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Archive for the ‘Jane Bustin’ Category

The Feeling of Things, Jane Bustin at Fox/Jensen Sydney and Art Basel Hong Kong

In Art Basel, Art Basel Hong Kong, Jane Bustin, Uncategorized on 23/03/2019 at 7:06 pm

JANE BUSTIN OPENS AT FOX/JENSEN SYDNEY 6 APRIL

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To hold a thing, whether with our hand or our gaze is to capture a feeling, giving meaning to the object, not the subject. – Jane Bustin 2019

Ezra Pound said that “glance is the enemy of vision” and whilst I am disinclined to argue with his insights and though, in essence I agree with his sentiment, I am not convinced all glances ought to be judged equally.

There is something in the fugitive glance that may reveal a greater truth, a visual veracity that is assembled through glimpses, each with a different complexion, made at a different moment, felt in a different way, seen with differing consciousness.

Jane Bustin’s paintings seem to encourage us to “glance”. Their composition, their material range, their attention to edge, their use of reflective materials such as copper and aluminium lends perception a contingency that resists static vision. These glances do not signal inattention, rather they invite a heightened if unconscious sensitivity and ultimately, contemplation.

French poet Francis Ponge, whose works have “stirred” Jane Bustin’s and whose elevation of the simple objects in our world – a plant, a shell, soap – revealed the hidden relationship between the inner life of human beings and the world of objects.

Bustin’s works take their titles from early 20th century modernist literature and poetry – Djuna Barnes, Jean Rhys as well as Ponge, – “a sensory language rather than a dictatorial narrative”.

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Jean – sleep it off lady, Jane Bustin, 2019, wood, acrylic, copper, silk, beetroot 51 x 43 cm

Poet Robert Bly wrote of Ponge “It is as if the object itself, a stump or an orange, has links with the human psyche, and the unconscious provides material it would not give if asked directly. The unconscious passes into the object and returns.”
This exchange between the unconscious and the object feels to me to be at the heart of Bustin’s exquisite works. Her modestly scaled paintings feel as if they were assembled from a constellation of modest materials but whose conflation creates new unimagined sensations and feelings.

Bustin suggests that “the surfaces experience a range of intimate handling techniques, sanding, brushing, dying, burning, ironing, masking, stroking, dripping … over a period of time the experience between the maker and the material is co-dependent creating a history of conversations, considerations, mistakes and solutions.”

For Ponge, all objects “yearn to express themselves, and they mutely await the coming of the word so that they may reveal the hidden depths of their being,” Clearly for Bustin all materials yearn to express themselves too. Rather than waiting for the “word” Bustin adjusts and aligns matter directly, announcing new perceptions.

Bustin’s feeling for material is highly nuanced. In The Feeling of Things there are unexpected and beautiful juxtapositions of colour and surface, dualities of hard and soft, reflective and absorbent, face and flank, are resolved within a pliable geometry that allows her to explore matter and its interrelationship in the way that a scientist might were they in search of poetry via empiricism.

Jane Bustin will be present for her exhibition which opens at Fox/Jensen Sydney on Saturday the 6th of April in Sydney. Jane will also be showing with Fox Jensen at Art Basel Hong Kong.

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Young Mother, Jane Bustin, 2018, anodised aluminium, wood, acrylic 56 x 39 cm

PDF PREVIEW

Fox Jensen

Jane Bustin

 

The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin

In Art Night, Art NIght London, Dancer, Film, Gryn, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, John Snijders, London, Marriot, Nijinsky, Poppy Bowers, Uncategorized, Video on 16/10/2018 at 2:33 pm
The Nijinsky project – installation assemblage pieces:
1933 bio Nijinsky by Romona Nijinsky, cloth, acrylic, porcelain, wood, steel
IMG_5446

Romola’s love

work by Jane Bustin

Relentless Hatred

work by Jane Bustin

Dark Moods

work by Jane Bustin

Hothouse plants

photo 1

Misfortunes

The Nijinsky project – Faun

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Premiered for Artnight London 2018 at London County Hall, Southbank London

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Jane Bustin
Isaac Gryn 
John Snijders
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Installation and performance – Vimeo 
Highlights – Vimeo
.
Duration:
13 minutes.
.
Introduction by Poppy Bowers
In 1912, Ballet Russes premiered L’Après-midi d’un Faune at Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris. Eschewing lyrical movement in favour of geometric shapes, its avant-garde choreography and sexually explicit content divided audiences, prompting both outrage and awe. The performance, now regarded as the first modernist ballet, was choreographed and performed by Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950), senior dancer of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes, and also his lover.
An iconic dancer, Nijinsky was experimental in his combination of great technical skill with deep, sensual expression. Over recent years, the artist Jane Bustin has made work in response to Nijinsky’s extraordinary formal experimentation. Like Nijinsky, Bustin is concerned with locating emotion within the restrained forms of geometric abstraction. Her pared-down paintings juxtapose panels of oil paint alongside tactile media such as porcelain, silk, copper or latex, to give sensory understanding to historical subject matter.
Faun is a new collaborative work that pays homage to Nijinsky’s tumultuous life. The work comprises of three parts; six table-mounted assemblages made by Bustin, a musical score by composer John Snijders and a balletic performance by the young dancer Isaac Gryn. The table works create a conceptual and spatial framework for the performative components, taking as its starting point a published book of Nijinsky’s life.
Following his ascendency as one who heralded the era of modern ballet, Nijinsky met misfortune. Having secretly married a young dancer, Romola, a furious Diaghilev subsequently expelled him from the Ballet Russes. Failing to recover from the artistic and financial loss of Diaghilev’s patronage, Nijinsky was forced to abandon dance. Suffering from psychosis he spent his remaining years residing in and out of asylums, until his death in Surrey, England. The account of his success and decline is recited in Nijinsky’s biography written by Romola and published in 1933, a single copy of which forms the centrepiece of each table assemblage.
Each book is accompanied by monochrome panels of various media including cloth, porcelain, paint and wood, the fragility of which point to emotionally-sensitive moments in Nijinsky’s life. From tallest to shortest, the tables take the following titles from a chance finding of a 1933 newspaper review that chart Nijinsky’s psychological trauma; Hothouse Plants, Relentless Hatred, Dark Moods, Misfortunes, “I am an Artist” and Romola’s Love. Typical of Bustin’s work, the proportions of the tables relate to the scale of the human body. Here, the table heights correspond to particular ballet movements measured from the young male dancer’s body, who is the artist’s son.
John Snijder’s musical score, titled Afternoon, was created specifically for this project. It reworks the piano piece of the original orchestral work for L’Après-midi d’un Faune composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), employing chance operations to unravel its structural order. Developed in dialogue between Bustin and Gryn, with support from Matthew Paluch and Dance Research Studio, a 13-minute dance, made in response to the music, is performed within the parameters of the tables. Combining symmetrical formations with lessening control, Gryn’s movements mirror the untangled composure of the accompanying piano, revealing an intimacy of inner tenderness and anxiety, rather than athletic display.
Contrasting sculptural materials with a temporal performative presence, Faun grapples with the troubled pursuit for artistic perfection and speaks of the psychological vulnerability that is bound up in such ambition.
Poppy Bowers, Exhibitions Curator at the Whitworth, The University of Manchester
.
John Snijders ‘Afternoon’ 2018
The composition “Afternoon” was created especially for the Nijinsky Project – Faun. I took, as base material, the piano reduction made by Leonard Borwick in 1914 of the orchestral work “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune”, composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918) in 1894. For “Afternoon” I have divided the piece into twelve sections, and chose one or two representative bars from each section. These bars were paired so that the piece now contains six structural parts, which do not always follow the original’s chronology. The order of the bars, repeated over and over again, was determined using chance operations. Arriving at a final basic structure, more chance operations were used to determine, bar by bar, if, and if yes, how many notes would be altered, going either up or down in pitch, but not altering the rhythm of the bars. This results in the material remaining recognisable, but slowly deteriorating and getting out of focus until the start of the next section, where the process will start all over again. The six parts relate to the six tables with Jane’s artworks, and the musical process mirrors Nijinsky’s slow descent into developing a more and more distorted mind.
John Snijders, Artistic Director of the Ives Ensemble, Associate Professor in Music Performance at Durham University.
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Jane Bustin, artist, lives and works in London and is represented by:
Copperfield London.
&
Fox Jensen Sydney & Fox Jensen McCrory Auckland

The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin – Art Night London at the Marriot, London County Hall – July 7

In Art Night, Art NIght London, Dancer, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, John Snijders, London, Marriot, Nijinsky, Uncategorized on 29/06/2018 at 12:44 pm
faun landscape1 copy
The Nijinsky Project – Faun by Jane Bustin. 
 
Art Night London 7 July 2018
An Installation and Performance featuring dancer, Isaac Gryn & pianist and composer, John Snijders.
Book your Free place here
 
The Nijinsky project – Faun
Saturday 7 July 2018

Installation and performance 

Artist: Jane Bustin
Dancer:  Isaac Gryn
Pianist: John Snijders
Music:  Afternoon, variation of Debussy’s “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune” by John Snijders

at

King George V Room
Marriott Hotel
London County Hall

Westminster Bridge Road
Southbank
London SE1 7BP

Performances: 
6.30pm, 7.30pm, 8.30pm
Duration: 13 minutes

Introduction by Poppy Bowers
In 1912, Ballet Russes premiered L’Après-midi d’un Faune at Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris. Eschewing lyrical movement in favour of geometric shapes, its avant-garde choreography and sexually explicit content divided audiences, prompting both outrage and awe. The performance, now regarded as the first modernist ballet, was choreographed and performed by Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950), senior dancer of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes, and also his lover.
An iconic dancer, Nijinsky was experimental in his combination of great technical skill with deep, sensual expression. Over recent years, the artist Jane Bustin has made work in response to Nijinsky’s extraordinary formal experimentation. Like Nijinsky, Bustin is concerned with locating emotion within the restrained forms of geometric abstraction. Her pared-down paintings juxtapose panels of oil paint alongside tactile media such as porcelain, silk, copper or latex, to give sensory understanding to historical subject matter.
Faun is a new collaborative work that pays homage to Nijinsky’s tumultuous life. The work comprises of three parts; six table-mounted assemblages made by Bustin, a musical score by composer John Snijders and a balletic performance by the young dancer Isaac Gryn. The table works create a conceptual and spatial framework for the performative components, taking as its starting point a published book of Nijinsky’s life.
Following his ascendency as one who heralded the era of modern ballet, Nijinsky met misfortune. Having secretly married a young dancer, Romola, a furious Diaghilev subsequently expelled him from the Ballet Russes. Failing to recover from the artistic and financial loss of Diaghilev’s patronage, Nijinsky was forced to abandon dance. Suffering from psychosis he spent his remaining years residing in and out of asylums, until his death in Surrey, England. The account of his success and decline is recited in Nijinsky’s biography written by Romola and published in 1933, a single copy of which forms the centrepiece of each table assemblage.
Each book is accompanied by monochrome panels of various media including cloth, porcelain, paint and wood, the fragility of which point to emotionally-sensitive moments in Nijinsky’s life. From tallest to shortest, the tables take the following titles from a chance finding of a 1933 newspaper review that chart Nijinsky’s psychological trauma; Hothouse Plants, Relentless Hatred, Dark Moods, Misfortunes, “I am an Artist” and Romola’s Love. Typical of Bustin’s work, the proportions of the tables relate to the scale of the human body. Here, the table heights correspond to particular ballet movements measured from the young male dancer’s body, who is the artist’s son.
John Snijder’s musical score, titled Afternoon, was created specifically for this project. It reworks the piano piece of the original orchestral work for L’Après-midi d’un Faune composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), employing chance operations to unravel its structural order. Developed in dialogue between Bustin and Gryn, with support from Matthew Paluch and Dance Research Studio, a 13-minute dance, made in response to the music, is performed within the parameters of the tables. Combining symmetrical formations with lessening control, Gryn’s movements mirror the untangled composure of the accompanying piano, revealing an intimacy of inner tenderness and anxiety, rather than athletic display.
Contrasting sculptural materials with a temporal performative presence, Faun grapples with the troubled pursuit for artistic perfection and speaks of the psychological vulnerability that is bound up in such ambition.
Poppy Bowers, Exhibitions Curator at the Whitworth, The University of Manchester

John Snijders ‘Afternoon’ 2018
The composition “Afternoon” was created especially for the Nijinsky Project – Faun. I took, as base material, the piano reduction made by Leonard Borwick in 1914 of the orchestral work “Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un Faune”, composed by Claude Debussy (1862-1918) in 1894. For “Afternoon” I have divided the piece into twelve sections, and chose one or two representative bars from each section. These bars were paired so that the piece now contains six structural parts, which do not always follow the original’s chronology. The order of the bars, repeated over and over again, was determined using chance operations. Arriving at a final basic structure, more chance operations were used to determine, bar by bar, if, and if yes, how many notes would be altered, going either up or down in pitch, but not altering the rhythm of the bars. This results in the material remaining recognisable, but slowly deteriorating and getting out of focus until the start of the next section, where the process will start all over again. The six parts relate to the six tables with Jane’s artworks, and the musical process mirrors Nijinsky’s slow descent into developing a more and more distorted mind. 
John Snijders, Artistic Director of the Ives Ensemble, Associate Professor in Music Performance at Durham University.

Jane Bustin, artist, lives and works in London and is represented by Copperfield London
http://www.copperfieldgallery.com/

With special thanks to: Aida Bañeres Argilés, Poppy Bowers, Richard Grimes, Isaac Gryn, Jacky Lansey – Dance Research Studio, Will Lunn, Morley College – Ceramics Dept, Matthew Paluch, Aina Pomar – Copperfield London, Zarina Rossheart – Art Night London, Thornhill Pianos, John Snijders

The Nijinsky project – Faun by Jane Bustin – Art Night London – July 7

In Art Night, Art NIght London, BFI, Copperfield, Gallery, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, Jane Gryn, John Snijders, Marriot, Nijinsky, Uncategorized on 03/06/2018 at 4:43 pm

The Nijinsky project – Faun by Jane Bustin

A performance and installation featuring:

Dancer, Isaac Gryn

Pianist, John Snijders

Art Night London – July 7

King George V Room, Marriott, London County Hall, Westminster Bridge Rd, South Bank, London SE1 7PB

Faun is a performative installation by artist Jane Bustin, inspired by Nijinsky’s iconic work, the first modernist ballet, L’après-midi d’un faune. Bustin presents six artworks each featuring the 1933 biography of Nijinsky by his wife Romola. The live premiere performance conceived by the artist, features her son, dancer Isaac Gryn, alongside a deconstructed version of Debussy’s original composition, titled Afternoon, specially composed by pianist and artistic director of the Ives Ensemble, John Snijders, and will be played live. The installation explores themes of structure and geometry found within relationships of nature and nurture, perfection and failure. Alongside a publication text by curator Poppy Bowers.

Performances at: 6.30pm, 7.30pm and 8.30pm
running time: 13 minutes

Pre-registration required/walk-ins will be admitted depending on capacity

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-nijinsky-project-faun-by-jane-bustin-tickets-47239788479

http://2018.artnight.london/projects/jane-bustin/

http://www.copperfieldgallery.com/jane-bustin.html

https://www.marriott.co.uk |

Instagram @janebustin

Ashley Lyon | Jane Bustin, Modern Domestics, Jane Lombard Gallery, Nov 2 – Dec 21 2017

In 19th St, Ashley Lyon, Jane Bustin, Jane Gryn, Jane Lombard, Jane Lombard Gallery, Lisa Carlson, Modern Domestics, Uncategorized on 11/10/2017 at 10:55 am

IMG_2670

MODERN DOMESTICS

ASHLEY LYON | JANE BUSTIN

 

November 2 – December 21, 2017

Opening Reception: November 2, 6-8pm

 

JANE LOMBARD GALLERY

518 W 19 St. New York 10011

http://www.janelombardgallery.com

Jane Lombard Gallery is pleased to announce Modern Domestics, a two-person exhibition with Ashley Lyon and Jane Bustin. Using quotidian objects as the foundation for their work Lyon and Bustin’s practices similarly evoke the mixed sentiments found in domiciliary settings: equally comforting and melancholic, durable and decayed. Together they celebrate the agency and strength granted in self-actualization by means of owning aesthetic and sentimental environments, the ability to maintain, preserve and reinvent the container of personal experience. The works featured not only encompass time, memories and human sensation but also access a certainty of selfhood in the particularly gendered territory of the home.
Lyon and Bustin employ methodologies of the emotional labor owed to materials closely connected to shared biographies combined with the physical labor of thoughtful creation. Ashley Lyon’s sculptures are detailed replicas of objects inherently soft in nature with heightened tactile and wistful character; they are meticulously copied into ceramic material, converted into something solid yet easily damaged. During the meditative experience of looking at and delicately crafting these familiar possessions, the tenderness and warmth of home is embedded. Lyon’s duvets, mattresses and floor tiles expand the location of where corporal sensation remains, they oscillate between atemporal representations of everyday items and uncanny beings striving toward the realism found within the storytelling of their unique marks and textures.
Jane Bustin combines traditional and contemporary materials, exploring the dichotomy between their abstract minimalist composition and the sentimental qualities of ceramic, textiles and found objects. Concerned with deconstructing the formal components of abstraction, she considers the properties and arrangement of materials, extending the link between craft, concept and movement. Bustin likens her grandmother’s laundering, baking and crocheting routines to the type of diligence she applies as an artist; folding, flattening and rolling until the organic is contained. The pale tones, reflective surfaces and intuitive organization prompt a tenderness and familiarity reminiscent of a bedroom vanity, a micro space of solace within the home. The artists maneuver a relationship between the object’s ontology and their transformation into vehicles of psychological projection; a parallel to the work’s intimate development in the studio against their perceptive contextual availability in the gallery.
Modern Domestics asserts the complexity of emotional security found in the home and the histories amassed in objects of comfort, those of the life interior. The work affirms domesticity as a uniquely feminine domain, a beacon of safety and transcendence from the transgressions of modernity. Although aware of its unequivocal hybridity with fragility and temporality, it is deemed private, everlasting and manageable against the volatile anxieties of the external.
Ashley Lyon (b.1983 in Palm Springs, CA) lives and works in Newburgh, NY. Lyon received a BFA in Ceramics from the University of Washington and an MFA in Sculpture + Extended Media from the Virginia Commonwealth University. Her work has been exhibited at Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, Omaha, NE; Hunter College, New York, NY; SUNY Cortland, Cortland, NY; The Sculpture Center, Cleveland, OH; Alfred Ceramic Art Museum, Alfred, NY and Jane Lombard Gallery, New York, NY.
Jane Bustin (b.1964 in London, UK) lives and works in London, UK. She studied a Portsmouth Univerisity, UK and Laboratorio per Affresco, Prato, Italy. Her work has been exhibited at The British Library, London, UK; Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, UK; Ferens Art Museum, Hull, UK; Kettles Yard, Cambridge, UK; Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK; Ingleby Gallery, Edinburgh, UK; Copperfield, London, UK and Leslie Gallery, Berlin, Germany.

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Text for Jane Bustin by Anthony Rudolf

In abstraction, Anthony Rudolf, Berlin, Gallery, Jane Bustin, Leslie, Minimal, painting, Uncategorized on 05/07/2017 at 6:53 pm
20170625-MWEISE-LESLIE_GALLERY-JBUSTIN-0014-R2GO_WEB-1920x1281

Jane Bustin, Fühler at Leslie, Berlin

TEXT FOR JANE BUSTIN
Anthony Rudolf

What could be less verbal than a Jane Bustin painting?

What could be more verbal than a Mallarmé poem?

‘One does not write with ideas but with words’, Mallarmé said to Degas, who fancied himself as a poet and had plenty of ideas.

As Borges might have said, we would expect the first livre d’artiste to have been created by Mallarmé (as translator) and Manet: Poe’s ‘Raven’, and we would be right.

Let me rephrase my first sentence: not what could be less verbal but what could be more silent than a Jane Bustin painting? After all, Debussy’s La Mer is as wordless as a Bustin painting. Silent it is not.

(Debussy set one of Mallarmé’s most significant poems, ‘L’Après-midi d’un faune’, to music. Mallarmé told Degas: ‘I thought I had already set it to music’).

My answer to the question posed above — what could be more silent than a Jane Bustin painting? — is a dead child whose absence his poet father commemorates, that “absence [which] is condensed presence” (the phrase is from a letter of Emily Dickinson, a poet well worth reading “against” Mallarmé).

The dead child is Anatole Mallarmé, whom Jane Bustin too commemorates and whose existence breathes into, inspires, Jane Bustin’s paintings, via the father’s heart-rending posthumously published poem.

It is neither paradoxical nor ironic that Jane Bustin depends so heavily on words during the gestation of her work exhibited at Test-tube. Goya went further: he included words inside the visual image.

Mallarmé would have reacted to these paintings with silence. He was always eloquent.

By Anthony Rudolf 2012

from
European Hours: Collected Poems by Anthony Rudolf

Born in London in 1942, Anthony Rudolf has two children and two grandchildren. He is the author of books of literary criticism (on Primo Levi, Piotr Rawicz and others), autobiography (The Arithmetic of Memory) and poetry (The Same River Twice and collaborations with artists), and translator of books of poetry from French (Bonnefoy, Vigée, Jabès), Russian (Vinokourov and Tvardovsky) and other languages. He has edited various anthologies. His essay on R.B. Kitaj was published by the National Gallery in 2001, and he has published essays on other painters. He is Paula Rego’s partner and main male model. He has completed a volume of short stories and is now at work on two new memoirs. His reviews, articles, poems, translations, obituaries and interviews with writers have appeared in numerous journals. Rudolf is an occasional broadcaster on radio and television and founder of Menard Press. After a lifetime of uninvolving day jobs, he became Visiting Lecturer in Arts and Humanities at London Metropolitan University (2000-2003) and Royal Literary Fund fellow at the Universities of Hertfordshire and Westminster (2003-2008). In 2004, he was appointed Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture and, in 2005, he was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature

Jane Bustin, Fühler at Leslie, Berlin

http://lesliegallery.de/jane-bustin/

Jane Bustin, Fühler at Leslie, Berlin 22 June

In Art, Berlin, Ceramics, Copper, Copperfield, Gallery, Jane Bustin, Leslie, Paintings, Poppy Bowers, Uncategorized, Whitworth on 18/06/2017 at 11:41 am
3D work by Jane Bustin

Rehearsal II, copper, acrylic, oxides, cloth
80cm x 50 cm overall, Jane Bustin, 2015

Jane Bustin

Fühler

Opening: 22.6.17, 6 pm
Exhibition: 23.6.17 – 20.7.17

Leslie

Bergfriedstraße 20
10969 Berlin

http://lesliegallery.de/

Since the 18th century, European philosophers have distinguished our capacity to feel subjectively from our ability to think rationally. We are sentient beings. As the late neurologist and author Oliver Sacks claimed, ‘perception is never purely in the present – it has to be drawn on experience of the past’. Jane Bustin’s exhibition Fühler, to have feelers or sensors about a given subject, calls on this capacity.

Bustin’s approach to painting foregrounds a conscious experience of material surface and texture. Although abstract, her works are evocations of people and histories. They are grounded in a range of intellectual sources, primarily European modernist poetry, design and literature as well as theology and philosophy. Such concepts are given physical expression through her intuitive arrangements of materials. Oil, dyed silk, porcelain, woven cloth, polished copper, tulle and ceramic glazes are just some of the media used to give shape and feeling to philosophical ideas. Born out of the tactile, her works are Fühler; they are imbued with a sensory memory and resonate with emotion.

Four works in the show, Apres II, Nijinsky I, Nijinksy’s Windows and Rehearsal II, pay tribute to the radical Russian ballet dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinksy (1890-1950). Rising to prominence as part of the belle epoch, Nijinksy combined depth and intensity of expression with symmetry to pioneer new stylistic ideas in modern dance, echoed in the compositional balance of Bustin’s three textural diptychs.

In Après II textile becomes a stand-in for the body and the memory of its physical activity. It takes its cue from Nijinsky’s choreography of the ballet L’apres midi d’un Faun in 1912, where the movement of fabric is used as a metaphor for sexual desire and physical exhaustion. Like most of Bustin’s works the scale is of human proportions. Hung quite low, Apres II sits on the wall around the height of the artist’s heart.

Elsewhere, earlier works in the exhibition include Christina the Astonishing, part of a series referencing the iconography of female saints and Tablet I, Tablet III and Tablet IV, evoking archaic forms of communication. Combining sheets of paper from both old and new notebooks, they prompt memories of the past alongside thoughts of the future.

Refusing to be filmed during his lifetime, Nijinsky strongly believed his performances should only be experienced live. Likewise Bustin prefers her works to be encountered in real time under the honest inconsistency of natural light. Like the tip of antennae, one’s eyes should roam over surface, roll over folds, shift focus through diaphanous layers and peer into copper reflections. Her works call upon an understanding of Fühler and our capacity to feel as sentient beings. They ask us to look again.

Text by Poppy Bowers, Curator, Whitworth Gallery, Manchester

Exhibited works

Facebook Event

Artspace – My Favorite Works from LISTE 2016 – preview

In Andrew Goldstein, Art Basel, Art Basel in Miami Beach, Artspace, Bauer Hotel, Daata, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Gryn, Jane Bustin, Liste, NADA, Uncategorized on 06/06/2016 at 8:48 pm

Daata Editions Director David Gryn’s Favorite Works from LISTE 2016

http://www.artspace.com/magazine/contributors/picks/david-gryn-liste-picks-53886

By Artspace Editors

June 6, 2016

Daata Editions Director David Gryn's Favorite Works from LISTE 2016

Daata Editions Director David Gryn. Photo by Alberto de Nart (shot at the Bauer Palladio, Venice)

David Gryn is the director and co-founder of the year-old digital art and video collecting platform Daata Editions and the film curator at Art Basel Miami Beach, so it’s perhaps unsurprising that his picks for LISTE 2016 tend toward moving images, technological interventions, and outide-the-box thinking of all kinds. Read up on the rationale behind his selections here, and stop by the fair from June 14-19 in Basel, Switzerland for more art world action.

MICHAEL AUDER
Gemälde II, 2015
Fonti

auder

As someone who ostensibly works with artists of the moving image I was compelled to select Michel Auder, a rare artist that seamlessly crosses the terrain between both art and filmmaking. Here’s a quote from Michel Auder that matches my thoughts on this selection: “When people ask me what’s the best thing I like, my head starts scrambling and I just can’t think of anything. Depending on the day, I might say this or that. I really don’t have any specific thing that I like better than others.”

 

JESSE DARLING
Colonel Shanks, 2016
Arcadia Missa

Jesse Darling

The Jesse Darling works shown by Arcadia Missa have a great sense of self, humor, and balance. I have been aware of Jesse and her work for some time and it is really getting the attention it deserves.

INGA MELDERE
“Students painting some of the remarkable scenery in the park”, 2016
Temnikova & Kasela Gallery

meldere

I have always been a big fan of the “sublime,” so this humorous Caspar David Friedrich-esque take by Inga Meldere took me by surprise. Temnikova and Kasela Gallery is an Estonian gallery and an art world gem.

 

SHANA MOULTON
Every Angle is an Angel, 2016
Galerie Crevoecoeur

moulton

Last year I selected Shana Mouton’s MindPlace ThoughtStream for the film program I curate for Art Basel Miami Beach—I knew how much I valued the work as I took endless images of it whilst it was playing on the huge 7000 square foot outdoor screen. I recently spent many days with Shana’s moving image works as a Daata Editions neighbor to the Gregor Staiger space at Independent Brussels and was mesmerized by the work’s magic. They are witty, aesthetic, intelligent, and spellbinding—they really are complete artworks.

 

ERKKA NISSINEN
Vantaa, 2007
Ellen de Bruijne Projects

nissinen

Crazy, funny, dark, engaging, bizarre—everything we should want from a great Finnish artist. Brilliant.

 

XIMENA GARRIDO-LECCA
Destilaciones, 2014
80m2 Livia Benavides

lecca

I have been increasingly observing that ceramics making their presence felt at art fairs. This is chiefly because my wife, the artist Jane Bustin, makes wonderful artworks with ceramic and porcelain (as well as paint, metals and fabrics)—my eye has been altered irrevocably to look more and more at this medium. This Ximena Garrido-Lecca installation at 80m2 Livia Benavides is earthy, historical, current, and intriguing.

 

DAWN KASPER
M44, 2016
David Lewis

kasper
I am drawn to these Dawn Kasper sculptures, as I am obsessed with music intersecting with art making.

 

YURI PATTISON
dust scraper fan 1.9 (power and wealth to honor leaders or religions to stretch architectural limits), 2016
mother’s tankstation

pattison

Yuri Pattison pushes the boundaries of our art world and how data engages with us all. I’m hugely looking forward to his first UK institutional show at Chisenhale opening in July, as well the outcomes of his winning the Frieze Artist Prize for 2016.

 

GERDA SCHEEPERS
The Style, 2016
Blank

scheepers

Gerda Scheepers makes collages that disturb and disrupt, but are cohesive and use disparate materials to create an aesthetic whole.


Notes:

Overall in my selections I have been somewhat drawn to similar sculptural forms and colours evolving from a variety of materials (Sheepers, Pattison, Kasper, Darling) and obviously (to me) selecting some moving image works (Nissinen, Moulton, Auder), as they are great and it is vital that galleries at art fairs bring art forms that do not necessarily have the same commercial allure as 2d object based artworks, but as art mediums that are being used by most artists, which you would not believe, if you only ever saw artworks at art fairs.

I am always looking at/and for moving image and sound works at art fairs … and alas, rarely find much. It has been my work for over the last 15 years – being focused on showing artists moving image works and most often projects during major art fair periods, as this is when the finite art audience reaches its highest demand for art consumption. 

Liste, like NADA, Sunday, etc … gives us hope in the art world that there is the potential for great new galleries, new artists, new ideas – before the cyclical homogeneity (albeit often great!) of the major art fair commercial allure sets it.

Jane Bustin – Rehearsal review in Saturation Point

In Copperfield, Jane Bustin, Laurence Noga, London, Nijinsky, Saturation Point, Uncategorized on 13/05/2016 at 12:25 pm

Jane Bustin: Rehearsal at Copperfield Gallery, London

16 March – 20 May 2016

A review by Laurence Noga

http://www.saturationpoint.org.uk/

“The systems approach is compatible with the evidence that human decisions are largely based on an intuitive feeling of rightness – Rechtsgefuhl – but seeks to validate this subjective feeling by a massive information input, which stands in true correspondence with reality before being refracted through the unconscious.” Jeffrey Steele (Systems, Arts Council 1972-3)

Jane Bustin’s material approaches allow an open system, without a hierarchy. They include: fresco techniques; oil-washed aluminium; acrylic panel painting with ceramic glazes; mirrored copper with latex; polyurethane; wood; copper; silk; paper; gesso; ceramics and ready-made objects

Together, the artist’s relaxed sense of geometry evident in her idiosyncratic solo exhibition, Rehearsal, at the Copperfield Gallery, her sense of rhythm, and her distinctive handling of material through assembly and editing, effect a powerful coercion on her audience.

Bustin works with a highly fragile phenomenology in her expanded approach to painting. This sense of ‘memorial’ is interwoven with techniques that are always meaningful, and which bring together a systematic emphasis on materiality with an intuitive proportional balance. Like Donald Judd, Bustin uses pairs as a single work. She is prepared to generate, or test, arbitrary oppositions in her approach to symmetry and asymmetry, combined with her technical virtuosity in surface facture. With Bustin the relationship between the artist and the object is always equal.

Jane Bustin: Faun, acrylic, polyurethane, copper pins, balsa wood, 50cm x 100cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

The influence of the Russian ballet star Vaslav Nijinsky (1890 – 1950) underpins her decisions here, as a dancer who exceeded the limits of traditional ballet. But this is a show with a more personal edge, not only because works like Faun (2015) are hung at the same height as Bustin’s son, who is also a dancer, but through her ongoing correspondence with the painter Jeffrey Steele. That conversation, in its lucidity and recognition of significant concrete events, combined with an understanding of the intimacy of human relationships (expressed in writers like Proust) casts a spell over the exhibition.

Jane Bustin: Spectre, acrylic, oil, wood, aluminium, 30cm x 35cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

Research, collaboration, and correspondence all seem to have equal weight in Bustin’s vivid shorthand of privacy and illusion. In her work Spectre (2015), Bustin’s line of enquiry synchronises the different surface qualities. She uses two adjoining panels to register an apparition with unequal time value. The painting’s assembly and colour decisions disturb that passage of time, allowing the colour, and its spatial depth, to register in the viewer’s subconscious. The side of this work interacts with the spectator, flickering enough colour peripherally to be visible as you view the front of the work. This phosphorescence attracts your curiosity, makes you look at the sides with equal scrutiny. The small deep red rectangle at the bottom corner of the Prussian/Ultramarine blue panel has an intense registration, played off the frontal white rectangle.

The manipulation of this structure calls to mind the relief constructions of Victor Pasmore, where the painted wood and plastic (e.g. Relief Construction in White, Black and Indian Red, 1961) is handled in an instinctive manner. I get right down underneath this picture to investigate the stained surface of the red /silver panel, but it’s the light green/red lines painted down its side, with a minute red rectangle at its base, which creates that relationship between form and substance.

Jane Bustin, Nijinsky’s Window, oil, acrylic, aluminium, porcelain, oxides, 30cm x 28cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

In one of Bustin’s conversations with Steele in 2014 they talked specifically about Proust’s Remembrance of Things Past. That sense of insight feels embedded into Bustin’s operations and assemblage. Nijinsky’s Window (2015), 30 x 28 cm, oil, acrylic, aluminium, porcelain, oxides, has a bodily emphasis in the handling of the surface facture, but the power and strength of the dancer feels unbalanced, perhaps alluding to Nijinsky’s social awkwardness. The thin, slightly inflated porcelain ceramic feels torn and dysfunctional, hinting at Nijinsky’s fragile mental health just after the First World War. The in-between space has the most concentrated red/gold oxide colour which filters out into the continuous undulating surface, echoing Morris Louis’ veiled paintings such as Mem (1959), allowing the same sense of diffusion and enveloping of the viewer in the same moment.

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Jane Bustin, Rehearsal II, copper, acrylic, oxides, cloth, 80cm x 50cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

Rehearsal II (2015) is strategically persistent in its placement; the mirrored copper surface nags at our self-consciousness. This encounter catches the viewer off guard, stretching the neck adjusting their position. Nijinsky, in his score for L’Après-midi d’un faune, talks about this inclination of the head, a slight forward tilt. With Bustin we get the history (Robert Morris or Judd a reflection of polished metal) but we also experience the exhibition space or the rehearsal space. The cloths hung next to the work further extend the colour source. They pick up on the opaque colour used in tonal shifts on the side of the work. The cloths themselves are important to a more philosophical sense of system.

Jane Bustin, Nijinsky I, overall, acrylic, thule, polyurethane, wood, 28cm x 44cm, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

In the symmetrical work Nijinsky I , (2015) the use of opacity and transparency introduces real and virtual depth, with an internal compositional relationship. The work is sensual, psychologically charged. Bustin states that the materials include ‘thule’; this is a term used in medieval geography to denote an unknown place, beyond the borders of the known world. The light and its illusionism connect to a feeling of unreality. You start to notice the small white ceramic cloth, its connotations shifting the balance of the show, reminding me of the work of Joseph Beuys with his interest in different substances, and how they could be explored through spirituality and ecstasy.

Jane Bustin, Rose, Copper, oil acrylic, polyurethane. 30cm x 42cm, 2016. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London

Rose (2015) draws our attention further towards the problems of construction. This work seems to have the greatest sense of a machine aesthetic. By this I mean that it impacts on the viewer through a sense of co-existence. Its visual power echoes both the machinery of the dancer, and the industrial impulse that drives the language of precision.

Nijinsky, like Steele, was a revolutionary. His use of symmetry and ‘sensual expression’ questioned the role of choreography, to the point where he became paranoid, even frightened of the other dancers in his company. Bustin explores this sense of vulnerability and subversive attitude by making her works objects of desire. Through a kind of dematerialisation, she invites recognition of the perceptual/ psychological/physical. The whole installation adds this extra dimension through a sensation of sound and movement. Its undulation and acceleration is dependent not only on the notion of sequence, but in its very intimate exploration of symmetry and resonance.

The strength of the show is its ability to engage us in a series of relationships which push the viewer towards a systematic/ syntagmatic order. That system has an elaborate complexity in which the conversation between language, literature, linguistics and logic combine. There is an inherent chain of reaction, which unwraps, for the spectator, a dialogue between concept and object. This multi-layered synthesis of art and life is backed up by Bustin’s understanding of a semiological approach, in which she is able simultaneously to induce a memorable sensation with a combination of generative and emotional processes in the real space.


The exhibition runs weekly, Wednesday – Saturday, 12 – 6pm until 20 May, 2016

©Copyright Patrick Morrissey and Clive Hancock.  All rights reserved.

Jane Bustin – Rehearsal at Copperfield London

In Copper, Copperfield, Jane Bustin, Nijinsky, Rehearsal, Uncategorized, Will Lunn on 28/02/2016 at 7:11 pm

 

Rehearsal II

JANE BUSTIN: REHEARSAL

Opens 16 March, 6-9pm

Runs weekly:
Wednesday – Saturday, 12-6pm until 6 May

Copperfield
6 Copperfield Street, London SE1 0EP
www.copperfieldgallery.com

+44 (0) 7845 594 549

Jane Bustin (b. 1964 Hertfordshire, UK) works within an expanded understanding of painting, mixing fresco techniques with oil washed aluminium, acrylic panel painting with ceramic and glazes, mirrored copper with latex, polyurethane and woven cotton.

Bustin’s solo exhibition Rehearsal presents a series of paintings that take Modernist Russian ballet icon Vaslav Nijinsky (1890 – 1950) as a central reference. For all the apparent poise and fragility of ballet, every worthy composition is bold in its own right, underpinned by immense strength. Similarly her paintings balance the fragility of millimetre thin ceramic, fabric and pale tones with hard edges, metal and vivid colour.

Reflection is inherent in the work due to the polished metal panels that recur in her compositions, but Bustin makes particular use of the edge of her works, reflecting light off carefully chosen colours and finishes to extend the composition onto the wall. These effects can only be appreciated by exploring the paintings in person, connecting her work with Nijinsky who only ever wanted his performances experienced first hand – never recorded.

Nijinsky pioneered a revolutionary use of symmetry and ‘sensual expression’ leading to a new era for modern ballet. In her own practice, Bustin explores the effects of balance, placement and dimension, but what intrigues her most about the dancer is his obsession with the idea that the audience ‘could feel him’. This bridges with Bustin’s eagerness to raise the emotional encounter with the artwork beyond the immediate and purportedly rational aims of Minimalism and Modernist Geometric Abstraction. In this sense, Rehearsal connects beyond Nijinsky to the wider thinking of the Belle Epoch (1870 – 1914); a new social order that favoured fresh modes of emotional expression within the arts in opposition to the ‘rational’ Enlightenment thinking.

Any reference to prior movements is critically interpreted by the artist on her own terms and the result of all this careful drawing together is work where nothing is arbitrary. Despite this, Bustin embraces a certain permeability that invites viewers to entertain their own perspectives, rather than fostering the kind of singular and absolute, dogmatic approach so often found in related Modernist movements.

click for more images

For a preview works list please email info@copperfieldgallery.com

Image: Rehearsal II (2015) cloth, acrylic, copper, oxides 100cm x 80cm overall