions will invite guest curators to introduce new artists’ works on the website. The curators will be asked to make a selection of Daata Editions artworks as well as present works by other artists, in a way that facilitates the artistic conversation and creates a dialogue between the platform and various contemporary art practices.

Our inaugural curator is Katherine Finerty, who presents works by Daata Editions artists Tameka Norris and Rashaad Newsome, alongside a video artwork by Phoebe Boswell. All of these works address interrogating identity politics through a digital confessional portrait of sorts, employing sound, communication and voice (from inflection and cadence to signification and representation) to challenge stereotypes, double consciousness, and modes of self expression / storytelling. The Curated section launched online during EXPO Chicago, September 22 – 25.

EXPO Chicago
Daata Editions participated at EXPO CHICAGO, the International Exposition of Contemporary & Modern Art, September 22 – 25 presenting newly commissioned artworks by Daata Editions artists: Larry Achiampong, Casey Jane Ellison, Rashaad Newsome, Tameka Norris, Saya Woolfalk.
In addition, Daata Editions has commissioned Gutter Records, a record store and label for music made by artists based at David Risley Gallery, Copenhagen, to select artists for the Daata Editions website. Gutter Records has selected Jake Chapman, Graham Dolphin, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen, whose works for the platform were also presented during the fair.

The newly launched artworks were joined by other recently released artists on Daata, including: Sofie Alsbo, Thora Dolven Balke, Tracey Emin, Michael Manning, Rashaad Newsome (sound works), Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Jacolby Satterwhite, John Skoog, Katie Torn and bitforms gallery selects Sara Ludy, Jonathan Monaghan and Quayola.

 

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Saya Woolfalk – Colour Mixing Machine

POSTmatter Collaboration
We are excited to announce our collaboration with the digital publication POSTmatter and the file sharing online platform WeTransfer, for the launch of Saya Woolfalk’s commission for Daata Editions, collectively titled ‘Color Mixing Machine’.

Saya Woolfalk’s works went online at Daata Editions on Thursday 8 September to coincide with the launch of a custom-made wallpaper created by the artist and presented by Daata Editions and POSTmatter on WeTransfer. In addition, POSTmatter presented an interview with the artist, focusing on her practice, which spans from performance to digital practices, and the Emphatics, her fictional future female species.

Saya Woolfalk’s ‘Color Mixing Machine’ series formed part of Daata Editions presentation at EXPO Chicago, September 22 – 25, with a solo screen installation in the main fair. In addition, POSTmatter will present the works in the launching party of its redesigned site and first online issue ‘New Mythologies’ in London on September 29th at Second Home London Fields.

Saya Woolfalk’s works on Daata Editions:
http://daata-editions.com

Saya Woolfalk POSTmatter interview:
http://postmatter.com

There is Much More Exciting News, Announcements & Adventures coming very soon …