David Gryn blog

Archive for the ‘Gallery’ Category

The Nijinsky project – Faun by Jane Bustin – Art Night London – July 7

In Art Night, Art NIght London, BFI, Copperfield, Gallery, Isaac Gryn, Jane Bustin, Jane Gryn, John Snijders, Marriot, Nijinsky, Uncategorized on 03/06/2018 at 4:43 pm

The Nijinsky project – Faun by Jane Bustin

A performance and installation featuring:

Dancer, Isaac Gryn

Pianist, John Snijders

Art Night London – July 7

King George V Room, Marriott, London County Hall, Westminster Bridge Rd, South Bank, London SE1 7PB

Faun is a performative installation by artist Jane Bustin, inspired by Nijinsky’s iconic work, the first modernist ballet, L’après-midi d’un faune. Bustin presents six artworks each featuring the 1933 biography of Nijinsky by his wife Romola. The live premiere performance conceived by the artist, features her son, dancer Isaac Gryn, alongside a deconstructed version of Debussy’s original composition, titled Afternoon, specially composed by pianist and artistic director of the Ives Ensemble, John Snijders, and will be played live. The installation explores themes of structure and geometry found within relationships of nature and nurture, perfection and failure. Alongside a publication text by curator Poppy Bowers.

Performances at: 6.30pm, 7.30pm and 8.30pm
running time: 13 minutes

Pre-registration required/walk-ins will be admitted depending on capacity

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-nijinsky-project-faun-by-jane-bustin-tickets-47239788479

http://2018.artnight.london/projects/jane-bustin/

http://www.copperfieldgallery.com/jane-bustin.html

https://www.marriott.co.uk |

Instagram @janebustin

Text for Jane Bustin by Anthony Rudolf

In abstraction, Anthony Rudolf, Berlin, Gallery, Jane Bustin, Leslie, Minimal, painting, Uncategorized on 05/07/2017 at 6:53 pm
20170625-MWEISE-LESLIE_GALLERY-JBUSTIN-0014-R2GO_WEB-1920x1281

Jane Bustin, Fühler at Leslie, Berlin

TEXT FOR JANE BUSTIN
Anthony Rudolf

What could be less verbal than a Jane Bustin painting?

What could be more verbal than a Mallarmé poem?

‘One does not write with ideas but with words’, Mallarmé said to Degas, who fancied himself as a poet and had plenty of ideas.

As Borges might have said, we would expect the first livre d’artiste to have been created by Mallarmé (as translator) and Manet: Poe’s ‘Raven’, and we would be right.

Let me rephrase my first sentence: not what could be less verbal but what could be more silent than a Jane Bustin painting? After all, Debussy’s La Mer is as wordless as a Bustin painting. Silent it is not.

(Debussy set one of Mallarmé’s most significant poems, ‘L’Après-midi d’un faune’, to music. Mallarmé told Degas: ‘I thought I had already set it to music’).

My answer to the question posed above — what could be more silent than a Jane Bustin painting? — is a dead child whose absence his poet father commemorates, that “absence [which] is condensed presence” (the phrase is from a letter of Emily Dickinson, a poet well worth reading “against” Mallarmé).

The dead child is Anatole Mallarmé, whom Jane Bustin too commemorates and whose existence breathes into, inspires, Jane Bustin’s paintings, via the father’s heart-rending posthumously published poem.

It is neither paradoxical nor ironic that Jane Bustin depends so heavily on words during the gestation of her work exhibited at Test-tube. Goya went further: he included words inside the visual image.

Mallarmé would have reacted to these paintings with silence. He was always eloquent.

By Anthony Rudolf 2012

from
European Hours: Collected Poems by Anthony Rudolf

Born in London in 1942, Anthony Rudolf has two children and two grandchildren. He is the author of books of literary criticism (on Primo Levi, Piotr Rawicz and others), autobiography (The Arithmetic of Memory) and poetry (The Same River Twice and collaborations with artists), and translator of books of poetry from French (Bonnefoy, Vigée, Jabès), Russian (Vinokourov and Tvardovsky) and other languages. He has edited various anthologies. His essay on R.B. Kitaj was published by the National Gallery in 2001, and he has published essays on other painters. He is Paula Rego’s partner and main male model. He has completed a volume of short stories and is now at work on two new memoirs. His reviews, articles, poems, translations, obituaries and interviews with writers have appeared in numerous journals. Rudolf is an occasional broadcaster on radio and television and founder of Menard Press. After a lifetime of uninvolving day jobs, he became Visiting Lecturer in Arts and Humanities at London Metropolitan University (2000-2003) and Royal Literary Fund fellow at the Universities of Hertfordshire and Westminster (2003-2008). In 2004, he was appointed Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture and, in 2005, he was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature

Jane Bustin, Fühler at Leslie, Berlin

http://lesliegallery.de/jane-bustin/

Jane Bustin, Fühler at Leslie, Berlin 22 June

In Art, Berlin, Ceramics, Copper, Copperfield, Gallery, Jane Bustin, Leslie, Paintings, Poppy Bowers, Uncategorized, Whitworth on 18/06/2017 at 11:41 am
3D work by Jane Bustin

Rehearsal II, copper, acrylic, oxides, cloth
80cm x 50 cm overall, Jane Bustin, 2015

Jane Bustin

Fühler

Opening: 22.6.17, 6 pm
Exhibition: 23.6.17 – 20.7.17

Leslie

Bergfriedstraße 20
10969 Berlin

http://lesliegallery.de/

Since the 18th century, European philosophers have distinguished our capacity to feel subjectively from our ability to think rationally. We are sentient beings. As the late neurologist and author Oliver Sacks claimed, ‘perception is never purely in the present – it has to be drawn on experience of the past’. Jane Bustin’s exhibition Fühler, to have feelers or sensors about a given subject, calls on this capacity.

Bustin’s approach to painting foregrounds a conscious experience of material surface and texture. Although abstract, her works are evocations of people and histories. They are grounded in a range of intellectual sources, primarily European modernist poetry, design and literature as well as theology and philosophy. Such concepts are given physical expression through her intuitive arrangements of materials. Oil, dyed silk, porcelain, woven cloth, polished copper, tulle and ceramic glazes are just some of the media used to give shape and feeling to philosophical ideas. Born out of the tactile, her works are Fühler; they are imbued with a sensory memory and resonate with emotion.

Four works in the show, Apres II, Nijinsky I, Nijinksy’s Windows and Rehearsal II, pay tribute to the radical Russian ballet dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinksy (1890-1950). Rising to prominence as part of the belle epoch, Nijinksy combined depth and intensity of expression with symmetry to pioneer new stylistic ideas in modern dance, echoed in the compositional balance of Bustin’s three textural diptychs.

In Après II textile becomes a stand-in for the body and the memory of its physical activity. It takes its cue from Nijinsky’s choreography of the ballet L’apres midi d’un Faun in 1912, where the movement of fabric is used as a metaphor for sexual desire and physical exhaustion. Like most of Bustin’s works the scale is of human proportions. Hung quite low, Apres II sits on the wall around the height of the artist’s heart.

Elsewhere, earlier works in the exhibition include Christina the Astonishing, part of a series referencing the iconography of female saints and Tablet I, Tablet III and Tablet IV, evoking archaic forms of communication. Combining sheets of paper from both old and new notebooks, they prompt memories of the past alongside thoughts of the future.

Refusing to be filmed during his lifetime, Nijinsky strongly believed his performances should only be experienced live. Likewise Bustin prefers her works to be encountered in real time under the honest inconsistency of natural light. Like the tip of antennae, one’s eyes should roam over surface, roll over folds, shift focus through diaphanous layers and peer into copper reflections. Her works call upon an understanding of Fühler and our capacity to feel as sentient beings. They ask us to look again.

Text by Poppy Bowers, Curator, Whitworth Gallery, Manchester

Exhibited works

Facebook Event

Daata Editions at Super Woofer featuring Matt Copson 

In artists, Daata, Daata Editions, Gallery, London, Matt's Gallery, Mile End, Super Wofer, X Marks the Bokship on 28/07/2015 at 9:22 am
matt-copson-broadcast_1

Matt Copson, Broadcast (2015)

Daata Editions presents

Moralise the Masses, a new performance by Matt Copson

Curated by Dani Papadimitrou

at 

Super Woofer sound fair at X Marks the Bökship at Matt’s Gallery

Daata Editions is featuring at Super Woofer, a one-day sound fair, organised by X Marks the Bökship at Matt’s Gallery, London. Focussing on the Daata Editions Sound section artists that include Ilit Azoulay, Matt Copson, Leo Gabin, Lina Lapelyte, Hannah Perry, Stephen Vitiello, Daata Editions presents Moralise the Masses, a new performance by Matt Copson.

Moralise the Masses features Reynard Incarnate, Matt’s fox alter-ego, with a live monologue and musical accompaniment by Alex White and Mark William. Expect lascivious sax and lots of shouting.

Super Woofer sound fair has invited artists and audio publishers to have stalls for selling and displaying analogue and digital audio works, including: Keith Harrison, Plastique Fanstastique, Benedict Drew, Marcia Farquhar, Leo Chadburn, Mikatsiu, John Lawrence, Daniela Cascella, Robert Pratt, Cesura // Acceso, Erinyes, Flange Zoo, 38b, Exploit.zzxjoanw.Gen, Girolamo Marri, Drawing Room Confessions, Sonic Imperfections, Trestle Records, Matt’s Gallery, Consumer Waste, Editions of You, Top Nice, DISFIGMENT/BANKRUPSEA, The Cast of the Crystal Set, Dancehall, Sinkhole, Lost Toy Records, WE.

Fair date & hours:

August 1, 2015

1 – 8pm

Matt Copson performance: 5pm

Location:

X Marks the Bökship

Matt’s Gallery 42 – 44 Copperfield Road, Mile End, London E3 4RR

More information: www.bokship.org

The London Open 2015 – a FAD Q&A with Jane Bustin.

In abstract, Art, Artist, FAD, Gallery, Jane Bustin, London Open, LondonOpen2015, Magazine, Minimal, painting, Whitechapel on 21/07/2015 at 12:34 pm
photo 3

Tabitha’s Cape 2014 by Jane Bustin

The London Open 2015 Q&A with artist Jane Bustin. A FAD Magazine Interview

The London Open Whitechapel Gallery’s triennial exhibition has just opened. 48 of the most dynamic and exciting artists have been chosen from an entry of over 2100 and this online interview comes from FAD Magazine …

1. Have you always felt yourself an artist?
Probably after the first week of art school when I realised you could actually just paint all day.

2. Can you tell us more about your work and what are the main ideas you would like to express?
I make abstract formal compositions reflecting on modernism and materiality. & I take influences from 14th century frescos, 15th century Dutch painting, iconography, modernist architecture and design, French modernist literature, dance, fabrics, books, hardware stores, Japanese ceramics, neon signs, cosmetics, sweet wrappers …

My main interest is to create a resonance within the work that goes beyond its material properties.

3. How do you start the process of making work?
The start of the work is always through the choice of materials.

4. Do you consider the viewer, when making your work?
Always and never, since I am primarily the viewer.

5. Name 3 artists that have inspired your work.
Masaccio

Vermeer

Rothko

6. What defines something as a work of art?
When you need to look again and again and something stirs in the pit of your stomach.

7. How was it finding out you had been chosen as part of The London Open?
Satisfying

8. How have you found working with the Whitechapel Gallery on the exhibition?
The curators and assistants have been superb, I have never before as an Artist in a large open exhibition felt so considered, involved and appreciated.

9. What plans do you have to continue to pursue your art career in 2015?
I am looking forward to exhibiting in November at the Ingleby Gallery, Edinburgh in a show ‘Resistance and Persistence’ based on an essay by Sean Scully on Giorgio Morandi, including works from both artists.

10. Final Question – if you had £49,000 to buy art who would you invest it in?
Women Artists over the age of 49!

www.janebustin.com

Get more details on The London Open: HERE

Whitechapel Gallery

77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Tube: Aldgate East 

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/

T +44 (0)20 7522 7888 

E info@whitechapelgallery.org

Twitter 

Facebook 

The London Open 2015

Galleries 1, 8 & 9

Mon: Closed

Tues, Weds, Fri, Sat, Sun: 11am–6pm

Thurs: 11am–9pm

Rachel Maclean – Let It Go – Inverness Museum and Art Gallery – July 2015

In Daata, Daata Editions, Gallery, Inverness, Museum, Rachel Maclean, scotland on 06/07/2015 at 12:10 pm

Rachel Maclean poster

Rachel Maclean

Let It Go !

Inverness Museum & Art Gallery

11 July – 22 August 2015

Rachel Maclean‘s works for Daata Editions collectively titled Let It Go ! will form part of the artist’s solo show at Inverness Museum & Art Gallery, UK.

Using green screen technology, Rachel Maclean constructs fantasy narratives set in computer-generated landscapes. Maclean plays each of the characters in her films donning outlandish self-made costumes and thick make-up. Comprised of six videos, Let it Go, explores themes of class, aspiration and childhood as 6 wide-eyed pauper characters mime to dialogue sourced from YouTube. These segments are spliced together with passionate confessions of hunger, rage, suffering and insecurity.

More information: highlifehighland.com

Rachel Maclean limited editions available at http://daata-editions.com