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Elephant Magazine Interview with David Gryn on Daata Editions

In Art Video, Artspace, Daata, Daata Editions, David Gryn, Elephant, Frieze, Frieze Art Fair, Uncategorized on 10/10/2016 at 7:45 am

Daata Editions launched in May 2015, presenting editions by 18 artists that were available to be acquired as downloads. Over one year on, Director David Gryn discusses their latest releases, and Daata’s role in an art world that is finally coming round to the digital. New works will be released as Frieze London kicks off this week.

Can you tell me a little about the latest artworks that you’ve released? 

We have released many new artworks over the last several months, on the site we now have over 65 artists and 350 commissioned artworks. Coinciding with the Frieze Art Fair we released new sets of artworks by Ed Fornieles, Ariana Reines, Daniel Swan, Artie Vierkant, a single work each by 6 New Contemporaries selected artists — Melanie Eckersley, Hannah Ford, Jasmine Johnson, Scott Lyman, Scott Mason, Abri de Swardt — and the Daata & Artspace commission Terrorist of Love by Keren Cytter, which will be the latest artwork that is free to download. We have also just recently released new artworks at Expo Chicago by: Larry Achiampong, Casey Jane Ellison, Rashaad Newsome, Tameka Norris, Saya Woolfalk and Gutter Records selects: Jake Chapman, Graham Dolphin, Joachim Koester & Stefan A. Pedersen.

What do you look for in the artists you work with?

We look for artists who have an interest in using a variety of digital mediums. Artists whose work we perceive will speak to and engage an audience who will primarily view the work via the website. We work with artists who are known to us via the art world ecosystem and artists who collaborate well. 

Are any new or young artists particularly exciting you right now?

I visit, tutor and lecture at many leading art schools and I am mightily impressed by recent encounters with graduates: Molly Palmer, Susannah Stark, Elliot Dodds, Jonathan Montague, Alice Jacobs, Anna Grenman, to name but a few. As Curator of Film & Sound for Art Basel at Miami Beach, I get to discover new artists all the time, as many leading galleries send me links to their artists’ work and submit them for the programming that I have been curating for the last 7 years.

We have launched a new section on Daata called ‘Curated’, and this is conceived to work with other voices in the artworks and introduce artists we may not have collaborated with or even heard of before. We have started this off with curator Katherine Finerty and her exhibition Reuse, remix, recode: Digital identity politics and the Power of PL►Y, from which she has now introduced artist Phoebe Boswell to the site.

We are interested in all generations of artists, it is just that the newer generations of artists use digital means as a (generalised) more natural process — but not exclusively. I am always excited by the artists that I am working with and the potential of those I do not know. 

Although in many ways you offer an alternative to the traditional physical gallery structure, have any particular galleries or institutions taken well to the concept of Daata Editions and provided strong support? Further to this, which spaces do you feel are really embracing the digital age?

We have had great support and collaborations with a variety of leading art fairs — NADA, Independent, Frieze, Expo Chicago, Chart — and these in turn bring us in direct parity and contact with the galleries that are selected for these fairs. There are galleries such as Arcadia Missa, Seventeen, Pilar Corrias, Bitforms, American Medium, Postmasters (to name just a few from the top of my head) who really get it and treat artists using digital mediums as equal to artists using any other medium. 

We have had great support from the Hammer Museum, Julia Stoschek Collection, Zabludowicz Collection and KIASMA Finland, all of whom have acquired most of the works that were released initially on Daata Editions. 

The digital world is constantly developing, have you found that Daata is required to evolve at a faster pace than other art platforms to keep up with this?

We set up Daata to be a platform to service artists who work with digital mediums and inherently the mediums will evolve and develop, but the internet is a rather established outlet so we see it as a hyper-normal method for display and distribution and are interested in propagating this. We are not really able to predict what future developments will sweep us all off our feet, but we believe we are perfectly placed to adapt and engage with whatever comes next. 

Developments in the dot com / internet development world are super fast. But I see our project as an equivalent to websites like the Guardian or the online record store Sounds of the Universe (also designed by our designers Studio Scasascia) that provide a platform for the distribution of information and downloadable music. We are always open to new methods of collaboration and technologies. 

We set up Daata to be an online equivalent of a gallery, but not trying to be a gallery. So we need to serve artists and audiences with a long term solution. We do not have a crystal ball on how the future will unpack, but we have informed instincts and these are how we can create solutions. The surprising fastest adopters of what we are trying to do are enlightened collectors, as they are often fascinated by the new, the innovative and the unexpected.

How has the relationship between art and digital development changed since Daata began? Do you have new challenges now?

In the short time since we started I have seen a move towards a greater desire for collaboration from potentially competitive or rival platforms. As we each have our own strengths and output I strongly believe that there has to be a wide array of similar platforms, much like there are similar galleries worldwide, as we can only ever have a finite capacity and indeed budget to commission and work with a limited number of artists at any time. 

Our challenge is not about the future, but about what is around us and how we can convey what we are doing to audiences and that they can have a relationship with the artworks we distribute and display. 

What do you see in the future for both Daata and the wider relationship between art and the digital? 

Simply that the conversation of and around art made with digital mediums will move onto the conversation about the artwork and the artist — the artist is paramount and that was always the purpose of Daata, to be a leading voice and example in the landscape of online distribution platforms — and that we will be joined by many other fantastic players and their voices. 

daata-editions.com/. All images courtesy the artist and Daata Editions. 

https://elephantmag.com/interview-david-gryn-daata-editions/

5 Questions with Daata Editions – Elephant Magazine

In Art Basel, Charles Richardson, Chloe Wise, Daata Editions, daataeditions, David Blandy, David Gryn, Elephant, Uncategorized, Video on 21/11/2015 at 10:59 am

5 Questions with Daata Editions

http://www.elephantmag.com/5-questions-with-daata-editions/

Text by Emily Steer

Daata Editions is an online platform that commissions digital artists’ editions—mostly video-, sound- and web-based. Season One brought together eighteen artists, who each created six pieces of work, last month joining two different collections in completion; Germany’s Julia Stoschek Collection and LA’s Hammer Museum.

Season One featured the work of; Ilit Azoulay, Helen Benigson, David Blandy, Matt Copson, Ed Fornieles, Leo Gabin, Daniel Keller & Martti Kalliala, Lina Lapelyte, Rachel Maclean, Florian Meisenberg, Takeshi Murata, Hannah Perry, Jon Rafman, Charles Richardson, Amalia Ulman, Stephen Vitiello and Chloe Wise.

Here, five of the artists discuss the purpose of digital platforms in the present art world and the future of art online.

When did you start work with Daata Editions, and what do you feel online platforms can offer to digital artists?

Chloe Wise: I began working with Daata Editions for their first iteration–or season of artists I suppose–about a year ago now. For an emerging artist, especially for an artist working with digital media, it can be hard to find viewership, a consumer market, a collector base, the funds with which to produce work, and a comprehensive placement within the art world for oneself. Working with Daata Editions not only enabled the artists, including myself, to create work that otherwise may not have been made, but to circulate this work in the context of art fairs, screenings both indoors and outdoors, in a gallery setting as well as online and placing the works into great collections and institutions. This visibility and accessibility is imperative to digital work, which is in a state of growth and change, and is so easily dismissed in the constant flow of images and videos on the internet.

As a digital artist, do you consider the fit of your work on the market, or is this a secondary concern? 

Florian Meisenberg: When creating either a digital or analogue art work, I don’t start by thinking about it fitting into the market. Generally, my motivation to create art is not dependent on its degree of ‘fitability’ with anything. Although sometimes I feel embarrassed that I can’t sign my videos.

Have you felt the reception towards digital work change in any way since you began your practice?  

David Blandy: When I started exhibiting, the digital world of computing, gaming and the Internet were marginal cultural interests, the preserve of geeks like me. The Internet was dial up, computer games were making their first experiments in 3D graphics, and VHS was the standard exhibition format for video. So my work thinking about and using digital culture, using backgrounds from video games and performances inside virtual spaces, were seen as pretty alien from mainstream culture and were probably pretty mystifying to an artworld that was largely computer illiterate. Now the digital is central to our everyday visual culture–CGI on tv, adverts, films, every photo is computer manipulated, only occasional heads unbowed at train stations, contemplating the sky rather than their phone.

Do you feel that your work exists in accordance with the technology it was created for? Or is the material something that could be transferred to different tech over the years?

Matt Copson: My work exists in accordance but is not enslaved by current technology. I’m sure things would change radically with any contextual shifts, be they technological, political or financial but hopefully my work isn’t just a symptom of its time. Most of the more digital aspects of my work and installations are basic or quite a primitive use of more complex programs. I don’t care for professionalising my skills, rather I enjoy being an enthusiastic amateur with a level of distance from the technology I’m using. I like the idea of using photoshop in the same way I’d carve a sculpture with a chainsaw and sledgehammer. I see no reason why works couldn’t be transferred to different technology over the years. But my principal concern, of course, is in how they are shown/heard in the present.

What do you see being the biggest driver of digital art in the future?

Helen Benigson: I am sure the continuous and accelerating trend of the public giving up personal data to big companies will lead to some very interesting work being made. However, I also feel that as the body becomes even more exploited through medical and visceral mediation online, artists will necessarily need to drive a new concept of what intimacy, privacy and the corporeal looks like. I don’t think there has ever been more of a crucial time to bring art and technology together, than the current climate we are living in. There is increasingly a general blurring of boundaries and a development of terms such as the ‘creative’ or ‘cultural producer’, via the recruitment of artists into the technology industry which has a more general emphasis on the idea of creativity at work across many different industry sectors. Many of the concepts that have shaped the working culture in the tech industry (such as ‘play’, live-work, loft spaces and temporary contracts) are derived from artists’ working habits, like Second Home and its relationship to the Serpentine Pavilion. It is essential to understand these messy overlaps in order to try to decipher how and where art will move to as artists move away from big cities and increasingly have to work more online in order to survive.

All works: 2015, Courtesy Daata Editions

Daata Editions featured in Elephant Magazine – Summer 2015

In Art, Art Basel, artists, Daata Editions, Elephant, Frieze, Magazine, Moving Image, NADA, Post-Internet, Video on 29/06/2015 at 12:00 pm
ed-fornieles-bathing

Ed Fornieles, Bathing (2015). Courtesy the artist and Daata Editions

Daata-Editions

Dates: Ongoing

Daata-Editions launched its online platform for the sale of video, web and sound editions at NADA, Frieze New York, Salon 94 and Soho House this spring. The simple and extremely well designed project allows collectors to easily and confidently download digital art forms that have until now been thought of as difficult to acquire.

“It’s about creating an economy for artists working in these mediums during a curious time of change” says founder David Gryn, who has been working with artists for over twenty years, including curating the film programme at Art Basel Miami Beach. “People think that online is some kind of mythological space where things happen automatically, but that’s not the case. We need to encourage artists to know that these mediums are valued.”

‘Season One’ of Daata-Editions sees 18 artists including Ed Forneiles, Leo Gabin, Chloe Wise, Florian Meisenberg, David Blandy, Hannah Perry and Ilit Azoulay commissioned to produce six works, no longer than three minutes long each, which will be released on the site regularly. The artists are commissioned and paid in full for the works, as well as receiving royalties on the sale of the editions, and are free to experiment entirely on their artworks.

You can view and buy the works at www.daata-editions.com

by Molly Taylor, Elephant Magazine

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Taken from the latest print issue of Elephant Magazine

Elephant, Issue 23, Summer 2015 – What is Post Internet Art ?

Pages 19, 29, 135, 136

Elephant and Daata image